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LFG Roland D.VI

Biplane Fighter Aircraft

LFG Roland D.VI

Biplane Fighter Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The LFG Roland D.VI biplane fighter series arrived in small numbers by the end of World War 1 - making a minimal impact on the air war.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Imperial Germany
YEAR: 1918
MANUFACTURER(S): Luft-Fahrzeug-Gesellschaft GmbH (LFG Roland) - Imperial Germany
PRODUCTION: 350
OPERATORS: Imperial Germany
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the LFG Roland D.VI model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 20.73 feet (6.32 meters)
WIDTH: 30.91 feet (9.42 meters)
HEIGHT: 9.19 feet (2.8 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 1,444 pounds (655 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 1,863 pounds (845 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Benz Bz.IIIa engine of 200 horsepower.
SPEED (MAX): 124 miles-per-hour (200 kilometers-per-hour; 108 knots)
RANGE: 249 miles (400 kilometers; 216 nautical miles)
CEILING: 19,029 feet (5,800 meters; 3.60 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 860 feet-per-minute (262 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



2 x 7.92mm LMG 08/15 machine guns in fixed, forward-firing positions along the fuselage.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• D.VI - Base Series Designation
• D.VIb - Production model


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the LFG Roland D.VI Biplane Fighter Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 10/27/2016. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
The LFG Roland D.VI was adopted by the German Air Service of World War 1 (1914-1918) as a successor to the outgoing Albatros D.Va and Pfalz D.IIIa series biplane fighters. It originally failed to overcome the competing Fokker D.VII in a fly-off competition but was nonetheless ordered for serial production pending the outcome of the D.VII's development and production phases. The D.VI existed in 350 total aircraft and was introduced during the final year of the war.

As completed, the D.VI became an all-new biplane fighter attempt that broke away from the accepted norms witnessed in earlier Roland aircraft attempts. A "klinker-built" - or "lapstrake" - construction method was employed which used thin overlapping strips of wood over a wooden understructure producing a "planking" effect - similar to that as used in boats. This method was first witnessed on the earlier, ultimately abandoned LFG Roland Dr. IV triplane fighter prototype and now continued with the new D.VI effort.

The D.VI entered its flight test phase during November of 1917 as the war raged on. This form was outfitted with the Mercedes D.III series engine of 160 horsepower and three total prototypes were eventually completed for the D.VI test program. Due to limitations in the availability of the D.III engine, the Benz Bz IIIa of 150 horsepower was also tested and this phase took the aircraft into January of 1918.

That same month, the D.VI fell to the Fokker D.VII in a fly-off but was ordered into serial production as a failsafe to the Fokker design. In February an order for fifty of the LFG Roland aircraft was placed which would include Mercedes-engined versions as the "D.VIa" and Benz-engined versions as the "D.VIb". Deliveries occurred from May into June and strength reached seventy before the final months of the war - 58 were of the D.VIa type and 12 of the D.VIb model.

In practice, the new biplane performed admirably well for its role as fighter. It was modestly armed through 2 x 7.92mm LMG 08/15 machine guns synchronized to fire through the spinning propeller blades and its straightline performance was good with agility being a noted quality. The aircraft lacked an improved rate-of-climb when compared to the aircraft it was to succeed and the end of the war limited its reach in both terms of operational service and production numbers - total manufacture netted 150 D.VIa and 200 D.VIb aircraft before the end.

Performance specifications included a maximum speed of 125 miles per hour, a service ceiling of 19,000 feet and a rate-of-climb near 865 feet per minute. The aircraft found varying levels of service within the inventory of the German Air Service and the German Navy.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 150mph
Lo: 75mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (124mph).

    Graph average of 112.5 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
PAR
 
  BER
BER
 
  MSK
MSK
 
  TKY
TKY
 
  SYD
SYD
 
  LAX
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  NYC
Graph showcases the LFG Roland D.VI's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Pie graph section
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Pie graph section
Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
350
350

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Altitude Visualization
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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue