Military Factory logo
Icon of F-15 Eagle military combat fighter aircraft
Icon of Abrams Main Battle Tank
Icon of AK-47 assault rifle
Icon of navy warships
Icon of a dollar sign
Icon of military officer saluting

HESA Ababil-3

Intelligence-Surveillance-Reconnaissance (ISR) Drone

HESA Ababil-3

Intelligence-Surveillance-Reconnaissance (ISR) Drone

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
IMAGES
Overview



The HESA Ababil-3 ISR drone is a further evolution of the original Ababil series - reworked to include a twin-boom configuration among other changes.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Iran
YEAR: 2008
STATUS: Active, In-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Iran Aircraft Manufacturing Industrial Company (HESA) - Iran
PRODUCTION: 550
OPERATORS: Iraq; Iran; Sudan; Syria
National flag of Iran
IRA
National flag of Iraq
IRQ
National flag of Sudan
SUD
National flag of Syria
SYR
Technical Specifications



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the HESA Ababil-3 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 0
POWER: 1 x Conventional engine (perhaps Limbach L550E or similar) driving a multi-bladed propeller unit at the rear of the fuselage in "pusher" arrangement.
ADVERTISEMENTS
WIDTH / SPAN

0
feet
0
meters
SPEED (MAX)

0
mph
0
kph
0
knots
CEILING

0
feet
0
meters
0
miles
RANGE

0
miles
0
kilometers
0
nautical miles
Armament



None. Mission-equipment to satisfy the ISR role (mainly cameras and sensors).
Variants / Models



• Ababil-3 - Base Series Designation.


History



Detailing the development and operational history of the HESA Ababil-3 Intelligence-Surveillance-Reconnaissance (ISR) Drone.  Entry last updated on 5/21/2019. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Ababil-3 (also Ababil-III) is a further evolution of the "Ababil" family of Iranian-originated Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) featured elsewhere on this site. The family of drones, developed and manufactured by Iranian local industry, includes the original Ababil-1 "loitering munition" drone, the improved Ababil-2, and the twin-boom Ababil-CH. The Ababil-3 variant is a major reworking of the established design and intended as a dedicated Intelligence-Surveillance-Reconnaissance (ISR) platform at the military or national security levels. Production is thought to have started in 2008 and the system remains in service as of this writing (May 2019).

Due to its physical resemblance to the Denel Dynamics "Seeker" product, the Ababil-3 is suspected to be an Iranian copy/clone of the South African design. Additionally, its internal components appear to be copies/clones of existing Western-originated offerings.

Externally, the Ababil-3 utilizes a proven twin-boom arrangement which seats the tubular fuselage centrally in its design arrangement. The fuselage contains all pertinent systems including the optics set, avionics, powerplant, and fuel stores. The optics set is contained in a ventral "blister" with 360-degree traversal and real-time tracking and reporting possible. The mainplanes were fixed members seated along the dorsal spine of the fuselage providing the needed lift-versus-drag qualities as well as flight control surfaces. The twin booms are slim appendages reaching aft and each is capped by rectangular tailplanes joined by a single horizontal surface (elevator). The aircraft can conduct its ground actions (such as take-off, landing, and general ground-running) by way of a fixed, three-point undercarriage that is wheeled and faired over. Construction of the aircraft includes composites.

Dimensions of the air vehicle include a wingspan of seven meters, making it dimensionally larger than the preceding Ababil-2 mark. Power is derived from a single conventional engine, most likely a copied form of a German design (believed to stem from the Limbach L550E) driving a multi-bladed propeller unit found at the rear of the fuselage component set in a "pusher" configuration. Performance figures include a maximum speed of 120 miles-per-hour and a combat radius out to 62 miles while being capable of reaching altitudes of 16,000 feet.

The Ababil-3 is a known entity above the skies of Iraq, Syria, and Sudan. Several have been lost in both combat-related and accidental actions, the latter owing to either poor training or poor quality of the air vehicle. An American-flown F-16 Fighting Falcon claimed an Ababil-3 on February 25th, 2009 after the aircraft had been trailed across Iraqi airspace for some seventy minutes.

The Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force operates the Ababil-3 exclusively in the ISR role. In Syria, the system is redesignated as "Zagil III-B". To Kataib Hezbollah, the air vehicle becomes the "Basir-1".




Media







Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed
Hi: 150mph
Lo: 75mph
This entry's maximum listed speed (121mph).

Graph average of 112.5 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the HESA Ababil-3's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production (550)
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
550
550

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.


Site Disclaimer  |  Privacy Policy  |  Cookies  |  Site Map

www.MilitaryFactory.com. Site content ©2003- MilitaryFactory.com, All Rights Reserved.

The "Military Factory" name and MilitaryFactory.com logo are registered ® U.S. trademarks protected by all applicable domestic and international intellectual property laws. All written content, illustrations, and photography are unique to this website (unless where indicated) and not for reuse/reproduction in any form. Material presented throughout this website is for historical and entertainment value only and should not to be construed as usable for hardware restoration, maintenance, or general operation. We do not sell any of the items showcased on this site. Please direct all other inquiries to militaryfactory AT gmail.com.

Part of a network of sites that includes GlobalFirepower, a data-driven property used in ranking the top military powers of the world.


Facebook Logo YouTube Logo