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Military Factory

WW2 Guns and Other Small Arms

Last Updated: 5/26/2015

Despite technological advances since the close of World War 1, World War 2 made use of weapons from the past while incorporating all-new designs.


When World War 2 exploded into total war during September of 1939, any an all manner of small arms were poured into the conflict. This meant that turn-of-the-century firearms fought alongside more modern implements and all-new designs ultimately rounded out available options for all sides. Bolt-action rifles, self-loading rifles, the machine gun, hand grenade and other weapons permeated World War 2 battlefields in an attempt to stave off elimination for all sides. Ultimately, Allied forces defeated the Axis powers by the latter half of 1945 and there proved some semblance of peace in the world - soon to be disrupted by the many battles for independence dotting the globe as well as events occurring on the Korean Peninsula.


There are a total of (238) World War 2 Guns in the Military Factory. Entries are listed below by alphanumeric order descending. Flag images indicative of country of origin.




1942
2.36-inch Rocket Launcher M1 (Bazooka)
The United States Army enjoyed considerable success with its simplistic Bazooka rocket launcher series.
Thumbnail picture of the 2.36-inch Rocket Launcher M1 (Bazooka)

1936
5cm leichte Granatwerfer 36 (leGrW 36)
Though heavy for a light mortar, the leGrW 36 could be carried by a single soldier, his ammunition supply following behind.
Thumbnail picture of the 5cm leichte Granatwerfer 36 (leGrW 36)

1941
7.5cm Leichtgeschutz 40 (LG 40)
The 7.5cm Leichtgeschutz 40 recoilless weapon was developed for use by lightly armed airborne elements of the German military.
Thumbnail picture of the 7.5cm Leichtgeschutz 40 (LG 40)

1943
8.8cm Raketenwerfer 43 (Puppchen)
The 8.8cm Raketenwerfer 43 Puppchen was yet another German Army attempt at providing additional anti-tank firepower to traditional ground infantry.
Thumbnail picture of the 8.8cm Raketenwerfer 43 (Puppchen)

1934
8cm schwere Granatwerfer 34 (GrW 34)
The 8-cm Granatwerfer 34 became the standard German medium mortar beginning in 1934 and saw production and use into 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the 8cm schwere Granatwerfer 34 (GrW 34)

1944
ALFA 44 (Ametralladora ALFA Modelo 44)
The ALFA machine gun saw its birth in World War 2 and went on to see continued use in the post-war years.
Thumbnail picture of the ALFA 44 (Ametralladora ALFA Modelo 44)

1905
Arisaka Type 38
The Type 38 became the standard infantry rifle of the Imperial Army.
Thumbnail picture of the Arisaka Type 38

1912
Arisaka Type 44 Cavalry Rifle
The Arisaka Type 44 Cavalry Rifle was based on the Type 38 carbine, itself based on the Type 38 infantry rifle.
Thumbnail picture of the Arisaka Type 44 Cavalry Rifle

1939
Arisaka Type 99 (Rifle)
The Type 99 rifle was designed from the existing Type 38 infantry rifle, though chambered to fire the more effective 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge.
Thumbnail picture of the Arisaka Type 99 (Rifle)

1942
AUSTEN SMG
The AUSTEN submachine gun was a mix of the British STEN and German MP38/MP40 series.
Thumbnail picture of the AUSTEN SMG

1927
Ballester-Molina / HAFDASA
The Ballester-Molina represented a localized Argentine attempt to produce an effective .45-caliber manstopper with reduced costs.
Thumbnail picture of the Ballester-Molina / HAFDASA

1912
Bangalore Torpedo
The Bangalore Torpedo concept was realized prior to World War 1 and still finds use on the battlefield today.
Thumbnail picture of the Bangalore Torpedo

1915
Beretta Model 1915
The Beretta Model 1915 began the illustrious line of Beretta semi-automatic pistols that continues today.
Thumbnail picture of the Beretta Model 1915

1918
Beretta Model 1918
The Beretta Model of 1918 was nothing more than a heavily-modified Villar-Perosa system with Beretta trigger, single-piece wooden body and bayonet support.
Thumbnail picture of the Beretta Model 1918

1934
Beretta Model 1934
The Beretta Model 1934 was the classic Italian Army service pistol of World War 2, over 1 million units being made.
Thumbnail picture of the Beretta Model 1934

1935
Beretta Model 1935
The Beretta Model 1935 was a lighter-slide version of the preceding Model 1934 semi-automatic pistol design.
Thumbnail picture of the Beretta Model 1935

1942
Beretta Model 38/42/43/44)
The Italian Beretta Model 38 variants of 1942, 1943, and 1944 were further evolutions of the pre-war Model 1938A submachine gun.
Thumbnail picture of the Beretta Model 38/42/43/44)

1938
Beretta Model 38A
The Beretta Model 1938A was a continuation of the Italian submachine gun line begun during World War 1 as the Villa-Perosa.
Thumbnail picture of the Beretta Model 38A

1918
Bergmann MP18/I (Maschinenpistole 18/I)
The Bergmann MP18 is largely considered the first true submachine gun firearm.
Thumbnail picture of the Bergmann MP18/I (Maschinenpistole 18/I)

1890
Berthier Rifle (Series)
The Berthier Rifle line saw an amazing service run from 1890 to the 1960s with over 2 million guns produced.
Thumbnail picture of the Berthier Rifle (Series)

1938
BESA (Gun, Machine, 7.92mm, BESA)
Unlike other Czech-originated guns adopted for British Army service in World War 2, the BESA series retained its original 7.92mm chambering.
Thumbnail picture of the BESA (Gun, Machine, 7.92mm, BESA)

1940
BESAL (Gun, Light, Machine, Faulkner, .303-inch)
The BESAL appeared as a fallback to the continued availability of the BREN LMG, should production of the latter stop due to German bombardment.
Thumbnail picture of the BESAL (Gun, Light, Machine, Faulkner, .303-inch)

1943
Blyskawica SMG
The Blyskawica submachine gun was designed, developed and produced in World War 2 Poland during the German occupation.
Thumbnail picture of the Blyskawica SMG

1937
Boys ATR
The Boys Anti-Tank rifle proved to be of some value for the British Army, particularly against earlier light and medium tank designs of the World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Boys ATR

1927
Brandt mle 27 (Mortier Brandt de 81mm modele 27)
Nearly all modern mortars since have borrowed some of the French Brandt system.
Thumbnail picture of the Brandt mle 27 (Mortier Brandt de 81mm modele 27)

1935
Breda Hand Grenade Model 1935
The Breda Hand Grenade Model 1935 was generally similar to the OTO model of 1935 and both used by the Italian Army of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Breda Hand Grenade Model 1935

1930
Breda Modello 30 (Breda 30)
The Breda Modello 30 became the standard light machine gun of the Italian Army heading into World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Breda Modello 30 (Breda 30)

1938
BREN LMG
Based on an excellent Czechoslovakian design, the equally-excellent BREN Light Machine Gun was adopted into service with the British Army in the late 1930s.
Thumbnail picture of the BREN LMG

1902
Browning Auto-5
The Browning Auto-5 self-loading shotgun was in constant production for nearly 100 years since it arrived in 1902.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning Auto-5

1935
Browning High-Power / FN GP35
The Browning High-Power was the last design of famous American gunsmith John Browning - he died before the pistol went to production.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning High-Power / FN GP35

1917
Browning M1917 (Model 1917)
The Browning M1917 had the distinction of fighting in World War 1, World War 2, the Korean War and the Vietnam War - quite the testament to her original design.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning M1917 (Model 1917)

1918
Browning M1918 BAR (Browning Automatic Rifle)
Though introduced as early as 1918, the M1918 BAR more than proved its worth in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning M1918 BAR (Browning Automatic Rifle)

1919
Browning M1919 GPMG
The Browning M1919 air-cooled machine gun continued the stellar Browning legacy as a reliable battlefield weapon.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning M1919 GPMG

1921
Browning M2 (HMG)
he Browning M2HB represents the heavy barrel evolution in the successful M2 50-Caliber series of heavy machine gun.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning M2 (HMG)

1903
Browning Model 1903 / FN M1903
The FN Model 1903 was designed by American John Browning and sold to the world market through the Belgium firm of Fabrique Nationale.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning Model 1903 / FN M1903

1910
Browning Model 1910 / FN M1910
The FN Model 1910 was the handgun used by Gavrilo Princip to assassinate Archduke Ferdinand in Sarajevo on June 28th, 1914.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning Model 1910 / FN M1910

1922
Browning Model 1922 (Model 1910/1922)
The Browning Model 1922 design was born of a specific Yugoslavian semi-automatic pistol requirement and based on the existing Model 1910.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning Model 1922 (Model 1910/1922)

1892
Carcano Modello 1891 (M91)
The Carcano Modello 1891 service rifle was in constant production from 1892 to 1945 and saw service in both World Wars.
Thumbnail picture of the Carcano Modello 1891 (M91)

1921
Carl Gustav m/21-m37 (Kulsprutegevar KG m/21-m/37)
The Kulsprutegevar KG m/21 and m/37 guns were nothing more than modified Swedish Army versions of the famous American Browning Automatic Rifle.
Thumbnail picture of the Carl Gustav m/21-m37 (Kulsprutegevar KG m/21-m/37)

1942
Carl Gustav m/42 (Automatgevar m/42 / AG m/42 / Ljungman)
Remaining neutral throughout World War 2, the Swedes still worked to stock their armed forces with viable weaponry including the Automatgevar m/42 self-loading rifle.
Thumbnail picture of the Carl Gustav m/42 (Automatgevar m/42 / AG m/42 / Ljungman)

1924
Ceska Zbrojovka vz. 24
The Czech vz. 24 bolt-action rifle proved an excellent service rifle, as showcased by its heavy participation in the wars of the 20th Century.
Thumbnail picture of the Ceska Zbrojovka vz. 24

1927
Ceska Zbrojovka vz. 27
Even the invading Germans of World War 2 though enough of the Czech CZ vz. 27 pistol to incorporate it into their ranks.
Thumbnail picture of the Ceska Zbrojovka vz. 27

1930
Ceska Zbrojovka vz. 30
Like the British BREN, the CZ vz. 30 was a direct descendant of the Czech vz. 26.
Thumbnail picture of the Ceska Zbrojovka vz. 30

1938
Ceska Zbrojovka ZK-383
Though developed as a squad support weapon complete with bipod, the ZK-383 was a submachine gun through and through.
Thumbnail picture of the Ceska Zbrojovka ZK-383

1942
Charlton Automatic Rifle
The Charlton Automatic Rifle was developed to stock New Zealand military units with a capable Bren-like automatic weapon.
Thumbnail picture of the Charlton Automatic Rifle

1929
Chatellerault Model 1929 (modele 1924/29)
The Chatellerault Model 1929 Light Machine Gun was loosely based on the American Browning BAR action.
Thumbnail picture of the Chatellerault Model 1929 (modele 1924/29)

1895
Colt Browning M1895 (Potato Digger)
The Colt-Browning M1895 - the Potato Digger - mated the movement of a lever-action rifle with gas-operated power to produce a new type of air-cooled machine gun.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Browning M1895 (Potato Digger)

1911
Colt M1911
The Colt M1911A1 is regarded by many as the most successful semi-automatic pistol design of her time - seeing consistent action in a plethora of conflicts during the 1900s.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt M1911

1898
Colt Model 1898 (New Service)
The Colt New Service existed under several notable guises and was produced to the tune of some 356,000 examples.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1898 (New Service)

1903
Colt Model 1903 (Pocket Hammerless)
The Colt Model 1903 Pocket Hammerless was yet another firearm design by famed American gunsmith John Browning
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1903 (Pocket Hammerless)

1917
Colt Model 1917
Some 150,000 Colt Model 1917 revolvers were produced from 1917 to 1920 to fill the American World War 1 need for arms.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1917

1943
De Lisle Carbine
The De Lisle Carbine claimed its fair share of sentries and high ranking officials during its operational use in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the De Lisle Carbine

1928
Degtyarev DP LMG (DP28)
The DP light machine gun has proven her worth over countless 20th century conflicts including World War 2, Korea and Vietnam.
Thumbnail picture of the Degtyarev DP LMG (DP28)

1943
Degtyarev DPM LMG
The DPM was an improved and modernized form of the 1928 DP light machine gun.
Thumbnail picture of the Degtyarev DPM LMG

1941
Degtyarev PTRD 1941 (PTRD-41)
The Degtyarev PTRD 1941 rifle was the most numerous of all the Soviet anti-tank rifles of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Degtyarev PTRD 1941 (PTRD-41)

1938
DShK Model 1938
The excellent Soviet-era DShK Heavy Machine Gun entered frontline service with the Red Army in 1938 and, in its modernized form, still maintains and extensive field presence today.
Thumbnail picture of the DShK Model 1938

1932
Enfield No. 2
The Enfield No.2 was the most widely used service revolver among Britain and her Commonwealth nations during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Enfield No. 2

1915
F1 (Hand Grenade - France)
The French F1 served as the basis for the American Mk 1 and Mk 2 designs as well as the Soviet F1.
Thumbnail picture of the F1 (Hand Grenade - France)

1939
F1 (Hand Grenade - Soviet)
The F1 hand grenade saw service throughout World War 2 for the Red Army and in the years following.
Thumbnail picture of the F1 (Hand Grenade - Soviet)

1930
Fabrique Nationale FN M1930 (BAR)
The American M1918 BAR was produced under license in Belgium as the slightly modified FN Mle 1930.
Thumbnail picture of the Fabrique Nationale FN M1930 (BAR)

1933
Fabrique Nationale FN M2HB
The FN M2HB 0.50 caliber machine gun is a variant of the US Browning M2HB, designed to suit European production practices.
Thumbnail picture of the Fabrique Nationale FN M2HB

1932
Fabrique Nationale FN Mle D (BAR)
The FN Mle D was an improved form of the base Mle 1930, which was itself born of the American BAR series.
Thumbnail picture of the Fabrique Nationale FN Mle D (BAR)

1942
Fallschirmjagergewehr 42 (FG42 / FjG42)
The Fallschirmjagergewehr 42 automatic rifle was developed specifically for German paratrooper forces of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Fallschirmjagergewehr 42 (FG42 / FjG42)

1915
Fedorov Avtomat M1916
The Russian Fedorov Avtomat M1916 was introduced during World War 1 and managed an existence into World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Fedorov Avtomat M1916

1935
FEG 35M (Mannlicher M1935)
The FEG 35M bolt-action service rifle saw use in World War 2 and in the failed 1956 Hungarian Revolution.
Thumbnail picture of the FEG 35M (Mannlicher M1935)

1937
FEG Model 37M
The Hungarian Model 37M semi-automatic pistol served Hungarian units as well as German foes in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the FEG Model 37M

1914
FIAT-Revelli Modello 1914
The FIAT-Revelli Model 1914 held too many limiting qualities when compared to the excellent German Maxim, British Vickers and American Browning machine guns of the period.
Thumbnail picture of the FIAT-Revelli Modello 1914

1935
FIAT-Revelli Modello 1935
The FIAT-Revelli Modello 1935 was a failed modernization of the troublesome Modello 1914.
Thumbnail picture of the FIAT-Revelli Modello 1935

1943
Flamethrower, Portable, No 2 (Lifebuoy)
Following the Germans, Soviets and Americans, the British developed their own flamethrower as the Flamethrower, Portable, No 2 - better remembered as the Lifebuoy.
Thumbnail picture of the Flamethrower, Portable, No 2 (Lifebuoy)

1935
Flammenwerfer 35 (FmW 35)
The Flammenwerfer 35 was a refined German Army flamethrower of World War 2, owing its form and function to prior use of such weapons in World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Flammenwerfer 35 (FmW 35)

1941
Flammenwerfer 41 (FmW 41)
The Flammenwerfer 41 of 1941 was an improved form of the Flammenwerfer 35 of 1935.
Thumbnail picture of the Flammenwerfer 41 (FmW 41)

1942
FP-45 (Liberator / OSS Pistol / M1942 Pistol)
As its name suggests, the FP-45 Liberator was meant for use by resistance forces tied to the Allied cause in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the FP-45 (Liberator / OSS Pistol / M1942 Pistol)

1917
Fusil Automatique Modele 1917 (Model 1917 RSC)
The French RSC semi-automatic rifle appeared towards the latter half of World War 1 but managed to see extended service into World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Fusil Automatique Modele 1917 (Model 1917 RSC)

1944
Giandoso TZ-45
The Giandoso TZ-45 submachine gun appeared in the latter half of World War 2 with the Italians but saw greater use with the Burmese Army later.
Thumbnail picture of the Giandoso TZ-45

1943
Goryunov SG-43 HMG
The Goryunov SG-43 Heavy Machine Gun was a successor to the aging PM Model 1910 machine gun line in Soviet Army service.
Thumbnail picture of the Goryunov SG-43 HMG

1945
Gustloff Volkssturmgewehr 1-5 (VG 1-5)
The Gustloff Volkssturmgewehr semi-automatic rifle was a late-war German initiative intended to arm the Volksstrum militia for the final defense of Berlin.
Thumbnail picture of the Gustloff Volkssturmgewehr 1-5 (VG 1-5)

1909
Hotchkiss Model 1909 (Mle 1909 / Benet-Mercie)
The French M1909 was also adopted into service by both the British and the Americans as well as a handful of other nations.
Thumbnail picture of the Hotchkiss Model 1909 (Mle 1909 / Benet-Mercie)

1914
Hotchkiss Model 1914 (Mle 1914)
The French Hotchkiss Model 1914 machine gun was the last of the Hotchkiss machine gun line born in the late 1800s.
Thumbnail picture of the Hotchkiss Model 1914 (Mle 1914)

1889
Infantry Model 1889 (Belgian Mauser)
The Model 1889 was nothing more than the proven German Mauser modified to suit Belgian Army needs.
Thumbnail picture of the Infantry Model 1889 (Belgian Mauser)

1937
Ithaca Model 37
The Ithaca Model 37 pump-action shotgun is still in service after nearly a century.
Thumbnail picture of the Ithaca Model 37

1941
Johnson Light Machine Gun
The Johnson Light Machine Gun was used in limited quantities by several forces of the world during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Johnson Light Machine Gun

1941
Johnson Model 1941
The Johnson Model 1941 lost out to the M1 Garand but still saw some 70,000 examples produced and used during World War 2 and beyond.
Thumbnail picture of the Johnson Model 1941

1935
Kb wz.35 (Marosczek)
The KB wz 35 anti-tank rifle was a pre-World War 2 Polish re-imagining of the classic German Mauser 1918 T-Gewehr ATR.
Thumbnail picture of the Kb wz.35 (Marosczek)

1940
KG m/40 LMG (Knorr-Bremse)
The KG m40 Light Machine Gun was produced in small numbers and became a largely forgotten World War 2 firearms design.
Thumbnail picture of the KG m/40 LMG (Knorr-Bremse)

1915
Kongsberg M/1914 (Kongsberg Colt)
A Colt M1911 by any other name - the licensed-produced Norwegian Kongsberg Colt semi-automatic pistol.
Thumbnail picture of the Kongsberg M/1914 (Kongsberg Colt)

1894
Krag-Jorgensen Model 1894
The Krag-Jorgensen repeat-fire bolt-action rifle was eventually adopted by Norway, the United States and Denmark as their standard army service rifle.
Thumbnail picture of the Krag-Jorgensen Model 1894

1935
Lahti L-35
The Lahti L-35 became a fine semi-automatic pistol example and saw considerable service during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Lahti L-35

1939
Lahti L-39
The Lahti L-39 was a large Finnish anti-tank rifle used in the World War 2 engagements against the Soviet Union, earning itself the nickname of Elephant Gun.
Thumbnail picture of the Lahti L-39

1941
Lanchester (SMG)
The Lanchester was born out of the British need for a reliable submachine gun at the start of World War 2 - its design inspired by the German MP28 SMG.
Thumbnail picture of the Lanchester (SMG)

1935
Lanciafiamme Spalleggiato Modello 1935
The Italian Army joined its contemporaries by fielding a battlefield flamethrower through their Modello 1935 series.
Thumbnail picture of the Lanciafiamme Spalleggiato Modello 1935

1887
Lebel Model 1886
The revolutionary Lebel 8mm bolt-action rifle served the French from 1887 to 1936, becoming the standard French infantry rifle of World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Lebel Model 1886

1895
Lee-Enfield (Series)
The fabulous Lee-Enfield rifle served the British Empire from 1895 through 1957.
Thumbnail picture of the Lee-Enfield (Series)

1914
Lewis Machine Gun
The famous Lewis Machine Gun was used in all manner of ways throughout World War 1 and World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Lewis Machine Gun

1904
Luger P08 (Pistole Parabellum 1908 / Parabellum-Pistole)
The immensely popular Pistole Parabellum Model 1908 semi-automatic pistol - sometimes referred to simply as the Luger - became a German World War 2 stalwart.
Thumbnail picture of the Luger P08 (Pistole Parabellum 1908 / Parabellum-Pistole)

1941
M1 / M1A1 Flamethrower
The M1 / M1A1 series of flamethrowers saw widespread us by American forces in the Pacific Theater.
Thumbnail picture of the M1 / M1A1 Flamethrower

1942
M1 Carbine (US Carbine, Caliber 30, M1)
The lightweight M1 Carbine proved a reliable and robust American firearm during World War 2 and beyond.
Thumbnail picture of the M1 Carbine (US Carbine, Caliber 30, M1)

