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Bayraktar TB2


Medium-Altitude, Long-Endurance (MALE) Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV)


The Bayraktar TB2 marks the first indigenous armed UAV system for the nation of Turkey - it has been used effectively against PKK fighters.
Authored By: Staff Writer | Edited: 5/13/2019
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Specifications


Year: 2015
Status: Active, Limited Service
Manufacturer(s): Kale-Baykar Makina - Turkey
Production: 65
Capabilities: Ground Attack; Reconnaissance (RECCE); Unmanned;
Crew: 0
Length: 36.75 ft (11.2 m)
Width: 39.37 ft (12 m)
Height: 10.50 ft (3.2 m)
Weight (Empty): 926 lb (420 kg)
Weight (MTOW): 1,433 lb (650 kg)
Power: 1 x Conventional engine driving propeller unit at rear of fuselage.
Speed: 155 mph (250 kph; 135 kts)
Ceiling: 27,001 feet (8,230 m; 5.11 miles)
Range: 3,728 miles (6,000 km; 3,240 nm)
Operators: Qatar; Turkey; Ukraine
With Turkish officials acknowledging the operational-level service of the Bayraktar TB2, Turkey becomes just the sixth nation in the world to field a viable Unmanned Aerial Combat Vehicle (UCAV). It joined the United States, China, Pakistan, Israel and Iran in the field. These platforms offer considerable advantages when compared to their Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) brethren - least of these being an armed ability to seek out and destroy ground elements with precision strikes without exposing human airmen or their very expensive flying machines to danger.

The TB2 is based on the earlier Bayraktar Tactical UAS first flown in 2009 and introduced in 2014. The TB2 is the "armed reconnaissance" form and has already seen successful action against PKK (Kurdistan Workers Party) forces - the series' first "kill" was recorded on September 8th, 2016 and many more have followed since.

Turkey has tried, for years, to secure foreign-born UCAV platforms, from the United States and elsewhere, to no avail. As such it turned to local industry to develop an indigenous solution to an indigenous problem and this has led to several notable products emerging: the TAI Anka (detailed elsewhere on this site) and the TB2. The TB2 gained steam in 2015 as a weapons-delivery capability was fleshed out for the Bayraktar Tactical UAS. This led to trials in late 2015 and formal introduction for service in 2016. With all of the work being local in nature, Turkey bypasses any strict arms regulations generally encountered with foreign purchases. Additionally, the TB2 can be evolved as Turkish military needs require making for a more effective long-term solution.

The finalized TB2 sees straight wing mainplanes positioned at midships and aft of a sleek nosecone assembly. The engine is fitted at the rear of the fuselage within a well-contoured housing - aspiration of the powerplant is through small slits on the housing surfaces. The engine powers a two-bladed propeller unit in "pusher" configuration. A twin-boom tail design is used to help clear the engine installation and its propeller. The booms are slim and emanate from the wing root trailing edges, joined together at the rear of the aircraft by conjoined, inward-cranked vertical tail fins also serving as de facto horizontal planes. The wheeled undercarriage is fixed in flight and an optics blister is seen at the ventral line of the fuselage.

By all accounts, the TB2 utilizes proven UAV design and construction practices - from its external arrangement to its internal make-up. It is further classified as a Medium-Altitude, Long-Endurance (MALE) unmanned system. Operators pilot the aircraft from Ground Control Stations (GCSs) and some autonomous capability is built into the flying component.

The aircraft features a pair of hardpoints under the wings, one per wing, that allow for the carrying of various ordnance types including Anti-Tank Guided Missiles (ATGMs) as well as Laser-Guided Bombs (LGBs). All this adds to the precision strike capability so sought after by today's militaries. Beyond the ability to self-designate and strike at ground targets, the series has also been used to laser-designate missile targets for Turkish Army attack helicopters like the American-made HueyCobra.

Program Updates



December 2015 - The TB2 successfully tested the UMTAS anti-tank missile on December 17th, 2015.

April 2018 - Qatar has become the first foreign global operator of the Bayraktar TB2 UAV. The fleet will number six air systems coupled with three Ground Control Stations (GCSs).

November 2018 - It was revealed that the nation of Ukraine has procured the Turkish Bayraktar TB2 UAV.






Armament



Up to 55 kilograms of mission equipment.

For Attack Role:
2 x UMTAS Anti-Tank Guided Missiles (ATGMs) carried underwing.

Future support planned for MAM-L 50lb Laser-Guided Bomb (LGB) Small Micro Munition (SMM) precision-guided drop bombs.

Graphical image of an aircraft anti-tank guided missile
Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
Graphical image of an aircraft guided bomb munition

Variants / Models



• TB2 - Base Series Designation; based on unarmed Bayraktar Tactical UAS platform; provision for air-launched guided munitions.
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