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Renard R.38

Single-Seat Monoplane Fighter Prototype Aircraft

Renard R.38

Single-Seat Monoplane Fighter Prototype Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Renard R.38 was another Belgian fighter attempt that was left unfinished by the time of the German invasion of 1940 - it was taken over by the occupiers, flown, and eventually scrapped.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Belgium
YEAR: 1939
STATUS: Cancelled
MANUFACTURER(S): Renard Brothers - Belgium
PRODUCTION: 1
OPERATORS: Belgium (cancelled); Nazi Germany (tested)
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Renard R.38 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 28.87 feet (8.8 meters)
WIDTH: 38.22 feet (11.65 meters)
HEIGHT: 9.51 feet (2.9 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 4,299 pounds (1,950 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 5,732 pounds (2,600 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Rolls-Royce Merlin II liquid-cooled inline piston engine developing 1,030 horsepower and driving a three-bladed propeller unit at the nose.
SPEED (MAX): 339 miles-per-hour (545 kilometers-per-hour; 294 knots)
RANGE: 839 miles (1,350 kilometers; 729 nautical miles)
CEILING: 32,808 feet (10,000 meters; 6.21 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 2,500 feet-per-minute (762 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



PROPOSED:
4 x 7.7mm OR 13.2mm machine guns in wings (two guns per wing).
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• R.38 - Base Series Designation; sole flyable prototype completed and flown by the Germans; scrapped in France.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Renard R.38 Single-Seat Monoplane Fighter Prototype Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 5/9/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
Try as they might, the Belgians simply could not develop and field an indigenous modern fighter prior to the German invasion of May 1940 during World War 2 (1939-1945). The Renard concern had earlier unsuccessful attempts with their "Epervier" (this lost out to the British Fairey "Firefly II"), the R.36 (the sole prototype crashed claiming the life of its test pilot), and the R.37 (the sole example taken over by the conquering Germans in 1940). The R.38 was to become the last notable entry of the Renard line of metal monoplanes and this design, too, fell to the Germans after their conquest of the Belgian state.

The R.38 was in development alongside the R.37. The R.37 was essentially the radial-engined version of the earlier inline-powered R.36. In this way, the R.38 held more in common with the R.36 by both form and function with the major deviation being its switch to the Rolls-Royce "Merlin II" inline piston engine of 1,030 horsepower output. The wing planform seen in the R.36 and the R.37 was used again in the R.38 to speed and simplify its development and armament changed to become 4 x Machine guns - either 7.7mm or 13.2mm in caliber - and these mounted in the wings. The revised aircraft was a slender and sleek offering of all-metal construction and all-metal skinning. Its pilot was wholly enclosed under a framed canopy and the undercarriage, of tail-dragger configuration, was retractable - all modern qualities of a fighter mount of the period.

A first-flight in prototype form was had on August 4th, 1939 and the results proved rather promising - particularly under the shadow of war with Germany (World War 2 would begin about a month later on September 1st, 1939 with the German invasion of neighboring Poland). However, progress on the R.38 was slow enough that it was still under development when the Germans turned their attentions to the West and took over Belgium, the rest of the Low Countries, and, ultimately, France). Despite a furious resistance, the nation of Belgium fell to the German onslaught and the sole R.38 prototype was taken over by the Luftwaffe who flew it to Bordeaux for a thorough examination. It was eventually scrapped when little could be had from the foreign fighter.

As completed (and flown), the R.38 exhibited similar dimensions as the original R.36 with an overall length of 28.10 feet, a wingspan of 38.2 feet, and a height of 9.6 feet. Performance went on to include a maximum speed of 340 miles per hour and range out to 840 miles. Empty weight became 4,300lb against an MTOW of 5,730lb.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 400mph
Lo: 200mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (339mph).

    Graph average of 300 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
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  LAX
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  NYC
Graph showcases the Renard R.38's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Pie graph section
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Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
1
1

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
Graphical image of an aircraft medium machine gun
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