1936
M1 Garand (United States Rifle, Caliber .30, M1)
The M1 Garand was the principle frontline rifle of American forces worldwide for a time.
Thumbnail picture of the M1 Garand (United States Rifle, Caliber .30, M1)

1938
M1 Thompson (Tommy Gun)
The Famous Thompson submachine gun of World War II was a great piece of engineering.
Thumbnail picture of the M1 Thompson (Tommy Gun)

1941
M17 (T2 Grenade)
The M17 Rifle Grenade was the standard rifle grenade series used by American troops during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the M17 (T2 Grenade)

1917
M1917 Enfield (American Enfield)
The M1917 was a development of the German Mauser 98 rifle series and was produced to the tune of some 2,193,429 examples.
Thumbnail picture of the M1917 Enfield (American Enfield)

1937
M1937 82mm (82-PM 37)
The M1937 mortar was a revision of the M1936, itself based on the excellent French Brandt design of 1927.
Thumbnail picture of the M1937 82mm (82-PM 37)

1939
M1938 120mm (120-HM 38)
The M1938 120mm infantry field mortar - copied from a French design - served the Red Army throughout World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the M1938 120mm (120-HM 38)

1938
M1938 50mm (50-RM 38)
The 50-RM 38 Light Infantry Mortar model of 1938 was consistently evolved by the Soviets throughout World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the M1938 50mm (50-RM 38)

1940
M1940 50mm (50-RM 40)
The 50mm Model 1940 light infantry mortar succeeded the limited model of 1939 though it was itself surpassed by the all-new Model 1941.
Thumbnail picture of the M1940 50mm (50-RM 40)

1941
M1941 82mm (82-PM 41)
The M1941 82mm battalion-level infantry mortar followed the Model of 1937 into service and was modernized in a 1943 initiative.
Thumbnail picture of the M1941 82mm (82-PM 41)

1943
M1943 120mm (120-PM 43)
The 120-PM-43 series 120mm mortar was introduced to Soviet ground forces during 1943.
Thumbnail picture of the M1943 120mm (120-PM 43)

1943
M1943 160mm (MT-13)
The M1943 heavy mortar fired a massive 160mm projectile.
Thumbnail picture of the M1943 160mm (MT-13)

1945
M20 75mm
The M20 Recoilless Rifle saw action towards the end of World War 2 but was in widespread use by the time of the Korean War.
Thumbnail picture of the M20 75mm

1943
M2-2 / M9A1-7
The M2 Flamethrower improved upon the lessons learned through operation of the M1 system.
Thumbnail picture of the M2-2 / M9A1-7

1943
M3 (Grease Gun)
The M3 Grease Gun was simple to operate and cheap to produce - important factors for a wartime weapon.
Thumbnail picture of the M3 (Grease Gun)

1944
M3A1 (Grease Gun) Suppressed
The suppressed M3A1 was a wartime OSS attempt at a special-use M3A1 Grease Gun submachine gun.
Thumbnail picture of the M3A1 (Grease Gun) Suppressed

1941
M9 HEAT
The M9 rifle grenade was the standard anti-tank rifle grenade for American forces in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the M9 HEAT

1888
Mannlicher Model 1888
The Mannlicher Model 1888 was developed in response to the French adoption of the 8mm smokeless powder cartridge which made many existing service rifles obsolete.
Thumbnail picture of the Mannlicher Model 1888

1895
Mannlicher Model 1895
The Mannlicher Model 1895 was a refined form of the Model 1886 and survived both World War 1 and World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Mannlicher Model 1895

1936
MAS 36 (modele 36 / mle 36)
The Fusil MAS 36 service rifle had roots in post-World War 1 France but was slow to enter service before the German invasion of France in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the MAS 36 (modele 36 / mle 36)

1939
MAS 38 (Pistolet Mitrailleur MAS modele 38)
The MAS 38 submachine gun was not available in any useful quantities at the time of the German invasion of France.
Thumbnail picture of the MAS 38 (Pistolet Mitrailleur MAS modele 38)

1932
Maschinengewehr Modell 15 (MG15)
The Rheinmetall MG15 originally appeared as an aircraft gun and then was pressed into service in the ground support role.
Thumbnail picture of the Maschinengewehr Modell 15 (MG15)

1936
Maschinengewehr Modell 34 (MG34)
The German MG34 became the classic machine of the 1930s and saw service throughout World War 2 and for a long period thereafter.
Thumbnail picture of the Maschinengewehr Modell 34 (MG34)

1942
Maschinengewehr Modell 42 (MG42)
The cheaper-to-produce MG42 was much loved by its Wehrmacht users and respected by the Allies who faced it.
Thumbnail picture of the Maschinengewehr Modell 42 (MG42)

1896
Mauser C96
The Mauser C96 saw combat service through World War 1, World War 2, the Korean War and the Vietnam War among other conflicts.
Thumbnail picture of the Mauser C96

1888
Mauser Gewehr 88 (Gew 88 / Model 1888 Reichsgewehr)
The Mauser Gew 88 series of bolt-action service rifles were one of two such weapons stocked in the German inventory during World War 1, the other being the Gew 98.
Thumbnail picture of the Mauser Gewehr 88 (Gew 88 / Model 1888 Reichsgewehr)

1898
Mauser Gewehr 98 (Gew 98)
The Gewehr 98 was the standard German infantry rifle from 1898 up until 1935 and saw combat action from World War 1 into World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Mauser Gewehr 98 (Gew 98)

1935
Mauser Karabiner Kar 98k
The Kar 98k was the standard German bolt-action rifle of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Mauser Karabiner Kar 98k

1908
Maxim MG08 (Maschinengewehr 08)
The arrival of the German Maxim 08 to the battlefield made warfare a bloodier affair.
Thumbnail picture of the Maxim MG08 (Maschinengewehr 08)

1934
Mendoza C-1934 (M1934)
The Mendoza C-1934 was a light machine gun design in the same vein as the American M1918 BAR.
Thumbnail picture of the Mendoza C-1934 (M1934)

1945
Mendoza Model 45
The Mendoza Model 45 was the C-1934 Light Machine Gun chambered for the American .30-06 cartridge and a few other refinements.
Thumbnail picture of the Mendoza Model 45

1915
Mk 1 / Mills Grenade (Mills Bomb)
Over 70 million Mills Bomb grenades were manufacturered from 1915 through 1970
Thumbnail picture of the Mk 1 / Mills Grenade (Mills Bomb)

1918
Mk II / Mk 2 (Pineapple Hand Grenade)
The Mk 2 series of hand grenades in US service were standardized in 1920 and lived on through the 1960s.
Thumbnail picture of the Mk II / Mk 2 (Pineapple Hand Grenade)

1915
Model 24 Stielhandgranate (Stick Grenade / Potato Masher)
The M24 stick grenade was first used in 1915 and continued service with the German Army throughout World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Model 24 Stielhandgranate (Stick Grenade / Potato Masher)

1939
Model 39 Eihandgranate (Mod39) (Egg Hand Grenade)
The Model 39 Egg Hand Grenade entered service with the German Army in 1939 and saw production end in 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Model 39 Eihandgranate (Mod39) (Egg Hand Grenade)

1870
Modello 1870 Italian Vetterli
The Swiss-based Model 1870 Italian Vetterli began life as a single-shot rifle until the late-1870s when a repeat-fire function was added.
Thumbnail picture of the Modello 1870 Italian Vetterli

1900
Mondragon Rifle (Fusil Mondragon)
The Mexican Mondragon Rifle was one of the first self-loading service rifles adopted for frontline military service.
Thumbnail picture of the Mondragon Rifle (Fusil Mondragon)

1935
Mortaio da 81/14 Modello 35
The 81mm Modello 35 infantry mortar was the heaviest mortar in service with Italian Army forces during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Mortaio da 81/14 Modello 35

1935
Mortaio d'assalto 45/5 Brixia, Modello 35
The 45mm Model 35 infantry mortar served as the standard light mortar of Italian Army forces throughout World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Mortaio d'assalto 45/5 Brixia, Modello 35

1942
Mortar, 60mm M19
The handy M19 60mm mortar was intended to replace the M2 60mm but suffered from weak range and accuracy issues.
Thumbnail picture of the Mortar, 60mm M19

1940
Mortar, 60mm M2
God bless the French - the French-inspired 60mm M2 served the American soldier from World War 2 to the Vietnam War.
Thumbnail picture of the Mortar, 60mm M2

1935
Mortar, 81mm M1
The Mortar, 81mm M1, was another French-inspired weapon that went on to see successful combat actions with American forces in World War 2, Korea and Vietnam.
Thumbnail picture of the Mortar, 81mm M1

1891
Mosin-Nagant Model 1891
The Mosin-Nagant M1891 bolt-action rifle was developed by a Russian-Belgium design team and produced in over 37,000,000 examples.
Thumbnail picture of the Mosin-Nagant Model 1891

1945
MP3008 (Maschinenpistole 3008)
A desperate Germany copied the British STEN Mk II submachine gun in the final months of the war.
Thumbnail picture of the MP3008 (Maschinenpistole 3008)

1938
MP38 (Maschinenpistole 38)
The MP38 submachine gun set the mold for future submachine gun designs to follow.
Thumbnail picture of the MP38 (Maschinenpistole 38)

1940
MP40 (Maschinenpistole 40)
The German MP40 Submachine Gun was a refined version of the revolutionary MP38 model intended for mass production.
Thumbnail picture of the MP40 (Maschinenpistole 40)

1941
MP41 (Maschinenpistole 41) / (Schmeisser)
The MP41 was a Schmeisser offshoot of the famous MP40 - a rifle-style stock being used in place of the original metal offering.
Thumbnail picture of the MP41 (Maschinenpistole 41) / (Schmeisser)

1895
Nagant Model 1895 (M1895)
Over 2 million copies of the famous Russian/Soviet Nagant Model of 1895 service revolver were eventually produced into 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Nagant Model 1895 (M1895)

1927
Nambu Type 14
The Type 14 Nambu pistol was in widespread use with the Japanese Army during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Nambu Type 14

1940
No. 68 AT
Produced in the millions, the No. 68 AT Rifle Grenade saw frontline combat with British forces until 1942 after which time they were issued to Home Guard units.
Thumbnail picture of the No. 68 AT

1940
No. 73 AT (N73)
Developed as an anti-tank grenade, the No. 73 lived out her days as a useful demolition charge for engineering units of the British Army.
Thumbnail picture of the No. 73 AT (N73)

1943
No. 82 Grenade (Gammon Bomb)
The No. 82 Gammon Bomb hand grenade was used by the forces of the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the No. 82 Grenade (Gammon Bomb)

1940
Northover Projector
Designed as an anti-tank gun, the Northover Projector held qualities and capabilities more akin to a grenade launcher.
Thumbnail picture of the Northover Projector

1938
Ordnance ML 2-inch Mortar
The Ordnance ML 2-inch Mortar proved a God-send to the British Army, just in time for World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Ordnance ML 2-inch Mortar

