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IAI Nammer (Leopard)

4th Generation Fighter Prototype

IAI Nammer (Leopard)

4th Generation Fighter Prototype

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The failed IAI Nammer was to become the export-minded form of the successful Israeli IAI Kfir line - one prototype was completed before cancellation.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Israel
YEAR: 1991
MANUFACTURER(S): Israel Aircraft Industries (IAI) - Israel
PRODUCTION: 1
OPERATORS: Israel (cancelled)
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the IAI Nammer (Leopard) model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 52.49 feet (16 meters)
WIDTH: 26.97 feet (8.22 meters)
HEIGHT: 14.93 feet (4.55 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 15,873 pounds (7,200 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 36,398 pounds (16,510 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x SNECMA Atar 9K-50 turbojet engine developing 15,870lb thrust with afterburner (11,055lb dry) OR 1 x Volvo Flygmotor RM12 (General Electric F404) turbofan engine developing 18,140lb thrust with afterburner (12,500lb dry).
SPEED (MAX): 1,452 miles-per-hour (2337 kilometers-per-hour; 1,262 knots)
RANGE: 859 miles (1,382 kilometers; 746 nautical miles)
CEILING: 58,071 feet (17,700 meters; 11.00 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 46,500 feet-per-minute (14,173 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



STANDARD:
2 x 30mm DEFA internal cannons

OPTIONAL:
Up to 13,790lb of externally-held stores to include AAMs and ASMs as well as conventional drop stores and rockets.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Nammer - Base Series Name; one example completed.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the IAI Nammer (Leopard) 4th Generation Fighter Prototype.  Entry last updated on 4/18/2016. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The prior success of the potent and effective IAI "Kfir" fighter-bomber platform for the Israeli Air Force led to Israel Aircraft Industries (IAI) investing in an export-minded form of the same design. This endeavor became the abortive "Nammer" product which only saw a sole prototype completed. At its core, it was intended as a modernization, or upgrade, to existing operators of the French Dassault "Mirage 3" and "Mirage 5" lines (the Kfir was itself an evolution of the Mirage 5). Development began during the latter part of the 1980s and continued for a time into the 1990s before the program was scrapped due to a lack of global interest.

Taking the Kfir as the starting point, IAI engineers lengthened the nose cone assembly for a pulse-Doppler multi-mode fire control radar fit and revised the engine compartment to accept two different primary engine types - the French SNECMA Atar 9K-50 turbojet (11,055lb thrust dry / 15,870lb thrust with afterburner) or the Volvo Flygmotor (General Electric) RM12 (F404) turbofan (12,500lb thrust dry / 18,140lb thrust with afterburner). Cockpit features included advanced avionics and Multi-Function Display (MFD) modules as well as a HOTAS (Hands-On-Throttle-and Stock) control scheme. The nose-mounted radar was tied to a modern weapons delivery system for accurate results. The full canard delta wing planform of the Kfir was retained in all its glory as was the single-finned tail section. By all accounts, the Nammer would have exhibited all of the performance and attack capabilities of the Kfir with the flexibility of having the customer choose their equipment fits as needed. Beyond the standard installation of 2 x 30mm DEFA 552 series internal cannons, the aircraft also supported a wide array of guided and unguided munitions including Air-to-Air Missiles (AAMs) and Air-to-Surface Missiles (ASMs) - these across seven hardpoints (five under the fuselage mass). An in-flight refueling quality was to give the Nammer exceptional range over a warzone and some hardpoints were further plumbed for jettisonable fuel tanks.

A prototype Nammer form took its first flight on March 21st, 1991 and worked towards proving the design sound and a viable over-battlefield component. However, to guarantee a Return-On-Investment (RIO), it was decided that at least eighty aircraft would need to be committed to by potential customers. As this never materialized the Nammer was cancelled and fell to the pages of military aviation history despite its potential.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 1500mph
Lo: 750mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (1,452mph).

    Graph average of 1125 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
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  LAX
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  NYC
Graph showcases the IAI Nammer (Leopard)'s operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
1
1

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
Graphical image of an aircrat automatic cannon
Graphical image of aircraft aerial rockets
Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.