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Yakovlev Yak-52

Primary Trainer / Light Ground Attack Aircraft

Yakovlev Yak-52

Primary Trainer / Light Ground Attack Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The Yakovlev Yak-52 basic two-seat trainer was developed from the preceding Yak-50 series of one-seat airframes.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Soviet Union
YEAR: 1979
STATUS: Active, In-Service
MANUFACTURER(S): Yakovlev - Soviet Union / Russia; AeroStar - Romania
PRODUCTION: 1,800
OPERATORS: Armenia; Belarus; Bulgaria; Georgia; Hungary; Latvia; Lithuania; Romania; Russia; Soviet Union; Turkmenistan; Vietnam
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Yakovlev Yak-52 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 2
LENGTH: 25.39 feet (7.74 meters)
WIDTH: 30.51 feet (9.3 meters)
HEIGHT: 8.86 feet (2.7 meters)
WEIGHT (EMPTY): 2,238 pounds (1,015 kilograms)
WEIGHT (MTOW): 2,877 pounds (1,305 kilograms)
ENGINE: 1 x Vedeneyev M-14P 9-cylinder radial piston engine developing 360 horsepower.
SPEED (MAX): 177 miles-per-hour (285 kilometers-per-hour; 154 knots)
RANGE: 342 miles (550 kilometers; 297 nautical miles)
CEILING: 13,123 feet (4,000 meters; 2.49 miles)
RATE-OF-CLIMB: 1,380 feet-per-minute (421 meters-per-minute)




ARMAMENT



Usually none. Ground attack variant can sport 2 x 32-shot UB-32-57 rocket pods.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Yak-52 - Base Series Designation
• Yak-52M - Modernized model of 2003
• Iak-52 - Romanian designation of Yak-52 system
• Iak-52W - Westernized version; M-14P or M-14Kh engines; western-style instrument panel.
• Iak-52TW - Westernized version; M-14P or M-14Kh engines; tail wheel unit replaces nose wheel; new wings; fully retractable main legs; increased internal fuel tanks.
• AeroStar "Condor" - Westernized version with Lycoming O-540 engine.


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Yakovlev Yak-52 Primary Trainer / Light Ground Attack Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 8/18/2018. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
In the latter stages of the Cold War (1947-1991), the Soviet Air Force relied on the Yakovlev Yak-52 to fulfill the primary trainer role. This all-metal aircraft followed conventional design wisdom as primary trainers went, seating its crew of two in tandem (under a framed canopy), showcasing straight monoplane wings, and driven by a propeller at the nose. After the fall of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, the Yak-52's value to the new Russian Air Force dwindled and stocks of the aircraft witnessed export to former Soviet allies and private buyers. About 1,800 were produced by the Soviets with some license production having been had in Romania (Aerostar). A first-flight was recorded in 1976 and service entry occurred in 1979.

The Yak-52 had origins in the earlier Yak-50 product of 1975. These trainer / aerobatic aircraft appeared in 314 examples of their own and were themselves offspring of the Yak-18 line introduced in 1946. At any rate, all three of the designs shared many similarities in both form and function - they were easy to fly and relatively inexpensive to procure and maintain in the long term - true Soviet design staples. The Yak-52 was designed as a military trainer from the outset which meant greater tolerances had to be adhered to. The benefit was that, when coupled with a lightweight frame, the aircraft could also serve quite well as an aerobatics platform and racer.

Initial production yielded the basic "Yak-52" mark and these carried a Vedeneyev M-14P series 9-cylinder radial air-cooled radial piston engines of 360 horsepower driving a two-bladed propeller unit at the nose. A ground-attack model was formed from this framework as the "Yak-52B" and these could be armed through 2 x UB-32-57 series rocket pods (32 rockets each) for ground target saturation. The Yak-52 series was then modernized with the introduction of the "Yak-52M" and this form shifted the family line to using the Vedeneyev M-14Kh radial piston engine now driving a three-bladed propeller unit. In addition to this, the M-models were given upgraded avionics.

Romania went on to produce the product (legally, under license) under its Aerostar brand label and these aircraft are designated "Iak-52". A "westernized" version of the product emerged known under the name of "Condor" and it was powered by an American Lycoming O-540 series engine. The "Iak-52W", another western-minded variant, is powered by either the M-14P or M-14Kh engine and its cockpit sports western-style gauges. The "Iak-52TW" follows suit though with newer wings and extra internal fuel. It also has a tailwheel as opposed to a nosewheel.

Operators of the Yak-52 have included Armenia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Georgia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Russia (Soviet Union), Ukraine, Turkmenistan and Vietnam. Some of these powers still actively field the type.

As built, the Yak-52 was given a length of 25.4 feet, a wingspan of 30.6 feet and a height of 8.10 feet. Empty weight was 2,240lb against an MTOW of 2,900lb. The M-14P engine provided a maximum speed of 177 mph, a cruise speed of 118 mph and a range out to 340 miles. The aircraft's service ceiling neared 13,125 feet and rate-of-climb was 1,380 feet-per-minute.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 200mph
Lo: 100mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (177mph).

    Graph average of 150 miles-per-hour.
City-to-City Ranges
NYC
 
  LDN
LDN
 
  PAR
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  BER
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  MSK
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  TKY
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  SYD
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  LAX
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  NYC
Graph showcases the Yakovlev Yak-52's operational range (on internal fuel) when compared to distances between major cities.
Aviation Era
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Useful in showcasing the era cross-over of particular aircraft/aerospace designs.
Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
1800
1800

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


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Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
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