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Stinson Reliant


Lightweight Liaison Aircraft


Aviation / Aerospace

The high-wing monplane Stinson Reliant series soldiered on before, through and after World War 2 in service with several notable operators.



Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 4/15/2020 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com
The Stinson Reliant was a product of the pre-World War 2 (1939-1945) period and used in the liaison and training roles. It carried a shoulder-mounted monoplane form giving it excellent lift, low-altitude handling, and short-field capabilities. 1,327 of the type were produced in a myriad of variants and these went on to serve a large collection of global operators ranging from Argentina and Australia to Paraguay and the United States.

The Stinson Aircraft Company was founded after the fighting of World War 1 (1914-1918) in 1920 and managed an existence until after World War 2 in 1948. Based out of Detroit, Michigan, the company excelled at the lightweight plane concept with many of its creations seen sporting shoulder-mounted wing mainplanes. The company's first major contribution was the SB-1 "Detroiter" - a single-engine cabin biplane - of which twenty-six examples were from 1926 on (ultimately more than 100 aircraft were built under the Detroiter name).

Production of the Reliant occurred in the pre-war years beginning in 1931 and ended when the war was in full swing in 1943. While many early types were conditioned for civilian use, the first dedicated military forms were finally introduced in February of 1942 when the United States war machine required aircraft of all types for the effort. Both the British and the Americans relied on the lightweight aircraft to survey battlefields, conduct reconnaissance runs, communications, and ferrying passengers to and fro. For the latter party, the aircraft was designated as UC-81 and AT-19 marking utility and trainer roles, respectively. Several aircraft mimicking the form and function of the Reliant were utilized by the United States and other military powers of the wartime period.

Variants of the Reliant proved plenty and, therefore, the aircraft could be pressed into a variety of roles including general cargo hauling, air ambulance, photographic scouting, firefighting, and target towing. The civilian market line began with the SR Reliant and this form carried the Lycoming R-680 radial piston engine of 215 horsepower. This was followed by the SR-1 with its Lycoming R-680-2 engine of 240 horsepower - two were built. From this beginning arrived other marks ranging from SR-3 to the SR-10K, the latter powered through a Wright R-760E-3 engine - eleven of this mark were produced in all.

The SR-10F production form carried a crew of one and up to four passengers. Dimensions included a running length of 27.10 feet, a wingspan of 41.6 feet, and a height of 8.5 feet. Empty weight was 3,045lb against a Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) of 4,605lb. Power was from a single Pratt & Whitney "Wasp Junior" SB 9-cylinder, air-cooled radial piston engine developing 400 horsepower and driving a two-bladed propeller unit at the nose. With this configuration, the aircraft could manage a cruising speed near 177 miles-per-hour, a range out to 850 miles, and a service ceiling up to 21,000 feet. Rate-of-climb was 1,330 feet-per-minute.

Military marks began with the AT-19 designated by the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) and operated by the British Royal Navy through Lend-Lease as the "Reliant I" - 500 examples being produced. Fifty-one AT-19s were converted for the photographic surveying role as the AT-19C. Utility marks began with the UC-81 and ran, in order, to the UC-81N. The L-12 were a pair of SR.5A models taken into USAAF service while the L-12A were a pair of SR-7Bs. RQ-1 was used to designated a one-off SR-5 model taken on by the United States Coast Guard service in 1935 - this example was eventually redesignated as the XR3Q-1 and operated into 1941 by the United States Navy.


Specifications



Year:
1933
Status
Retired, Out-of-Service
Crew
1
[ 1,327 Units ] :
Stinson Aircraft Company - USA
National flag of Argentina National flag of Australia National flag of Brazil National flag of El Salvador National flag of Mexico National flag of Norway National flag of Paraguay National flag of Philippines National flag of United Kingdom National flag of United States Argentina; Australia; Brazil; El Salvador; Mexico; Norway; Paraguay; Philippines; United Kingdom; United States
- Reconnaissance (RECCE)
- Training
Length:
27.92 ft (8.51 m)
Width:
41.60 ft (12.68 m)
Height:
8.53 ft (2.6 m)
(Showcased structural dimension values pertain to the Stinson Reliant SR-10F production model)
Empty Weight:
3,053 lb (1,385 kg)
MTOW:
4,630 lb (2,100 kg)
(Diff: +1,576lb)
(Showcased weight values pertain to the Stinson Reliant SR-10F production model)
1 x Pratt & Whitney "Wasp Junior" SB 9-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine driving a two-bladed propeller unit at the nose.
(Showcased powerplant information pertains to the Stinson Reliant SR-10F production model)
Max Speed:
177 mph (285 kph; 154 kts)
Service Ceiling:
20,997 feet (6,400 m; 3.98 miles)
Max Range:
851 miles (1,370 km; 740 nm)
Rate-of-Climb:
1,330 ft/min (405 m/min)
(Showcased performance values pertain to the Stinson Reliant SR-10F production model; Compare this aircraft entry against any other in our database)
None.
(Showcased armament details pertain to the Stinson Reliant SR-10F production model)
SR-1
SR-2
SR-3
SR-4
SR-5
SR-5A
SR-5B
SR-5C
SR-5E
SR-5F
SR-6
SR-6A
SR-6B
SR-7
SR-7B
SR-7C
SR-8A
SR-8B
SR-8C
SR-8D
SR-8DM
SR-8E
SR-8DE
SR-9
SR-9A
SR-9B
SR-9C
SR-9E
SR-9F
SR-10 - Final commercial model
SR-10B
SR-10C
SR-10D
SR-10E
SR-10F
SR-10G
SR-10J
SR-10K
AT-19
AT-19A
AR-19B
AT-19C
UC-81
UC-81A
UC-81C
UC-81D
XC-81D
UC-81E
UC-81F
UC-81G
UC-81H
UC-81J
UC-81K
UC-81L
UC-81M
UC-81N
L-12
L-12A
RQ-1
XR3Q-1
Reliant Mk I
V-77 - Post-war civilian model marketed by Vultee.
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