Military Factory logo
Icon of a dollar sign
Icon of military officer saluting
Icon of F-15 Eagle military combat fighter aircraft
Icon of Abrams Main Battle Tank
Icon of AK-47 assault rifle
Icon of navy warships

Petlyakov VI-100

Heavy Twin-Engine Interceptor Prototype Aircraft

Petlyakov VI-100

Heavy Twin-Engine Interceptor Prototype Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Petlyakov VI-100 heavy interceptor was a well-armed and aerodynamically-refined aircraft for its time but changing requirements for the Soviet Air Force led to its rebirth as the Pe-2 dive bomber.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Soviet Union
YEAR: 1940
MANUFACTURER(S): Petlyakov - Soviet Union
PRODUCTION: 1
OPERATORS: Soviet Union (cancelled)
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Petlyakov VI-100 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 2
LENGTH: 41.01 feet (12.5 meters)
WIDTH: 56.30 feet (17.16 meters)
HEIGHT: 11.48 feet (3.5 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 11,905 pounds (5,400 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 16,006 pounds (7,260 kilograms)
ENGINE: 2 x Klimov M-105 turbocharged inline piston engines developing 1,050 horsepower each.
SPEED (MAX): 332 miles-per-hour (535 kilometers-per-hour; 289 knots)
RANGE: 870 miles (1,400 kilometers; 756 nautical miles)
CEILING: 40,026 feet (12,200 meters; 7.58 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 2,415 feet-per-minute (736 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



2 x 20mm ShVAK cannons in fixed, forward-firing position at nose.
2 x 7.62mm ShKAS machine guns in fixed, forward-firing position at nose.
1 x 7.62mm ShKAS machine gun on flexible mount in rear cockpit.

OPTIONAL:
Coventional drop bombs and rockets held at underwing racks.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• VI-100 - Base Series Designation; single prototype completed.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Petlyakov VI-100 Heavy Twin-Engine Interceptor Prototype Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 5/7/2017. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
There were only a handful of truly exceptional twin-engine heavy fighters fielded during World War 2 (1939-1945) - the British de Havilland "Mosquito" and American Lockheed "Lightning" quickly come to mind and these were joined by others such as the German Messerschmitt Bf 110, which found its success early in the war, and the Japanese went on to manufacture a plethora of twin-engined types for their part in the grand conflict. The Petlyakov concern of the Soviet Union eventually contributed its Pe-2 dive bomber of 1941 but this platform had origins in a potent design intended as a high-altitude interceptor in the pre-war years.

Born as the "VI-100", the aircraft was expected to fulfill a growing need within the Soviet Air Force to counter high-flying enemy threats of the period - primarily bombers. Design work began in 1938 and the resulting design became a well-streamlined, twin-seat, all-metal, twin-engine offering. The crew of two were seated in line in separate cockpits (back-to-back). The wings were of monoplane arrangement and each held an engine nacelle at their leading edge. The tail was of a split-rudder configuration and the undercarriage of a "tail-dragger" form consistent with the period. The pilot's position was aft of a short nosecone containing a bulk of the offensive armament with defensive armament handled by the rear crewman. The pilot's cockpit was to be pressurized for high-altitude service. The powerplant of choice became 2 x Klimov M-105 inline piston engines of 1,050 horsepower. For the required high-altitude performance, these were fitted with turbo-superchargers.




In terms of armament needed to hunt down enemy bombers, the VI-100 was to be a well-armed flying machine. Primary armament was fitted in the nose as 2 x 20mm ShVAK cannons with 2 x 7.62mm ShKAS machine guns in fixed, forward-firing mounts. The rear gunner managed a single 7.62mm ShKAS machine gun along a trainable mounting to protect the aircraft's vulnerable "six". There was also thought given to bomb racks held underwing to broaden the tactical usefulness of this aircraft.

Despite the promising nature of the design, there proved insurmountable delays in attaining the necessary pressurized cockpit equipment and thusly the initial prototype was first-flown on December 22nd, 1939 sans this fit while also lacking the intended turbo-superchargers. In testing the aircraft showcased a maximum speed of 332 miles per hour with an estimated range out to 870 miles and operating service ceiling of 40,000 feet. Performance would have been enhanced with the addition of the turbo-superchargers with a maximum speed of 385 mph predicted.

With World War 2 having begun in September of 1939, the VI-100 now came under the microscope as a wartime product. It was showcased (on the ground) during a Soviet parade in May of 1940 at which point the high-altitude requirement was all but dissipating. Instead, the VI-100 was transformed to become the PB-100 to fulfill a standing dive bomber requirement and entered production (and subsequent Soviet service) as the "Pe-2" leaving the VI-100 as nothing more than a footnote in Soviet Air Force history. The follow-up Pe-3 heavy fighter appeared in 1941 as another twin-engine design by the company and managed a production total of 360 units. These fought on through to the end of the war in 1945 and were also fielded in the night-fighter role.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 400mph
Lo: 200mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (332mph).

    Graph average of 300 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the Petlyakov VI-100's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
1
1

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
Graphical image of an aircraft medium machine gun
Graphical image of an aircrat automatic cannon
Graphical image of aircraft aerial rockets
Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.