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Martin MB-1 / Glenn Martin Bomber

Reconnaissance / Bomber Biplane Aircraft

Martin MB-1 / Glenn Martin Bomber

Reconnaissance / Bomber Biplane Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



Only nine Martin MB-1 series bombers were completed before the end of hostilities in World War 1.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United States
YEAR: 1918
STATUS: Retired, Out-of-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Glenn Martin Company (Martin) - USA
PRODUCTION: 22
OPERATORS: United States
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Martin MB-1 / Glenn Martin Bomber model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 3 or 4
LENGTH: 44.09 feet (13.44 meters)
WIDTH: 71.49 feet (21.79 meters)
HEIGHT: 14.70 feet (4.48 meters)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 10,223 pounds (4,637 kilograms)
ENGINE: 2 x Liberty 12-A engines developing 400 horsepower each.
SPEED (MAX): 104 miles-per-hour (168 kilometers-per-hour; 91 knots)
RANGE: 390 miles (627 kilometers; 339 nautical miles)
CEILING: 12,247 feet (3,733 meters; 2.32 miles)




ARMAMENT



STANDARD:
2 x 7.62mm Lewis machien guns in bow position
2 x 7.62mm Lewis machine guns in upper rear fuselage.
1 x 7.62mm Lewis machine gun in lower rear fuselage.

OPTIONAL:
Up to 2,000lb of ordnance
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• MB-1 - Martin Company Designation / Military Designation.
• GMB "Glen Martin Bomber" - United States Army Air Service designation for MB-1 series.
• GMT "Glenn Martin Transcontinental" - Fitted with fuel tanks for increased range.
• GMC "Glen Martin Canon" - Fitted with 1 x 37mm cannon replacing bow-mounted 7.62mm machine gun.
• GMP "Glenn Martin Passenger" - Accommodations for up to 10 passengers; redesignated to T-1.
• MBT "Martin Bombers - Torpedo" - Torpedo Bomber Variant; used by the United States Navy.
• MT "Martin Torpedo" - Used by the United States Navy; based on MB-1 system with wing assembly of MB-2 bombers; redesignated to TM-1.
• T-1 - GMP Redesignation
• TM-1 - MT Redesignation
• MB-1 / NBS-1 - "Improved" MB-1 Model Series


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Martin MB-1 / Glenn Martin Bomber Reconnaissance / Bomber Biplane Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 5/15/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Martin MB-1 (also known as the "Glenn Martin Bomber") became the first American-designed heavy bomber type to be purchased in quantity in the First World War, becoming the mainstay of the United States Army Air Service (USAAS) for a time. The system was a two-engine bomber of indigenous creation (previous US bombers were simply license production derivatives of European origin) and was designed by the Glenn Martin Company. In the end, only nine full-operational systems would become available by war's end but the type would soldier on until being replaced in 1920 by the more capable Martin MB-2 series.

Power was derived from two Liberty 12-A engines mounted between the upper and lower wing assemblies. Each engine developed a reported 400 horsepower and straddled the fuselage where three to four crewmembers were called upon to man the various open-cockpit stations. Armament was defensive and was made up of no fewer than 5 x 7.62mm machine guns in various positions about the fuselage including the bow nose mount. Offensive firepower consisted of up to 2,000lbs of ordnance. The undercarriage was of a fixed type and consisted of four wheels. First production examples were received in October of 1918.

The MB-1 was designed to replace the Handley-Page O/400 bomber series of British design and the Caproni bomber series of Italian design. The MB-1 came about at a time when the United States depended heavily on the purchase of foreign designs or all-out completed production models to maintain a workable military presence so the arrival of the MB-1 was quite a historic footnote for the nation. The system was called upon to fulfill the primary role of reconnaissance platform with a secondary role as a dedicated bomber. It would serve only a few short years in a military capacity before being replaced in frontline service by the aforementioned MB-2 series, which was in essence a further developed version of the MB-1 series.

A few modified MB-1 models existed and are worthy of note. These include an MB-1 with a 37mm cannon mounted in the 7.62mm bow-mount machine gun position. This particular MB-1 is designated as the GMC for "Glenn Martin Canon" and known by the serial AS62951. Additionally, the MB-1 with serial AS39059 sported a third Hispano-Suiza engine in the nose. A ten-passenger model existed as the GMP ("Glen Martin Passenger"). The MB-1 also served for a time as a mail carrier plane in the form of the T-1 in the post-war years.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 120mph
Lo: 60mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (104mph).

    Graph average of 90 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
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  LAX
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  NYC
Graph showcases the Martin MB-1 / Glenn Martin Bomber's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
22
22

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
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Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
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Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
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Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.