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Mitsubishi Ki-83

Twin-Engine Heavy Fighter Prototype

Mitsubishi Ki-83

Twin-Engine Heavy Fighter Prototype

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The end of the war in 1945 brought about an end to the promising Mitsubishi Ki-83 twin-seat, twin-engine heavy fighter.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Imperial Japan
YEAR: 1945
MANUFACTURER(S): Mitsubishi - Imperial Japan
PRODUCTION: 4
OPERATORS: Imperial Japan (cancelled)
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Mitsubishi Ki-83 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 2
LENGTH: 41.01 feet (12.5 meters)
WIDTH: 50.85 feet (15.5 meters)
HEIGHT: 15.09 feet (4.6 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 13,184 pounds (5,980 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 20,790 pounds (9,430 kilograms)
ENGINE: 2 x Mitsubishi Ha-211 Ru (Ha-43) 18-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines developing 2,070 horsepower each.
SPEED (MAX): 438 miles-per-hour (705 kilometers-per-hour; 381 knots)
RANGE: 1,215 miles (1,955 kilometers; 1,056 nautical miles)
CEILING: 41,339 feet (12,600 meters; 7.83 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 3,280 feet-per-minute (1,000 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



STANDARD:
2 x 30mm cannons in nose
2 x 20mm cannons in nose
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Ki-83 - Base Project Designation; four prototypes completed.
• Ki-95 - Proposed fast-reconnaissance variant; not produced.
• Ki-103 - Related development; not furthered.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Mitsubishi Ki-83 Twin-Engine Heavy Fighter Prototype.  Entry last updated on 9/1/2015. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The Japanese held a talent for developing excellent twin-engined aircraft during World War 2 (1939-1945). The Kawasaki Ki-45 "Toryu" was produced in over 1,700 examples from late 1941 on and the Ki-46 "Dinah", used in the fast-reconnaissance role, was another example seeing similar production totals and service life. The latter design was from Tomio Kubo and, following the success of this product, Kubo an his design team tried their hand at a single-engine, single-seat long-range escort fighter in the Mitsubishi Ki-73 - an aircraft utilizing a 24-cylinder, 2,600 horsepower inline engine driving two three-bladed propeller units in a contra-rotating arrangement in the nose.

However, issues with the engine doomed the Ki-73 and this led to Kubo and his team to work on an all-new twin-engine heavy fighter design to fulfill a 1943 requirement for such an aircraft - the key quality being inherently good operational range. A typical form was selected which saw a centralized fuselage straddled by the engine nacelles fitted to each wing element. The wing mainplanes were fitted well-forward of midships. The two-seat cockpit was held at front and the fuselage tapered to the rear, the tail consisting of a sole vertical fin with mid-mounted horizontal planes. Each engine nacelle was underslung and spanned from before the wing leading edges to beyond the wing trailing edges. A "tail dragger" undercarriage was used. Each engine would drive a four-blade propeller.

First flight was had on November 18th, 1944and the design immediately proved itself a strong platform with good handling characteristics and agility. Power came from 2 x Mitsubishi Ha-211 "Ru" 18-cylinder air-cooled radial engines outputting at 2,070 horsepower each. As a fighter, the aircraft was slated to carry a formidable front-facing array of 2 x 30mm and 2 x 20mm cannons in the nose - giving it a potent punch against any and all Allied fighters and bombers of the period. Performance specifications indicated a fast mount with a maximum listed speed of 440 miles per hour. Cruising speeds would be closer to 280mph. Operational range was out to 1,215 miles and a service ceiling of 41,500 feet being reported.

For its time, the Ki-83 represented one of the more advanced project aircraft capable of making a difference in Japanese fortunes in the war. However, the Allied bombing campaign of the Japanese homeland truly restricted what could be had and what could not. Four prototypes of the Ki-83 were ultimately realized but the Japanese surrender of August 1945 derailed any and all hopes for the line to see serial production reached. In the immediate post-war period, the Ki-83 was studied extensively by American researchers who knew nothing of the aircraft's existence until after the war.

Beyond the stated Ki-83 version, there were plans for two primary offshoots to emerge - the Ki-95 and the Ki-103. The Ki-93 is known to have been along the lines of a fast-reconnaissance platform but was never built.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 500mph
Lo: 250mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (438mph).

    Graph average of 375 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the Mitsubishi Ki-83's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Pie graph section
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Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
4
4

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


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A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
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