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OKB-1 EF-140

Jet-Powered Tactical Fast Reconnaissance / Bomber Prototype

OKB-1 EF-140

Jet-Powered Tactical Fast Reconnaissance / Bomber Prototype

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Soviet OKB-1 EF-140 jet-powered bomber prototype emerged from work immediately done after the close of World War 2.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Soviet Union
YEAR: 1948
MANUFACTURER(S): GOZ-1 - Soviet Union
PRODUCTION: 2
OPERATORS: Soviet Union (cancelled)
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the OKB-1 EF-140 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 4
LENGTH: 63.16 feet (19.25 meters)
WIDTH: 71.75 feet (21.87 meters)
HEIGHT: 18.54 feet (5.65 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 32,353 pounds (14,675 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 56,317 pounds (25,545 kilograms)
ENGINE: 2 x Klimov VK-1 turbojet engines developing 5,950 lb of thrust each.
SPEED (MAX): 522 miles-per-hour (840 kilometers-per-hour; 454 knots
RANGE: 2,237 miles (3,600 kilometers; 1,944 nautical miles)
CEILING: 46,260 feet (14,100 meters; 8.76 miles)




ARMAMENT



STANDARD:
2 x 23mm cannons in dorsal turret
2 x 23mm cannons in ventral turret

OPTIONAL:
Up to 8 x 220lb bombs carried.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• 140 - Base Series Designation; fitted with 2 x Mikulin AM-TKRD-01 turbojet engines.
• 140-R - Reconnaissance conversion of the 140; fitted with Klimov VK-1 series turbojet engines.
• 140-B/R - Second prototype; reconnaissance-bomber form.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the OKB-1 EF-140 Jet-Powered Tactical Fast Reconnaissance / Bomber Prototype.  Entry last updated on 4/5/2016. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The EF-140 was a Soviet post-World War 2 jet-powered tactical bomber design continuation of the line begun with the capture of the German Junkers Ju 287. The Ju 287 was one of the more unique of the German wartime jet-powered aircraft in development before the close of the war in 1945 - particularly in its use of advanced swept-forward wings as well as jet propulsion technology. The Junkers product was furthered into the local Soviet "EF-131" which completed a hasty first flight in 1946 with more formal testing had in 1947. Though the project was terminated in 1948, the second airframe of the EF-131 made up the basis for the evolved EF-140.

The EF-140 initially existed as a tactical bomber like the EF-131 before it. However, whereas the EF-131 relied on now-obsolete German Junkers Jumo turbojets (a total of six such systems powered the original aircraft), the EF-140 introduced Soviet engines of a more advanced, capable nature. Design of the new aircraft commenced in 1947 and the EF-131 was modified to carry 2 x Mikulin AM-TKRD-01 axial flow turbojet engines. The forward-swept wings remained in play with the engines slung underneath and the crew of three was increased to four. Dimensions included a length of 62 feet, a wingspan of 71.8 feet and a height of 18.5 feet. Fixed armament became four guns (largely defensive in nature) with two guns held in a dorsal barbette and two guns fitted to a ventral barbette. Both barbettes would be remote-controlled and aimed by way of periscopes. An internal bomb bay would hold several thousand pounds of conventional drop ordnance.

The initial EF-140, born from the second EF-131 prototype while carrying the Mikulin engines, was made ready for September 1948 and completed its first flight on September 30th. From this, thought came to rework the EF-140 as a tactical fast-reconnaissance platform and this produced the "EF-140R" model in turn. Engines were changed to 2 x Klimov VK-1 units (5,950lb thrust each) and wingtip fuel tanks were added to increase operational ranges. Other refinements were enacted on the overall design including revised turrets.

Flight testing at GOZ-1 revealed issues with wing flutter which brought the design back to the engineering boards. The final iteration of the line came in the proposed "EF-140B/R" which was to be a fast-reconnaissance platform with bombing capability as secondary. The engines remained the same Klimov units as in the earlier model and the program progressed enough to begin ground testing before the end. However development was terminated on both prototypes in June of 1950 in favor of more advanced, capable bomber / reconnaissance platforms.




MEDIA





Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

Image of collection of graph types

Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 750mph
Lo: 375mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (522mph).

    Graph average of 562.5 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
LAX
 
  NYC
Graph showcases the OKB-1 EF-140R's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
2
2

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue