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Blohm and Voss Bv P.208

Concept Fighter Aircraft

Blohm and Voss Bv P.208

Concept Fighter Aircraft

OVERVIEW
SPECIFICATIONS
ARMAMENT
VARIANTS
HISTORY
MEDIA
OVERVIEW



The unorthodox - and ultimately abandoned - Blohm and Voss P.208 fighter project influenced the upcoming P.212 jet fighter submission.
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ORIGIN: Nazi Germany
YEAR: 1945
MANUFACTURER(S): Blohm and Voss - Nazi Germany
PRODUCTION: 0
OPERATORS: Nazi Germany
SPECIFICATIONS



Unless otherwise noted the presented statistics below pertain to the Blohm and Voss Bv P.208 model. Common measurements, and their respective conversions, are shown when possible.
CREW: 1
LENGTH: 30.18 feet (9.2 meters)
WIDTH: 39.63 feet (12.08 meters)
ENGINE: (01): 1 x Junkers Jumo 222E/F/N inline engine; (02): 1 x Argus As 413 engine developing 4,000 horsepower; (03): 1 x Daimler-Benz DB 603L/N V12 inline engine.
SPEED (MAX): 491 miles-per-hour (790 kilometers-per-hour; 427 knots)




ARMAMENT



PROPOSED:
3 x 30mm MK 108 cannons in nose.
VARIANTS



Series Model Variants
• P.208 - Base Series Designation


HISTORY



Detailing the development and operational history of the Blohm and Voss Bv P.208 Concept Fighter Aircraft.  Entry last updated on 12/29/2016. Authored by Staff Writer. Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com.
Blohm and Voss, the famous German shipbuilder of World War 2 was also responsible for several of the well-known and easily recognized flying boats of the German Navy. To this was also added hundreds of "paper" airplane designs of which only a select few were ever formally adopted. The others were highly unorthodox designs that, had they flown, would have brought about revolutionary changes in aviation design. One such design became the P.208, a single-seat, single-engined fighter concept utilizing a tailless design, tricycle undercarriage and sweptback wing assemblies.

Heading into 1944, Germany was losing initiatives (and territories) across all fighting fronts. This pushed the development of new fighter concepts and, along with it, turbojet and rocket-powered interceptors. The greatest emerging threat to the German war machine was the Allied bombing campaign which sought to wreck all war-making capabilities for Hitler's Nazi kingdom. However, early turbojets proved temperamental, sometimes a danger and producing underwhelming results in some circles. Blohm and Voss took to designing an all-new fighter type to initially utilize a conventional piston engine with the prospect the airframe could be modified to accept a turbojet installation at a future time. Thus begat the P.208 project which never advanced beyond the paper stage. Its design resurfaced in the more refined P.212 project detailed elsewhere on this site - though utilizing a turbojet installation from the outset.

As conceived, the P.208 was given a compact, tubular fuselage tapered at both ends for aerodynamic efficiency. All fuel, avionics and armament was contained in this centralized nacelle with the cockpit fitted just ahead of midships. Armament was seated in the nose with the engine in a compartment at the rear. This forced the three-bladed propeller to push air in a "pusher" configuration. Wings were low-mounted assemblies with noticeable sweep of 30-degrees. The tips showcased an upward and downward crank while lacking any vertical surfaces providing the necessary rudder/elevator controls. The undercarriage was of a tricycle arrangement with single-wheeled main legs (retracting into the wings) and a single-wheeled nose leg. As the P.208 lacked vertical surfaces, a formal tail assembly, made use of sweptback wings and a pusher propeller arrangement, it proved one of the more unique aircraft offerings of the war. Proposed armament was 3 x 30mm MK 108 cannons, all contained in the nose. Dimensions included a wingspan of 40 feet and a running length of 30 feet.

Power was to have been served through a Daimler-Benz 12-cylinder DB 603L two-stage supercharger inline piston engine of 2,100 horsepower output. MW50 methanol-water injection would have provided additional boost at altitude. Blohm and Voss engineers estimated a maximum speed of 490 miles per hour for the P.208 design.

The P.208 originally emerged through the P.208.01 initiative which was to be fitted with the troublesome Junkers Jumo 222 series inline piston engine - the same as powering the Ju 288 and Fw 191 bomber developments (only 289 Jumo 222 engines were ever built). 2 x Junkers Jumop 213 engines (making up the Argus As 413) were to power the follow up P.208.02. The P.208.03 existed in three proposed subvariants through P.208.03.01, P.208.03.02 and P.208.03.03. The major difference between the types was the Diamler-Benz DB 603L selected for the 01 and 02 marks and the 603N engine to be used in the 03 mark.

The P.208 never materialized into a sufficient fighter concept with no prototypes having been built before the end of the war in May of 1945. A Skoda-Kauba V-6 was modified as the SL-6 to verify much of the P.208 design.




MEDIA









Our Data Modules allow for quick visual reference when comparing a single entry against contemporary designs. Areas covered include general ratings, speed assessments, and relative ranges based on distances between major cities.

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Relative Maximum Speed Rating
Hi: 500mph
Lo: 250mph
    This entry's maximum listed speed (491mph).

    Graph average of 375 miles-per-hour.
Aviation Era
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Unit Production Comparison
Comm. Market HI*: 44,000 units
Military Market HI**: 36,183 units
0
0

  * Commercial Market High belongs to Cessna 172.

  ** Military Market High belongs to Ilyushin Il-2.


Supported Roles
A2A
Interception
UAV
Ground Attack
CAS
Training
ASW
Anti-Ship
AEW
MEDEVAC
EW
Maritime/Navy
SAR
Aerial Tanker
Utility/Transport
VIP
Passenger
Business
Recon
SPECOPS
X-Plane/Development
A2A=Air-to-Air; UAV=Unmanned; CAS=Close Support; ASW=Anti-Submarine; AEW=Airborne Early Warning; MEDEVAC=Medical Evac; EW=Electronic Warfare; SAR=Search-Rescue
Supported Arsenal
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Commitments / Honors
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