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Zeppelin Z.12 (LZ-26)

Type N-class Airship

Zeppelin Z.12 (LZ-26)

Type N-class Airship

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



LZ-26 became one of the more successful of the World War 1 German airships with some 44,000lbs of ordnance dropped.
National Flag Graphic
ORIGIN: Imperial Germany
YEAR: 1914
MANUFACTURER(S): German Empire
PRODUCTION: 1
OPERATORS: Imperial Germany
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Zeppelin Z.12 (LZ-26) model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 18
ENGINE: Multiple engines in pusher configuration.




ARMAMENT



STANDARD:
Multiple machine guns in trainable mountings.

OPTIONAL:
Up to 2,720lb of conventional drop ordnance.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• Z.XII - Tactical Designation
• LZ-26 - Production Number


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Zeppelin Z.12 (LZ-26) Type N-class Airship.  Entry last updated on 12/8/2016. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
First flown on December 14th, 1914, the military-minded Zeppelin "LZ-26" became one of the more successful of the German Empire Zeppelins of World War 1. it was used as a reconnaissance and bombing platform over the Eastern Front against the Russian Empire and against the Allies on the Western Front, particularly over Northern France. The airship served under the tactical designation of Z XII and was born from the "Type N" class. As a bombing platform, it claimed some 44,100lbs of ordnance dropped in the war across eleven total missions. Despite these successes, the age of the Zeppelin as a useful frontline bombing platform was more or less over - it was formally decommissioned on August 8th, 1917.

LZ-26 took on the established shape of Zeppelins with tapered ends - the frontal section a nose cone and the aft section finned for stability control. These ends capped a tubular body consisting of a metal skeletal structure covered over in fabric. Lifting was accomplished through use of hydrogen-filled cells with the skin of the airship - hydrogen proving useful for the role though highly flammable in turn. When the Allies began wider spread use of incendiary ammunition, this became a very real and lethal problem for German airship crews. The crews were housed in under-slung gondolas containing armament stores and defensive weaponry while engines (providing the necessary forward propulsion) were held out and away from the fuselage by way of struts. Despite their climbing ability and valuable "over-the-horizon" qualities from a tactical sense, the more advanced Allied aircraft and improved ground-based anti-aircraft fire began to severely marginalized airships as useful battlefield weapons.

The airship concept was pioneered by German Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin (hence its popular common name of "Zeppelin"). The concept first emerged in useful form as early as 1874 before being finalized in 1893 while a German patent proved forthcoming in 1895. First commercial use of Zeppelins in the airliner role began in 1910 - roughly four years before the war.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
1
1

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
Graphical image of an aircraft medium machine gun
Graphical image of an aircraft conventional drop bomb munition
Commitments / Honors
Military lapel ribbon for Operation Allied Force
Military lapel ribbon for the Arab-Israeli War
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Britain
Military lapel ribbon for the Battle of Midway
Military lapel ribbon for the Berlin Airlift
Military lapel ribbon for the Chaco War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cold War
Military lapel ribbon for the Cuban Missile Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for pioneering aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the Falklands War
Military lapel ribbon for the French-Indochina War
Military lapel ribbon for the Golden Age of Flight
Military lapel ribbon for the 1991 Gulf War
Military lapel ribbon for the Indo-Pak Wars
Military lapel ribbon for the Iran-Iraq War
Military lapel ribbon for the Korean War
Military lapel ribbon for the 1982 Lebanon War
Military lapel ribbon for the Malayan Emergency
Military lapel ribbon representing modern aircraft
Military lapel ribbon for the attack on Pearl Harbor
Military lapel ribbon for the Six Day War
Military lapel ribbon for the Soviet-Afghan War
Military lapel ribbon for the Spanish Civil War
Military lapel ribbon for the Suez Crisis
Military lapel ribbon for the Vietnam War
Military lapel ribbon for Warsaw Pact of the Cold War-era
Military lapel ribbon for the WASP (WW2)
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 1
Military lapel ribbon for the World War 2
Military lapel ribbon for the Yom Kippur War
Military lapel ribbon for experimental x-plane aircraft
* Ribbons not necessarily indicative of actual historical campaign ribbons. Ribbons are clickable to their respective campaigns/operations.