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de Havilland Canada DHC-4 Caribou

Tactical Transport Aircraft

de Havilland Canada DHC-4 Caribou

Tactical Transport Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The United States military was the primary user of the Canadian Caribou aircraft - which went on to serve with distinction in the Vietnam War.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Canada
YEAR: 1959
MANUFACTURER(S): de Havilland Aircraft of Canada, LTD - Canada
PRODUCTION: 307
OPERATORS: Australia; Costa Rica; Liberia; Malaysia; Canada; Columbia; India; Spain; Tanzania; North Vietnam; United States
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the de Havilland Canada DHC-4A Caribou model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 3 + 32
LENGTH: 72.60 feet (22.13 meters)
WIDTH: 95.64 feet (29.15 meters)
HEIGHT: 31.76 feet (9.68 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 18,283 pounds (8,293 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 31,295 pounds (14,195 kilograms)
ENGINE: 2 x Pratt & Whitney R-2000-7M2 14-cylinder twin row radial piston engines developing 1,450 shp.
SPEED (MAX): 216 miles-per-hour (347 kilometers-per-hour; 187 knots)
RANGE: 1,308 miles (2,105 kilometers; 1,137 nautical miles)
CEILING: 24,800 feet (7,559 meters; 4.70 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 1,355 feet-per-minute (413 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



None.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• YAC-1 - US Army Evaluation Model Designation of which 5 examples were ordered.
• AC-1A - Initial Production Model Designation later changed to CV-2B, then to C-7A.
• CV-2B - US Army Series Designation
• C-7A - US Air Force Series Designation
• DHC-4A - Australian Base Model Series Designation.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the de Havilland Canada DHC-4 Caribou Tactical Transport Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 8/30/2017. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Caribou series proved to be such an effective battlefield transport aircraft that more than a few were pressed into service as captured C-7's in the hands of the North Vietnamese. The type continues to serve in limited numbers and was seen in action as recent as 2000 with Australian forces in East Timor. By 1973, the Caribou series would see over 300 examples produced.

The Caribou was a twin-engine design undertaken by de Havilland Canada as a private project with hopes of enticing the military forces of both Canada and the United States of America. The initial design was designated as the DHC-4 and was engineered with short take-off and landing (STOL) capabilities in mind and was a naturally rugged design to boot, making most enticing to the United States Army, which went on to order five evaluation models as the YAC-1. From there, the Caribou emerged as a production model in the AC-1 series which would later become the CV-2. By the time the United States Air Force took over control of the Caribou aircraft in early 1967, the designation was changed once again to the more identifiable C-7 series.




de Havilland Canada DHC-4 Caribou (Cont'd)

Tactical Transport Aircraft

de Havilland Canada DHC-4 Caribou (Cont'd)

Tactical Transport Aircraft



At its core, the Caribou was powered by two Pratt & Whitney brand engines generating 1,450shp (DHC-4). Engines were mounted on a high-wing / straight-wing monoplane assembly allowing for optimal ground clearance around the fuselage and especially the three-bladed propeller systems. A large cargo hold door was mounted to the rear part of the main fuselage with the single-rudder tail assembly extending past and over the loading area door. Hold capabilities were very generous and could allow for the transport of 32 troops, 22 medevac litters, 2 vehicles or up to 4 tons of cargo in the form of equipment, supplies or artillery systems.

In the end, the United States became the largest operator of the Caribou system in operation with both the United States Army and the United States Air Force. Australia also operated (and in some cases continues to do so) the type along with Canada, Spain, Columbia and India among others. The system proved quite capable in the rugged Vietnamese battlefront and was a highly prized vehicle for having the ability to land on short airstrips to deliver supplies / manpower and retrieve the wounded.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 300mph
Lo: 150mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (216mph).

    Graph average of 225 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the de Havilland Canada DHC-4A Caribou's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
307
307

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.