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Tachikawa Ki-106 (Ki-84 Hayate)

All-Wood Single-Seat Fighter Prototype

Tachikawa Ki-106 (Ki-84 Hayate)

All-Wood Single-Seat Fighter Prototype

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
IMAGES
Overview



The Tachikawa Ki-106 was an all-wooden form of the classic Nakajima Ki-94 Hayate fighter line.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Imperial Japan
YEAR: 1945
STATUS: Cancelled
MANUFACTURER(S): Tachikawa Hikoki / Ohjo Koku - Imperial Japan
PRODUCTION: 3
OPERATORS: Imperial Japan (cancelled)
National flag of Imperial Japan
JPN
Technical Specifications



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Tachikawa Ki-106 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
POWER: 1 x Nakajima Ha-45-21 radial piston engine developing 2,000 horsepower.
ADVERTISEMENTS
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Armament



STANDARD:
2 x 20mm cannons in wings
Graphical image of an aircrat automatic cannon
Variants / Models



• Ki-106 - Base Series Designation; three prototypes completed.


History



Detailing the development and operational history of the Tachikawa Ki-106 (Ki-84 Hayate) All-Wood Single-Seat Fighter Prototype.  Entry last updated on 2/8/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
Because of the deteriorating war situation for Japan amidst the relentless Allied bombing campaign of the Japanese homeland, high-performance aircraft of all sorts were sought to contend with the new generation of Allied fighters and the arrival of the American Boeing B-29 "Superfortress" high-altitude heavy bomber. The Nakajima Ki-84 "Hayate" represented one of the finer mid-to-late-war fighters available to the nation and went on to see 3,514 examples produced while being regarded as the best quantitatively-available Japanese fighter of the entire conflict. It was decided to develop a low-cost, all-wood version of this fighter to reduce the reliance on valuable alloys and other precious war material needed elsewhere. This initiative became the forgotten Tachikawa "Ki-106".

The requirement appeared in September of 1943 and was assigned to Tachikawa Hikoki engineers. Their mission was to redesign the classic Ki-84 into a fully wooden form with assistance given through the Army Aerotechnical Research Institute. Beyond its all-wood construction, the aircraft was simplified for low-skilled labor to be employed in its construction process essentially making the Ki-106 a budget fighter able to be built in just about anyplace resembling a common wood shop. Final assembly would require slightly more skilled labor but the end result would be an easier-to-produce fighter platform desperately in need by the air services of Japan.




The Ki-106 mimicked much of the form and function of the all-metal Ki-84 before it. Ohjo Koku handled construction of the prototypes to which the first (of three) flew in July of 1945. The protracted development of the product meant that it did not go airborne until very late in the war when Japanese losses were insurmountable. Power came from a single Nakajima Ha-45-21 series radial piston engine driving a three-bladed propeller through 2,000 horsepower output. Wing mainplanes were featured forward of midships as in the Ki-84 and the cockpit was held over center. Armament was reduced from the 4 x 20mm cannon arrangement seen in the Ki-84 to a 2 x 20mm cannon battery as a weight-saving measure (the all-wood construction of the Ki-106 made it heavier than the all-metal form).

The three prototypes were all that was built of the Ki-106 line for the Japanese surrender of 1945 ended development of this Japanese "wooden wonder". The second prototype managed to go airborne just before the cessation of hostilities and was outfitted with its proposed armament scheme showing some progress.






Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed
Hi: 400mph
Lo: 200mph
This entry's maximum listed speed (385mph).

Graph average of 300 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
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LDN
 
  PAR
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  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
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  SYD
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  LAX
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  NYC
Graph showcases the Tachikawa Ki-106's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production (3)
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
3
3

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.


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