1925
Ordnance ML 3-inch Mortar
The Ordnance ML 3-inch Mortar of the British Army was an oft-forgotten contributor to Allied actions in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Ordnance ML 3-inch Mortar

1942
Ordnance ML 4.2-inch Mortar
The Ordnance ML 4.2-inch Heavy Mortar was introduced in 1942 and served the United Kingdom and its allies throughout World War 2 and beyond.
Thumbnail picture of the Ordnance ML 4.2-inch Mortar

1945
Ordnance, RCL, 3.45-inch
The Ordnance RCL 3.45in recoilless rifle design appeared too late to see service during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Ordnance, RCL, 3.45-inch

1943
Orita Model 1941
The first Romanian locally designed and produced submachine gun became the Orita Model 1941 during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Orita Model 1941

1935
OTO Hand Grenade Model 1935
The OTO Model 1935 was one of three major hand grenades featured by the Italian Army in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the OTO Hand Grenade Model 1935

1918
OVP Modello 1918 (Officine Villar Perosa)
The OVP Modello 1918 was nothing more than the original Villar Perosa Modello 1915 halved to serve as a true submachine gun.
Thumbnail picture of the OVP Modello 1918 (Officine Villar Perosa)

1941
Owen SMG (Owen Machine Carbine)
The Owen submachine gun was the only Australian-designed small arm of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Owen SMG (Owen Machine Carbine)

1938
Panzerbuchse 38 (PzB 38)
The World War 2 Panzerbusche 38 series was based on the World War 1-era Mauser T-Gewehr anti-tank gun.
Thumbnail picture of the Panzerbuchse 38 (PzB 38)

1939
Panzerbuchse 39 (PzB 39)
The PzB 39 anti-tank rifle lacked behind the stopping power of her contemporaries by war's end.
Thumbnail picture of the Panzerbuchse 39 (PzB 39)

1943
Panzerfaust 30
The Panzerfaust 30 was an ingenious German disposable anti-tank rocket-launching system of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Panzerfaust 30

1943
Panzerfaust 60
The Panzerfaust 60 was an improved version of the classic Panzerfaust 30 anti-tank system and became the most common form.
Thumbnail picture of the Panzerfaust 60

1943
Panzerschreck (Raketenpanzerbuchse / RPzB)
The Panzerschreck system was based on research garnered from studying the American M1 Bazooka and proved equally effective.
Thumbnail picture of the Panzerschreck (Raketenpanzerbuchse / RPzB)

1942
PIAT (Projector, Infantry, Anti-Tank)
The PIAT grenade launcher was the standard anti-tank weapon for British infantry during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the PIAT (Projector, Infantry, Anti-Tank)

1891
Pistola a Rotazione Modello 1889 (Bodeo)
The Model 1889 Bodeo revolver entered the Italian Army inventory in 1891 and continued service through to the end of World War 2 in 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Pistola a Rotazione Modello 1889 (Bodeo)

1910
Pistola Automatica, Modello 1910 (Glisenti)
The Glisenti Model 1910 semi-automatic pistol failed the Italian Army on many design fronts, eventually superseded by a Beretta design.
Thumbnail picture of the Pistola Automatica, Modello 1910 (Glisenti)

1938
Pistolet wz.35 Vis (Radom)
The Polish Pistolet wz.35 Vis semi-automatic handgun proved one of the best of her kind though the Soviet influence over Poland in the post-WW2 world signified her end.
Thumbnail picture of the Pistolet wz.35 Vis (Radom)

1935
PPD SMG
The Soviet PPD submachine gun series preceded more popular Soviet designs appearing in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the PPD SMG

1942
PPS-42 / PPS-43 SMG
The PPS-42 helped save the people of Leningrad while the PPS-43 became a cheaper production form of the successful submachine gun.
Thumbnail picture of the PPS-42 / PPS-43 SMG

1941
PPSh-41 (Pistolet-Pulemyot Shpagina 41)
The World War 2-era Soviet PPSh-41 submachine is still being encountered on the battlefields of today.
Thumbnail picture of the PPSh-41 (Pistolet-Pulemyot Shpagina 41)

1910
Pulemet Maksima Obrazets Model 1910 (PM Model 1910)
The Pulemet Maksima Obrazets Model 1910 heavy machine gun was a licensed 7.62mm Russian Empire copy of the famous Maxim design.
Thumbnail picture of the Pulemet Maksima Obrazets Model 1910 (PM Model 1910)

1941
Reising Model 50 (M50/M55)
The M50 Reising had a relatively short American military history, being too susceptible to environmental factors to be used as a frontline military firearm.
Thumbnail picture of the Reising Model 50 (M50/M55)

1908
Remington Model 10 (M10)
The Remington Model 10 appeared in both World War 1 and World War 2 with American military forces.
Thumbnail picture of the Remington Model 10 (M10)

1905
Remington Model 11 (M11 / Remington Autoloading Gun)
Unable to secure a new arrangement with Winchester Arms, John Browning brought his Auto-5 self-loading shotgun to competitor Remington which produced it as the Model 11.
Thumbnail picture of the Remington Model 11 (M11 / Remington Autoloading Gun)

1890
Rifle Model 1890 (Turkish Mauser)
The Turkish Model 1890 service rifle was nothing more than the German Mauser Model 1887 by way of the Belgian Mauser Model 1889.
Thumbnail picture of the Rifle Model 1890 (Turkish Mauser)

