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Nakajima A6M2-N (Rufe)

Fighter-Bomber / Interceptor Floatplane Aircraft

Nakajima A6M2-N (Rufe)

Fighter-Bomber / Interceptor Floatplane Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Nakajima A6M-2 fighter was a floatplane derivative of the classic Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighter line of World War 2.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Imperial Japan
YEAR: 1942
MANUFACTURER(S): Nakajima Aircraft Company - Imperial Japan
PRODUCTION: 327
OPERATORS: France (single examples, post war); Imperial Japan
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Nakajima A6M2-N (Rufe) model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 33.14 feet (10.1 meters)
WIDTH: 39.37 feet (12 meters)
HEIGHT: 14.11 feet (4.3 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 4,222 pounds (1,915 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 6,349 pounds (2,880 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Nakajima NK1C Sakae 12 air-cooled 14-cylinder radial piston engine developing 950 horsepower.
SPEED (MAX): 270 miles-per-hour (435 kilometers-per-hour; 235 knots)
RANGE: 1,106 miles (1,780 kilometers; 961 nautical miles)
CEILING: 32,808 feet (10,000 meters; 6.21 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 2,525 feet-per-minute (770 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



STANDARD:
2 x 7.7mm Type 97 machine guns in fixed, forward-firing positions along the fuselage.
2 x 20mm Type 99 cannons in wings (one to a wing)

OPTIONAL:
2 x 132 lb conventional drop bombs.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• A6M2-N - Base Series Designation


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Nakajima A6M2-N (Rufe) Fighter-Bomber / Interceptor Floatplane Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 9/3/2015. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
As an island nation with a primary military focus placed on a powerful navy, the Empire of Japan was forced to rely upon a healthy stable of floatplane and flying boat aircraft during its conquest of the Pacific during World War 2 (1939-1945). In 1940, the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) commissioned for a dedicated "fighting floatplane" - a floatplane aircraft capable of operating from water while retaining the abilities and firepower of a modern military fighter. This sort of fighter type was brought about by the need for Japan to field forward-operating elements not relying on fixed airfields or aircraft carriers for their general operation and support. The nation was the only one of the war to put a premium on "fighting floatplanes" as a result.

Kawanishi headed the charge to produce the new fighting floatplane (becoming the N1K "Kyofu" detailed elsewhere on this site) while Nakajima was selected to provide an interim solution which was based on the famous Mitsubishi A6M "Zero" carrier-based fighter platform. The model of choice became the A6M2 and saw its retractable, wheeled undercarriage completely removed. In its place, a triple-float arrangement was added utilizing a large central float section with two underwing floats for additional stability on the water. The float arrangement would remain fixed in flight which added drag and reduced performance some. The cockpit seated one under a greenhouse-style canopy with generally adequate views around the airframe. The original A6M armament of 2 x 20mm cannons and 2 x 7.7mm machine guns was retained which had already proven sufficient against enemy aircraft over Asia and the Pacific in the early campaigns of the war. While IJN forces were busy enacting their surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on December 7th, 1941, the new fighting floatplane recorded its first flight in prototype form. It was subsequently adopted into IJN service as the "A6M2-N" and eventually given the Allied codename of "Rufe".

Entering service in 1942, the A6M2-N was pressed into immediate action in several of the mid-war campaigns including the Aleutians and the Solomon Islands Campaign. The A6M2-N inventory suffered a severe setback when, on August 7th, 1942, a seaplane base was destroyed by Allied fighter-bombers, taking with it most of the available A6M2-Ns stationed there. Nevertheless, total production was able to net 327 aircraft and these were used with good efficiency against Allied positions - marking patrol elements, aiding warship guns, engaging convoys, and reconnoitering areas over-the-horizon. However, when Allied fighter coverage became more numerous and effective, the value of the A6M2-N dwindled and losses began to naturally mount. For the final months of the war, the series was used in defense of the Japanese homeland as an interceptor where the aircraft's capabilities were severely hampered against high-flying Allied bombers and faster, better performing enemy fighters.

In the post-war period, the French managed to capture a single example in Indochina though this aircraft was quickly lost in a crash marking the only foreign use of the type - however brief it was.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 300mph
Lo: 150mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (270mph).

    Graph average of 225 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
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  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the Nakajima A6M2-N (Rufe)'s operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Pie graph section
Pie graph section
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Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
327
327

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
Graphical image of an aircraft medium machine gun
Graphical image of an aircrat automatic cannon
Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
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