Military Factory logo
Icon of a dollar sign
Icon of military officer saluting
Icon of F-15 Eagle military combat fighter aircraft
Icon of Abrams Main Battle Tank
Icon of AK-47 assault rifle
Icon of navy warships

Savoia-Marchetti SM.92

Heavy Fighter Prototype Aircraft

Savoia-Marchetti SM.92

Heavy Fighter Prototype Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Savoia-Marchetti SM.92 was an Italian World War 2 attempt at producing a twin-fuselage heavy fighter.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Kingdom of Italy
YEAR: 1943
MANUFACTURER(S): Savoia-Marchetti - Italy
PRODUCTION: 1
OPERATORS: Kingdom of Italy (cancelled)
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Savoia-Marchetti SM.92 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 2
LENGTH: 44.95 feet (13.7 meters)
WIDTH: 60.86 feet (18.55 meters)
HEIGHT: 13.62 feet (4.15 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 13,007 pounds (5,900 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 19,290 pounds (8,750 kilograms)
ENGINE: 2 x Daimler-Benz DB 605 V12 liquid-cooled supercharged inline piston engines developing 1,290 horsepower each.
SPEED (MAX): 382 miles-per-hour (615 kilometers-per-hour; 332 knots)
RANGE: 1,243 miles (2,000 kilometers; 1,080 nautical miles)
CEILING: 39,370 feet (12,000 meters; 7.46 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 860 feet-per-minute (262 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



PROPOSED:
2 x 20mm MG 151 cannons in central wing section
1 x 20mm MG 151 cannon in starboard fuselage
1 x 12.7mm Breda-SAFAT heavy machine gun under portside engine.
1 x 12.7mm Breda-SAFAT heavy machine gun under starboard side engine.
1 x 12.7mm Breda-SAFAT heavy machine gun (remotely-controlled) in tail installation.

OPTIONAL:
Up to 4,400 pounds of conventional drop stores under central wing unit and 350 pounds under each outboard wing unit.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• SM.92 - Base Series Designation


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Savoia-Marchetti SM.92 Heavy Fighter Prototype Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 5/31/2017. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The conjoining of two airframes to produce an all-new design was a somewhat common occurrence throughout World War 2 (1939-1945) - the Americans and Germans both attempted it through several notable designs. The benefits to such design work was in increased range, firepower and straightline performance though often at the cost of maneuverability, weight and valuable war material. One of the classic examples of this conjoining became the North American F-82 "Twin Mustang" of the United States which mated the bodies of two P-51 fighters along a common central wing mainplane element and tail stabilizer. One of the lesser-known of the conjoined fighter developments of the war became an Italian design - the twin-engine, twin-boom, two-crew Savoia-Marchetti SM.92 - a heavy fighter based on the earlier twin-engine, single-boom, three-crew SM.88 of which only one was built. Like the SM.88, the SM.92 was also only seen in one completed example in 1943 which was destroyed before the end of the war by an Allied air raid.

The SM.92 utilized an asymmetric cockpit arrangement in which the two crew were seated in tandem under a shared canopy within the portside fuselage (as opposed to having two individual cockpits, one in each fuselage as in the F-82). The two crewmen consisted of the pilot and a dedicated rear gunner. Both fuselages included a Daimler-Benz DB 605 series liquid-cooled supercharged inverted V12 engine (1,290 horsepower each) at their front (driving three-bladed propeller assemblies) and vertical rudders at their rear. The two aircraft halves were joined by a common central wing mainplane and a common tail stabilizer plane. The outboard wing mainplanes were symmetrical and held well-forward of midships. The undercarriage was of a "tail-dragger" arrangement with a main leg held under each fuselage section and a single tailwheel fitted under the tail stabilizer unit. Dimensions included a length of 13.7 meters, a wingspan of 18.5 meters and a height of 4.15 meters. Performance from the twin-engine, twin-fuselage arrangement netted a maximum speed of 382 miles per hour, a range out to 1,245 miles and a service ceiling up to 39,360 feet.




Savoia-Marchetti SM.92 (Cont'd)

Heavy Fighter Prototype Aircraft

Savoia-Marchetti SM.92 (Cont'd)

Heavy Fighter Prototype Aircraft



In terms of armament for a heavy fighter, the SM.92 was not to disappoint. 2 x 20mm MG 151 cannons (German) were fitted in the central wing mainplane with a third installed in the starboard side fuselage. A single 12.7mm Breda-SAFAT heavy machine gun was installed under each engine with a third fitted to the tail stabilizer unit facing aft (remotely-controlled to engage any trailing interceptors). Beyond its fixed armament, the SM-92 was slated to carry upwards of 4,400 pounds of conventional drop ordnance under the central wing mainplane and an additional 350 pounds under each outboard wing mainplane.

The SM.92 was devised to fulfill an Italian Air Force requirement for a new twin-seat multirole fighter. The wings, tailplanes and boom of the earlier SM.91 were retained for expediency and a twin fuselage, twin-boom planform was used to harness the power of two engines and doubled internal storage space. It was expected that the aircraft would exhibit the required performance of a fighter with the added punch of something more that a traditional fighter could offer. Construction of a flyable prototype was slow and complicated and a first flight was not recorded until October of 1943. Performance was shown to be slower than expected but over twenty hours of flying were recorded through this one example still (though the design was never properly fully vetted). September of 1943 saw the Italians surrender to the Allies but this left the SM.92 in Axis hands nonetheless. In March of 1944, the prototype was engaged by an Axis pilot who mistook the aircraft for an Allied Lockheed P-38 "Lightning" - an American-made fighter which also used a twin-boom configuration but a single, central nacelle for its cockpit placement. While surviving through desperate maneuvering, the prototype was riddled with enough bullets that damage forced it to be grounded for an extended period of time while repairs were enacted.

After this, the sole prototype was lost when Allied bombs were dropped on its holding area - destroying it completely and ending its attempt at fulfilling the Italian Air Force requirement.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 400mph
Lo: 200mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (382mph).

    Graph average of 300 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the Savoia-Marchetti SM.92's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
1
1

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
Small airplane graphic
Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
Graphical image of an aircraft medium machine gun
Graphical image of an aircraft heavy machine gun
Graphical image of an aircrat automatic cannon
Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.