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Ghods Mohajer / Mersad (Migrant)

Iran (1981)
National Flag Graphic
Origin: Iran
Year: 1981
Type: Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) / Reconnaissance Drone
Manufacturer(s): Ghods Aviation Industries - Iran
Production: 400


The Ghods Mohajer drone was one of the first successful UAV endeavors undertaken by the nation of Iran.


Detailing the development and operational history of the Ghods Mohajer / Mersad (Migrant) Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) / Reconnaissance Drone.  Entry last updated on 7/26/2017. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com

Iranian engineers have been hard at work in building up local Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) stocks for the military. This has included regular Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance (ISR) types as well as armed, munitions-delivery Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicle (UCAV) platforms. The Ghods "Mohajer" (also spelled as "Mahajer") represents one of the former as it primarily serves as an intelligence-collecting system. It has been taken on by the forces of Iran, Sudan, Syria, Venezuela (the Mohajer-2 locally-produced as the SANZT "Arpia") as well as Hezbollah forces. Four major variants mark its production and service run to date with subvariants being developed as well.

The need for an ISR system came about during the bloody Iran-Iraq conflict of the 1980s which pushed Iranian industry to develop a local solution for its Army. This resulted in a collection of prototypes emerging in the early part of the decade to which operational forms were then used in actual war zones between the two neighboring countries. The original series was named "Mohajer-1" and began the line of Mohajer UAVs still in service today (2016). Beyond its use as a ISR platform, it is said that some models operated in the conflict were, in fact, armed with rockets for assailing ground targets - in essence evolving the Mohajer into a UCAV with broader tactical usefulness.
From this work came a more advanced form offering greater operational range and improved navigation. The model was designated as "Mohajer-2" and took over production for use in the Iranian Army. As built, the Mohajer-2 was given a length of 9.6 feet and a wingspan of 12.5 feet. Its propulsion system consisted of a WAE-342 series 2-stroke engine delivering 25 horsepower while driving a two-bladed propeller in a "pusher" configuration (the propeller seated at the rear of the airframe). The fuselage was largely tubular in its general shape with straight wing mainplanes seated near midships (displaying clipped wing tips as well). Twin booms made up the empennage and a joining horizontal plane was featured between each vertical tail unit. Optics were fitted to a rotating blister assembly seen under the nose of the aircraft. Performance included a maximum speed of over 100 miles per hour, a range out to 90 miles and a service ceiling up to 11,000 feet. Endurance is about six hours of flight time.

Additional advancements to the line inevitably produced the "Mohajer-3" which further increased range and over-battlefield capabilities. Still further work begat an even more advanced version - this becoming the "Mohajer-4" - which, itself, has gone on to produce a pair of subvariants all its own. While retaining the general form and function of the Mohajer-2 line, the Mohajer-4 sports a boxier fuselage and three-legged undercarriage. The wing mainplanes also showcase wingtips cranked upwards.

The Mojaher series adds quite a bit to Iranian (and allied) actions in a region consistently beset by war and tribal/political struggles. Its evolution continues today (2016) and evermore improved versions are being worked on and tested. The line has certainly gone a long way in helping to propel local aero-industry to produce a self-sustained Iranian UAV industry. The series is also known under the "Mersad" ("Migrant") name.






Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 120mph
Lo: 60mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (103mph).

    Graph average of 90 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
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  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
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  MOS
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  TOK
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  SYD
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  LAX
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  NYC
Graph showcases the Ghods Mohajer / Mersad (Migrant)'s operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
400
400


  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


  Compare this entry against other aircraft using our Comparison Tool  
Global Operators:
Hezbollah; Iran; Sudan; Syria; Venezuela
Historical Commitments / Honors:

Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.
Measurements and Weights icon
Structural - Crew, Dimensions, and Weights:
Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Ghods Mohajer / Mersad (Migrant) model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.

Operational
CREW


Personnel
0


Dimension
LENGTH


Feet
10.24 ft


Meters
3.12 m


Dimension
WIDTH


Feet
17.39 ft


Meters
5.3 m


Weight
EMPTY


Pounds
187 lb


Kilograms
85 kg


Weight
LOADED


Pounds
386 lb


Kilograms
175 kg

Engine icon
Installed Power - Standard Day Performance:
Variable depending on model; Mohajer-4: 1 x WAE342/3w series engine driving two-blade propeller in pusher configuration.

Performance
SPEED


Miles-per-Hour
103 mph


Kilometers-per-Hour
165 kph


Knots
89 kts


Performance
RANGE


Miles
62 mi


Kilometers
100 km


Nautical Miles
54 nm

Supported Weapon Systems:

Armament - Hardpoints (0):

Typically none as payload reserved for reconnaissance equipment. Some versions believed to have been armed with rocket grenades.
Variants: Series Model Variants
• Mohajer - Base Series Name
• Mohajer-1 - Initial model of 1981
• Mohajer-2 - Improved variant; increased range; autopilot function.
• Mohajer-2N ("Novin") - Improved, modernized variant; improved range; expanded optics suite; model of 2014.
• Mohajer-3 - Revised, slab-sided fuselage; increased range.
• Mohajer-4 - Revised fuselage and wings; increased range and flying altitude.
• Mohajer-4(B) - Photogrammetric variant with aerial mapping capabilities.
• Mohajer-4 "Hodhod A/100" - Variant
• Mohajer-4 "Shahin" - Variant
• SANT "Arpia" - Venezuelan variant believed based on the Iranian Mohajer-2 model.