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Junkers Ju EF 128

Nazi Germany (1945)
Picture of Junkers Ju EF 128 High-Altitude Interceptor

The Junkers EF 128 was another in the long line of late-war German projects intended to satisfy the Emergency Fighter Program requirement.


Detailing the development and operational history of the Junkers Ju EF 128 High-Altitude Interceptor.  Entry last updated on 1/20/2016. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com

The Emergency Fighter Program (EFP) brought about by the German Luftwaffe during the latter stages of World War 2 (1939-1945) was brought about through desperation in countering the threat being posed by the Allied air bombing campaign as well as the arrival of the new Boeing B-29 Superfortress. Early work had already delivered the futuristic-looking Heinkel He 162 "Volksjager" single-seat, single-engine fighter but this design was already becoming obsolete due to the frenetic pace of technology advancements being seen in the war. As such, a successor to this design was sought that fell under the EFP program directive.

Junkers beat out Messerschmitt and others to secure a contract for developing a new high-altitude interceptor. Engineers approached the design with simplicity in mind - one pilot, one engine and wood used through the construction where possible (metals were at a premium by war's end). The resulting design became the EF 128, a stout fighter with high-mounted wings and lacking a tail unit. Instead, small rudders were added to each wing mainplane's trailing edge. The mainplanes were noticeably swept rearwards to promote aerodynamic efficiency at greater speeds. The single seat cockpit was fitted aft of the stub nose cone assembly. The deep fuselage encased vital components such as avionics, fuel, and the engine - the latter which was to be a Heinkel HeS 011 series turbojet. Aspirating the installation was a pair of low-profile intakes set to either side of the fuselage. This allowed space under the cockpit floor to be reserved for up to 4 x 30mm MK 108 autocannons. The undercarriage was a retractable tricycle type arrangement.

Junkers engineers projected their aircraft to reach speeds over 900 kmh - making for one fast interceptor. The tailless design would also have contributed to an agile system.

Junkers submitted their winning design in February of 1945 and work progressed to the point that a wind tunnel model was in use (with data being actively collected and assessed) and a mock-up of the fuselage was underway. Unfortunately for the German war effort (and Junkers workers), the end of the war came in May following Hitler's suicide. This effectively ended all work on the ambitious and intriguing little Junkers EF 128 interceptor product.

By the time of the German surrender, Junkers was also hard at work on a two-seat night-fighter. This version would have seen the fuselage of the original EF 128 extended to make room for the extra crewman.

Any available statistics for the Junkers Ju EF 128 High-Altitude Interceptor are showcased in the areas immediately below. Categories include basic specifications covering country-of-origin, operational status, manufacture(s) and total quantitative production. Other qualities showcased are related to structural values (namely dimensions), installed power and standard day performance figures, installed or proposed armament and mission equipment (if any), global users (from A-to-Z) and series model variants (if any).






Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 750mph
Lo: 375mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (562mph).

    Graph average of 562.5 miles-per-hour.
Aviation Era
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Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
0
0


  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
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Origin: Nazi Germany
Year: 1945
Type: High-Altitude Interceptor
Manufacturer(s): Junkers - Nazi Germany
Production: 0
Global Operators:
Nazi Germany
Historical Commitments / Honors:

Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.
Measurements and Weights icon
Structural - Crew, Dimensions, and Weights:
Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Junkers Ju EF 128 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.

Operational
CREW


Personnel
1


Dimension
LENGTH


Feet
23.13 ft


Meters
7.05 m


Dimension
WIDTH


Feet
29.20 ft


Meters
8.9 m


Dimension
HEIGHT


Feet
8.69 ft


Meters
2.65 m


Weight
EMPTY


Pounds
5,754 lb


Kilograms
2,610 kg


Weight
LOADED


Pounds
8,995 lb


Kilograms
4,080 kg

Engine icon
Installed Power - Standard Day Performance:
1 x Heinkel HeS 011 turbojet engine.

Performance
SPEED


Miles-per-Hour
562 mph


Kilometers-per-Hour
905 kph


Knots
489 kts


Performance
CEILING


Feet
45,112 ft


Meters
13,750 m


Miles
8.54 mi


Performance
CLIMB RATE


Feet-per-Minute
1,375 ft/min


Meters-per-Minute
419 m/min

Supported Weapon Systems:

Graphical image of an aircrat automatic cannon
Armament - Hardpoints (0):

PROPOSED (Standard)
4 x MK 108 cannons under the nose.
Variants: Series Model Variants
• EF 128 - Base Series Designation; only wind tunnel model and a portion of the fuselage completed by war's end.