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Bell UH-1Y Venom (Super Huey)

Medium-Lift Utility / Transport Helicopter

Bell UH-1Y Venom (Super Huey)

Medium-Lift Utility / Transport Helicopter

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Bell UH-1Y Venom - in service with the USMC - is a comprehensive upgrade to the Bell Helicopter UH-1 Huey line.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: United States
YEAR: 2009
STATUS: Active, In-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Bell Helicopter - USA
PRODUCTION: 92
OPERATORS: United States
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Bell UH-1Y Venom model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 58.33 feet (17.78 meters)
WIDTH: 48.82 feet (14.88 meters)
HEIGHT: 14.76 feet (4.5 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 11,839 pounds (5,370 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 18,519 pounds (8,400 kilograms)
ENGINE: 2 x General Electric T700-GE-401C turboshaft engines developing 1,828 horsepower each and driving a four-bladed main rotor and four-bladed tail rotor.
SPEED (MAX): 190 miles-per-hour (305 kilometers-per-hour; 165 knots)
RANGE: 298 miles (480 kilometers; 259 nautical miles)
CEILING: 20,013 feet (6,100 meters; 3.79 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 2,520 feet-per-minute (768 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



Typically none though can be equipped with the following: 2 x 70mm (2.75") Hydra 70 OR APKWS II rocket pods; 2 x 7.62mm M240D GPMG on pintle mountings at doors; 2 x 12.7mm GAU-16/A Gatling Guns on pintle mountings at doors; 2 x 7.62mm GAU-17/A Gatling Guns on pintle mountings at doors.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• UH-1Y "Venom" - Base Series Designation


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Bell UH-1Y Venom (Super Huey) Medium-Lift Utility / Transport Helicopter.  Entry last updated on 6/22/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The United States Marine Corps (USMC) has been committed to the Bell UH-1 "Huey" platform for decades. In its original form, the helicopter debuted in 1959 and saw considerable action in the Vietnam War (1955-1975). In time, the service branch upgraded to the UH-1N "Twin Huey" model of twin-engine layout promising better performance and broadened mission capabilities. These arrived in 1969 and went on serve the host country as well as a slew of foreign operators.

Requiring a new, all-modern multirole transport type at the end of the last century, USMC authorities began reviewing available viable options. This evolved a new modernization program to cover work on both the AH-1W "SuperCobra" attack helicopter platform and the UH-1N "Twin Hueys". In 1996, Bell Helicopter was formally handed the contract and the result of this endeavor produced the AH-1Z "Viper" attack form and the UH-1Y "Venom" transport (the latter also known as the "Super Huey"). The contract was originally slated to cover modifications to existing Huey helicopters but this eventually became a commitment to new-build units - ninety-two having been completed to date (2017).

Part of the program was to reduce maintenance and repair costs while also improving logistical friendliness so several measures were taken by Bell to fulfill this end of the requirement. The two helicopters share the same powerplants (including transmission), avionics, all-glass instrument panels (as well as the software) and tailboom assemblies. Additionally, the two-bladed main rotors of the Twin Hueys have been given up in favor of a composite structure showcasing four total blades. The result is a more efficient and powerful rotary-wing system that works favorably in conjunction with the modified Viper attack platform for, between the two designs, there is nearly 85% commonality of parts.

The helicopter is crewed by up to two pilots seated side-by-side aft of the short nose cone with good vision out-of-the-cockpit thanks to oversized windshields. Entry-exit is by way of hinged automobile-style doors along the fuselage sides. Aft of this section is the passenger compartment which is given large, rectangular sliding entry/exit doors. The twin engine compartment is fitted over the roof and these systems drive the main rotor blade overhead as well as the four-bladed rotor unit at the tail (set to portside). Horizontal planes are set well-aft along the tail boom. The undercarriage is a simple four-point skid arrangement. An optics set is fitted to the "chin" position of the aircraft and the fuselage supports two outboard hardpoints for rocket or gun pods. The door positions can also mount machine guns or Gatling Guns atop pintle systems. In this way, the UH-1Y can be fielded as a gunship.

The Super Huey is powered by 2 x General Electric T700-GE-401C turboshaft engines developing up to 1,828 horsepower. Of note are the large suppression covers installed at each engine's exhaust port. The Venom is capable of speeds nearing 230 miles per hour with a cruising speed close to 190 mph. It features a mission endurance of over three hours and can reach a service ceiling up to 20,000 feet while sporting a rate-of-climb of 2,520 feet-per-minute.

Testing of Viper prototypes spanned from 2006 to 2008 and the series was formally in-service at the beginning of 2009 - ready to partake in American-led actions in Iraq. Nine total squadrons of the USMC now field the Venom. These are actively replacing the fleet of UH-1N Twin Hueys in still service.




PROGRAM UPDATES

October 2017 - The U.S. State Department has approved the sale of the UH-1Y Venom helicopter to the Czech Republic. The Czech Republic is seeking to replace its aging fleet of Mil Mi-24 transport-assault helicopters in the same role through a 12-strong order. Other candidates in the running are the Sikorsky UH-60M / S-70i, the Leonardo AW139M and the Airbus Helicopters H125M.
MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 200mph
Lo: 100mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (190mph).

    Graph average of 150 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
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LDN
 
  PAR
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  BER
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  MSK
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  TKY
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  SYD
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  LAX
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  NYC
Graph showcases the Bell UH-1Y Venom's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
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Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
92
92

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
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Graphical image of an aircraft rocket pod
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