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TAI Hurjet

Twin-Seat, Twin-Engine Supersonic Advanced Jet Trainer Aircraft

TAI Hurjet

Twin-Seat, Twin-Engine Supersonic Advanced Jet Trainer Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



Official work on the TAI Hurjet project appeared as recently as September 2017 with the intent that it fulfills an advanced jet trainer role in the Turkish Air Force.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Turkey
YEAR: 2023
STATUS: In-Development
MANUFACTURER(S): Turkish Aerospace Industries (TAI) - Turkey / Sierra Nevada Corportation (SNC) - USA
PRODUCTION: 0
OPERATORS: Turkey (probable)
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the TAI Hurjet model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 2
LENGTH: 43.96 feet (13.4 meters)
WIDTH: 36.09 feet (11 meters)
ENGINE: 1 x Williams International FJ44-4M turbofan engines developing between 2,000 and 3,500lb of thrust each.
SPEED (MAX): 920 miles-per-hour (1480 kilometers-per-hour; 799 knots)




ARMAMENT



Externally-held precision-guided bombs, rocket pods, and air-to-surface / anti-tank missiles mounted on six underwing hardpoints (three to a wing). up to 6,610lb of stores carried.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Hurjet - Base Series Name


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the TAI Hurjet Twin-Seat, Twin-Engine Supersonic Advanced Jet Trainer Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 8/7/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Turkish aero-industry has grown considerably over the last few decades with several high-profile projects being worked on including the now-in-service T129 ATAK attack helicopter and the in-development "Hurkus" turboprop basic trainer / light attack platform. Another program in-the-works is an all-new advanced jet trainer, dubbed the "Hurjet", being developed for the Turkish Air Force (TurAF) for service introduction to come sometime in the next decade.

The program is said to be receiving assistance from Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) of the United States which was, at one point, a player in the USAF T-X advanced jet trainer competition. Indeed it is believed that SNC's own T-X design is being used as the framework for the Hurjet project due to similar program requirements. SNC and TAI were joint partners in the short-lived T-X "Freedom Trainer" offering intended to succeed the storied, yet aging, fleet of Northrop T-38 Talon jet trainers in service with the USAF.

SNC marketed the Freedom Trainer under the merits of low procurement cost and reduced financial sustainability commitments.

The Hurjet may be powered by a single Williams International FJ44-4M engine, part of the FJ44 family of turbofans in use by such types as the Swedish Saab 105, the Czech Aero L-39 Albatros and Italian Leonardo M-345. This puts estimated thrust output anywhere between 2,000 and 3,500lb. The same engine fit was proposed with the SNC Freedom trainer concept.

Concept work showcases an aircraft with stepped tandem seating for its crew of two (instructor and student). Side-mounted intakes are used to aspirate the twin (side-by-side) engine arrangement in the fuselage with each unit exhausting aft through separate ports. The wing mainplanes are shoulder-mounted with leading edge sweepback apparent. A twin rudder configuration is seen at the tail (the planes being noticeably cranked outwards) and horizontal planes are fitted slightly aft. It is assumed that a tricycle undercarriage will be in play for ground-running. Internally, Fly-by-Wire (FbW) will provide control support and realtime corrections as well as supply the platform with high maneuverability.

The Turkish Defense Industry has been planning for an indigenous advanced jet trainer (as well as an indigenous combat fighter for that matter) since the latter part of the last decade. Negotiations with TAI then occurred to cover conceptual work and the project picked up steam in September of 2011. The subsequent years were set aside for studying the various facets of the project including ongoing (and future) Turkish Air Force operational needs, concept work and local industry capabilities intended to bring the aircraft to fruition.

The Turkish Air Force plans on acquiring around seventy Hurjets to succeed its aging fleet of T-38 trainers.




PROGRAM UPDATES

July 2018 - TAI unveiled a full-scale mockup of its Hurjet light-attack / advanced trainer aircraft at Farnborough 2018. Unlike earlier proposed mockup forms, which indicated a twin-engine layout, the new model sports a single turbofan engine. The model also showcased underwing stores of local Turkish design / origination.
MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 1000mph
Lo: 500mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (920mph).

    Graph average of 750 miles-per-hour.
Aviation Era
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Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
0
0

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
Graphical image of an aircraft air-to-surface missile
Graphical image of an aircraft anti-tank guided missile
Graphical image of an aircraft rocket pod
Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
Graphical image of an aircraft guided bomb munition
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.