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Pilatus PC-9

Twin-Seat, Single-Engine Basic Trainer Aircraft

Pilatus PC-9

Twin-Seat, Single-Engine Basic Trainer Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



Developed from the Pilatus PC-7, the PC-9 serves as a basic and advanced two-seat trainer for many global operators.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Switzerland
YEAR: 1984
STATUS: Active, In-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Pilatus - Switzerland / Hawker de Havilland - Australia
PRODUCTION: 265
OPERATORS: Angola; Australia; Bulgaria; Croatia; Chad; Cyprus; Germany; Iraq; Ireland; Mexico; Myanmar; Oman; Saudi Arabia; Slovenia; Switzerland; Thailand; United Kingdom; United States
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Pilatus PC-9 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 2
LENGTH: 33.30 feet (10.15 meters)
WIDTH: 33.20 feet (10.12 meters)
HEIGHT: 10.66 feet (3.25 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 3,803 pounds (1,725 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 7,055 pounds (3,200 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-62 turboprop engine developing 1,150 horsepower.
SPEED (MAX): 370 miles-per-hour (595 kilometers-per-hour; 321 knots)
RANGE: 957 miles (1,540 kilometers; 832 nautical miles)
CEILING: 37,992 feet (11,580 meters; 7.20 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 4,100 feet-per-minute (1,250 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



OPTIONAL:
Conventional drop stores and gunpods across six underwing hardpoints (three to a wing).
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• PC-9 - Base Series Designation; original production model.
• PC-9/A - Basic trainer for the RAAF; 48 examples by Hawker de havilland.
• PC-9B - Target-tower for German Air Force
• PC-9M - Model of 1997; revised tail fin and wingroots.
• Beech Pilatus PC-9 Mk.2 - Joint marketing for the JPATS program, becoming the Raytheon Texan II trainer for the USAF and USN services.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Pilatus PC-9 Twin-Seat, Single-Engine Basic Trainer Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 8/24/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Pilatus PC-9 is a successful twin-seat basic training aircraft used in military circles to provide future pilots and combat airmen their first taste of flight. The aircraft emerged from Swiss-based Pilatus Aircraft in the mid-1980s and has found global respect from flyers despite its modest production total of 265 units. The type, developed from the earlier PC-7 model of similar form and function, went on to form the basis of the American Beechcraft / Raytheon T-6 "Texan II" basic trainer (detailed on this site) currently used by the U.S. military.

A first-flight of the PC-9 was had on May 7th, 1984 and certification followed in September of 1985. Production has been ongoing since 1984. Military operators have ranged from Angola and Australia to Thailand and the United States.

The arrangement of the PC-9 is conventional with a straight-wing mainplane configuration used. The mainplanes are seated at midships as is the tandem-seat cockpit sporting a large, curved canopy offering excellent vision out-of-the-cockpit. The cockpit sits aft of a long nose section housing the single engine installation. The tail unit showcases a single vertical tail fin and low-set horizontal planes. The undercarriage, wholly-retractable, utilizes two single-wheeled main legs (under each wing element) and a single-wheeled nose leg. Internally, the cockpits are a mix of steam-style gauges and display units. The control stick is at center, between the knees, and the throttle is set to portside. Controls are doubled for student and instructor positions. Both airmen are afforded ejection seats.

Variants include the basic, and original, PC-9 model. The PC-9/A became a basic trainer for the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) and was built locally under license by Hawker de Havilland. The PC-9B was a two-seat target-tower for the German Air Force and the PC-9M followed in 1997. The M-model introduced a revised tail fin and wingroots as well as other subtle changes.

The PC-9M featured an empty weight of 3,805lb against an MTOW of 5,180lb. Power is from a Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-62 turboprop engine developing 1,150 horsepower providing speeds of 370 miles per hour with a range out to 955 miles and a service ceiling up to 38,000 feet. Rate-of-climb is 4,100 feet-per-minute.

Pilatus then teamed with American-based Beechcraft to offer the PC-9 Mk.2 for the JPATS program. This model became the T-6A Texan II in service with the USAF and USN.

While typically unarmed, the PC-9 has three hardpoints under each wing and can carry various load outs for training purposes or light strike sorties.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 400mph
Lo: 200mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (370mph).

    Graph average of 300 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the Pilatus PC-9's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
265
265

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
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Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
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Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
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Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.