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Yokosuka P1Y1 Ginga (Frances)

Light-Medium Bomber / Dive Bomber / Torpedo Bomber / Night-Fighter

Yokosuka P1Y1 Ginga (Frances)

Light-Medium Bomber / Dive Bomber / Torpedo Bomber / Night-Fighter

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



A late entry into World War 2 for the Japanese Navy, the Yokosuka P1Y failed to make much of an impact despite over 1,000 examples produced.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Imperial Japan
YEAR: 1944
STATUS: Retired, Out-of-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Yokosuka Naval Air Technical Arsenal / Nakajima / Kawanishi - Imperial Japan
PRODUCTION: 1,102
OPERATORS: Imperial Japan
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Yokosuka P1Y1a model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 3
LENGTH: 49.21 feet (15 meters)
WIDTH: 65.62 feet (20 meters)
HEIGHT: 14.11 feet (4.3 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 16,017 pounds (7,265 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 29,762 pounds (13,500 kilograms)
ENGINE: 2 x Nakajima NK9C Homare 12 18-cylinder radial piston engines developing 1,825 horsepower each driving three-bladed propeller units.
SPEED (MAX): 342 miles-per-hour (550 kilometers-per-hour; 297 knots)
RANGE: 3,337 miles (5,370 kilometers; 2,900 nautical miles)
CEILING: 30,840 feet (9,400 meters; 5.84 miles)




ARMAMENT



STANDARD:
1 x 20mm Type 99 cannon in nose position
1 x 13mm Type 2 heavy machine gun in rear-facing trainable position.

OPTIONAL:
Up to 2.205lb of conventional drop stores OR 1 x 1,800lb torpedo.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• P1Y1 "Ginga" - Base Series Designation; medium bomber form.
• P1Y1a - Nakajima Homare 12 engines; 1 x 13mm machine gun in aft-facing position.
• P1Y1b - Developed from P1Y1a; Nakajima Homare 12 engines; 2 x 13mm machine guns in aft-facing position.
• P1Y1c - Developed from P1Y1b; Nakajima Homare 12 engines; 1 x 13mm defensive machine gun; single example completed.
• P1Y1 Model 11 - Night-fighter development based on P1Y1; 2 x 20mm Type 99 cannons.
• P1Y1-S - Night-fighter development; 4 x 20mm cannons in two obliquely-angled positions, one fitted fore and the other aft of cockpit; 1 x 13mm machine gun in aft position for defense.
• P1Y1 Attacker - Ground attack model; 20 x 20mm Type 99 cannons in ventral bay; 30 examples completed.
• P1Y2-S "Kyokko" - Night-fighter variant; 96 examples built from the P1Y1.
• P1Y2 - Developed from P1Y2-S nigth-fighter; Mitsubishi Kasei 25 engines.
• P1Y2a - Developed from P1Y1a; Mitsubishi Kasei 25 engines.
• P1Y2b - Developed from P1Y1b; Mitsubishi Kasei 25 engines.
• P1Y2c - Developed from P1Y1c; Mitsubishi Kasei 25 engines.
• P1Y3 - Developed from P1Y1; Nakajima Homare 21 engines.
• P1Y4 - Developed from P1Y1; Nakajima Homare 23 engines
• P1Y5 - Developed from P1Y1; Mitsubishi Ha-43 engines
• P1Y6 - Developed from P1Y2; Mitsubishi Kasai 25 engines
• Model 33 - Long-range bomber variant; 4-person crew and bombload of 3,000kg; not pursued.
• "Tenga" - Proposed jet-powered bomber form of 1945
• MXY10 - Decoy bomber; non-flying


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Yokosuka P1Y1 Ginga (Frances) Light-Medium Bomber / Dive Bomber / Torpedo Bomber / Night-Fighter.  Entry last updated on 10/23/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The twin-engine combat platform proved popular with the forces of the Japanese Empire during World War 2 (1939-1945) - they offered capable bomb loads, strong performance, and the operational ranges needed to cover the vast reaches of the Pacific. One mid-war twin-engine bomber development became the Yokosuka P1Y "Ginga" (meaning "Galaxy") which was developed for the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) but intended for service from established land bases. Production reached 1,102 units before war's end. The Allies codenamed the bomber "Frances".

