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Yokosuka E14Y (Glen)

Submarine-borne Reconnaissance Floatplane Aircraft

Yokosuka E14Y (Glen)

Submarine-borne Reconnaissance Floatplane Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



Launched and recovered from specially-modified IJN submarines in World War 2, the E14Y is the only enemy aircraft to have dropped bombs on American soil.
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ORIGIN: Imperial Japan
YEAR: 1941
MANUFACTURER(S): Yokosuka Naval Air Technical Arsenal - Japanese Empire
PRODUCTION: 126
OPERATORS: Imperial Japan
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Yokosuka E14Y model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 2
LENGTH: 28.05 feet (8.55 meters)
WIDTH: 36.09 feet (11 meters)
HEIGHT: 12.53 feet (3.82 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 2,469 pounds (1,120 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 3,538 pounds (1,605 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Hitachi Tempu 12 series 9-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine developing 340 horsepower and driving a three-bladed propeller at the nose.
SPEED (MAX): 152 miles-per-hour (245 kilometers-per-hour; 132 knots)
RANGE: 547 miles (880 kilometers; 475 nautical miles)
CEILING: 17,782 feet (5,420 meters; 3.37 miles)




ARMAMENT



STANDARD:
1 x 7.7mm Type 92 machine gun in rear cockpit on flexible mounting.

OPTIONAL:
2 x 168lb drop bombs (typically incendiary).
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• E14Y "Glen" - Base Series Designation
• Type 0 Small Reconnaissance Seaplane - Official Imperial Japanese Navy designation for E14Y.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Yokosuka E14Y (Glen) Submarine-borne Reconnaissance Floatplane Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 9/12/2017. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) developed and operated a healthy stable of floatplanes and flying boats for its part in World War 2 (1939-1945). This was, of course, mostly out of necessity for the nation was made up of a series of islands with no direct land access to the target regions outside of Japan. Of particular note in their approach was the use of submarine-borne floatplanes which could be launched and recovered by specially-modified IJN attack submarines. One of this type of aircraft was the Yokosuka E14Y, known to the Allies as "Glen". It was produced in just 126 examples but its specialized mission role dictated that a small fleet of these aircraft was all that was necessary for their part in the war.

The Yokosuka Naval Air Technical Arsenal was responsible for the development and production of these relatively compact seaplanes. The design utilized a basic arrangement as floatplanes went: a monoplane wing was fitted low and forward and a traditional single-finned tail unit was installed aft. The crew of two sat in tandem under a heavily framed canopy over midships - the pilot in front and the navigator / rear gunner at the rear. The gunner has access to a single 7.7mm Type 92 machine gun which was mounted to a flexible arm, able to be stowed away when not in use. Beyond this, a modest bombload of 2 x 168lb bombs could be carried by the aircraft. The engine was installed at the nose in the usual way. For waterborne landings and take-offs, the aircraft was fitted with a pair of floats.




Power was from a single Hitachi "Tempu 12" 9-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine delivering 340 horsepower and driving a three-bladed propeller in puller fashion. Maximum achievable speed could reach 153 miles per hour while cruising was normally done near 105 miles per hour. Range was out to 550 miles and the aircraft's service ceiling reached 17,780 feet.

E14Y aircraft were designed to be enclosed in hangars added to attack submarines that included such types as the I-21 and I-25. The hangar facility was typically added to the front of the conning tower (sail) and allowed the submarine to retain its submersible capability and overall function. In this fashion, the boat could travel on the surface (or under it) in the usual way and, when required, completely surface to expose the hangar. The aircraft within was assembled and could be flown as normal, expanding the range of the submarine and providing important information from a bird's eye perspective. As the aircraft used floats for water-running, it could then be recovered and reused at a later time.

The E14Y has the distinction of several notable encounters over Allied terrain during World War 2. It is the only aircraft to have flown over the country of New Zealand when, in March of 1942, an E14Y photographed Allied forces at Wellington. This aircraft was launched from submarine I-25. Another, launched from I-21, flew over Auckland in late-May.

Perhaps the most notable of all the E14Y's actions was its flyover (and subsequent bombing) of the United States in what became known as "The Lookout Raid". This took place on September 9th, 1942 when an E14Y took off from I-25 near Brookings, Oregon. The two-crew and their aircraft flew over forested areas and dropped their incendiary bombs causing little damage but striking confusion and fear into the locals. This marked the only incident of enemy bombs being dropped on U.S. soil. No injuries were had but it was a bold initiative on the part of the Japanese - similar to America's "Doolittle Raid" on Tokyo itself in April of 1942 though on a much smaller scale.

E14Y aircraft operated until their value dwindled due to the changing fortunes of war (or their "host boats" were lost). Submarine I-21 was sunk in September of 1943 and I-21 followed in November. Three of the Type A1 submarines were completed from the five initially planned - these designed to carry the aircraft as well. All three were lost in the fighting of World War 2.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 200mph
Lo: 100mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (152mph).

    Graph average of 150 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
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Graph showcases the Yokosuka E14Y's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
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Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
126
126

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


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