The Yokosuka Naval Air Technical Arsenal pushed for a new modern combining the operational range, firepower, and performance of the best platforms then available to the IJN. In additional to conventional level bombing, it was thought to include a capability for dive bombing and torpedo bombing to make for a more multi-faceted battlefield performer. Engineers elected for a conventional monoplane design form incorporating the two engines at each wing leading edge. The nose section of the aircraft was glazed for good vision out-of-the-cockpit and for bombing. The wing mainplanes were mid-mounted appendages and the tail given a traditional single-rudder form. A "tail-dragger" undercarriage was used. The operating crew would number three. Dimensions included a length of 49 feet, a wingspan of 65.5 feet and a height of 14 feet. Empty weight was 16,000lb against a Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) of 29,765lb.

The engines were 2 x Nakajima NK9C "Homare 12" series 18-cylinder radial piston engines of 1,825 horsepower each. Performance specifications included a maximum speed of 340 miles per hour, a cruising speed of 230 miles per hour, a range out to 3,340 miles, and a service ceiling up to 30,840 feet.

Beyond the internal bombload of 2,205lb (or 1 x 1,800lb torpedo), the aircraft typically carried defensive armament in the form of 1 x 20mm Type 99 cannon in the nose and 1 x 13mm Type 2 heavy machine gun facing aft on a trainable mounting).




A first-flight of a P1Y prototype occurred during August 1943 and this led to a contract order for 1,002 aircraft which came from Nakajima factories. Twelve total prototypes were eventually constructed testing and mainly carried the Homare 11 series radial. Production yielded variants from the original P1Y1 with Homare 11 or Homare 12 engines to the thirty P1Y1 ground attack forms (these fitted 20 x 20mm Type 99 cannons to specifically target American B-29s on the ground). A non-flying ground replica for decoy purposes was also built under the "MXY10" designator. Production peaked in 1944 with 620 examples of all variants delivered and a further 434 followed during the first half of 1945.

Introduction of the P1Y was during October 1944 and the type saw combat service until the end of the war in August of 1945. By this time, the Japanese situation had deteriorated enough to showcase the P1Y bombers as kamikaze weapons against Allied warships. This proved the case during the Okinawa assault that helped pave the way for the Japanese surrender. At the end of the war, at least three P1Y examples were delivered to the United States for testing.

One notable offshoot of the P1Y program became the P1Y2 "Kyokko" ("Aurora") which was a night-fighter / night-intruder version of the original. Kawanishi handled manufacture of 96 of this aircraft which carried Mitsubishi Kasei engines (due to the growing scarcity of the Homare engines) and were fitted with radar kits. Armament included an oblique-firing system which allowed for attacking bombers from their more vulnerable bellies. However, this design failed to produce the needed performance to assail enemy Boeing B-29 Superfortresses and were therefore reconfigured to their traditional bomber roles before the end.

Over twenty IJN squadrons fielded the P1Y including the 302nd Kokutai which became the sole night-fighter group.




MEDIA







General Assessment (BETA)
Firepower  
Performance  
Survivability  
Versatility  
Impact  


Values are derrived from a variety of categories related to the design, overall function, and historical influence of this aircraft in aviation history.
MF Power Rating (BETA)
78
The MF Power Rating takes into account over sixty individual factors related to this aircraft entry. The rating is out of 100 total possible points.
Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 400mph
Lo: 200mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (342mph).

    Graph average of 300 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
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  BER
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  MSK
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  TKY
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  SYD
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  NYC
Graph showcases the Yokosuka P1Y1a's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
1102
1102

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
Graphical image of an aircraft medium machine gun
Graphical image of an aircrat automatic cannon
Graphical image of an aircraft aerial torpedo
Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
Commitments / Honors
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Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
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Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.