1935
ROKS (Ranzewuj Ognemjot)
Like other national powers of the interwar years, the Soviet military adopted a flamethrower, this in the form of the ROKS-2
Thumbnail picture of the ROKS (Ranzewuj Ognemjot)

1905
Ross Rifle
The Canadian Ross Rifle was plagued with issues throughout its service life that included World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Ross Rifle

1907
Roth-Steyr Model 1907 (M07)
The Roth-Steyr M07 is credited as being the first self-loading pistol to be accepted by a major army anywhere in the world.
Thumbnail picture of the Roth-Steyr Model 1907 (M07)

1945
RPD (Ruchnoy Pulemyot Degtyaryova)
The RPD Light Machine Gun saw only limited action during the latter stages of World War 2 - though substantial service thereafter.
Thumbnail picture of the RPD (Ruchnoy Pulemyot Degtyaryova)

1940
RPG-40
The RPG-40 anti-tank grenade proved effective agains the earlier Panzer series tanks, lesser so from the arrival of the Panzer IV onwards.
Thumbnail picture of the RPG-40

1943
RPG-43
The RPG-43 series replaced the RPG-40 as a more viable option to disable the newer breeds of German tanks in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the RPG-43

1943
RPG-6 (Ruchnaya Protivotankovaya Granata)
The RPG-6 Anti-Tank Grenade appeared during World War 2 in 1943, following the RPG-40 and RPG-43 lines.
Thumbnail picture of the RPG-6 (Ruchnaya Protivotankovaya Granata)

1935
Savage Arms M720
The Savage M720 semi-automatic auto-loading shotgun was no doubt inspired by previous John Browning designs.
Thumbnail picture of the Savage Arms M720

1905
Schwarzlose MG
The Schwarzlose MG family of machine guns served as the standard machine gun of Austro-Hungarian forces during World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Schwarzlose MG

1941
Simonov PTRS 1941 (PTRS-41)
The Simonov PTRS 1941 rifle proved heavier and more complex than the competing Degtyarov model.
Thumbnail picture of the Simonov PTRS 1941 (PTRS-41)

1945
Simonov SKS (Samozaryadniy Karabin sistemi Simonova)
Approximately 15,000,000 SKS rifles have been produced.
Thumbnail picture of the Simonov SKS (Samozaryadniy Karabin sistemi Simonova)

1908
Smith & Wesson 1st Model New Century (Triple Lock)
While having a relatively limited production run, the Smith & Wesson Triple Lock revolver proved a favorite among those using it.
Thumbnail picture of the Smith & Wesson 1st Model New Century (Triple Lock)

1917
Smith & Wesson Model 1917
The Smith & Wesson Model 1917 was produced - along with the Colt Model 1917 - to fulfill a pistol shortage for the US Army in World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Smith & Wesson Model 1917

1889
Smith & Wesson SW Model 10 (38 Special)
The .38 Special was - and continues to be - a no-frills and popular revolver entry despite its 1899 origins.
Thumbnail picture of the Smith & Wesson SW Model 10 (38 Special)

1938
Solothurn S18-100
The massive Solothurn S18-100 anti-tank rifle was more akin to a portable cannon and saw a short operational service life during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Solothurn S18-100

1930
Solothurn-Steyr S1-100 (MP34)
The Solothurn S1-100 was designed in Germany, developed in Switzerland, and ultimately produced in Austria.
Thumbnail picture of the Solothurn-Steyr S1-100 (MP34)

1903
Springfield M1903 (Model 1903)
The famous Springfield M1903 bolt-action rifle appeared in mass quantities but in few variations - such was the success of the base design.
Thumbnail picture of the Springfield M1903 (Model 1903)

1935
SRCM Hand Grenade Model 1935 / 1938
The SRCM Hand Grenade Model 1935 hand grenade was in service with Italian Army troops throughout World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the SRCM Hand Grenade Model 1935 / 1938

1941
STEN SMG
Born of desperation, the British made good with their war-winning STEN submachine gun series.
Thumbnail picture of the STEN SMG

1944
Sterling Submachine Gun (L2A1)
The Sterling Submachine Gun has served with dozens of global operators and proved itself a viable replacement for the wartime STEN.
Thumbnail picture of the Sterling Submachine Gun (L2A1)

1910
Stevens M520 (Model 520)
The Stevens M520 was yet another design in the storied career of American gunsmith John Browning.
Thumbnail picture of the Stevens M520 (Model 520)

1927
Stevens M620 (Model 620)
The Stevens M620 was a further improved version of the original John Browning-designed Stevens M520 series.
Thumbnail picture of the Stevens M620 (Model 620)

1915
Stokes Mortar (3-inch)
Portability is what made the Stokes Mortar such an important weapon during World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Stokes Mortar (3-inch)

1942
Sturmgewehr 44 (StG44) / Maschinenpistole 44 (MP44)
The German wartime Sturmgewehr 44 system became the predecessor to the modern day assault rifle.
Thumbnail picture of the Sturmgewehr 44 (StG44) / Maschinenpistole 44 (MP44)

1945
Sturmgewehr 45 (StG45(M)) / Maschinenpistole (45 MP45(M))
The StG 45 assault rifle was born from the image of the StG44 series, introducing the innovative roller-delayed blowback system of operation.
Thumbnail picture of the Sturmgewehr 45 (StG45(M)) / Maschinenpistole (45 MP45(M))

1931
Suomi KP/-31 (Konepistooli m/31)
The excellent Finnish Suomi KP/-31 submachine gun served throughout the Winter War against the Soviets and forged an existence into the late 1990s.
Thumbnail picture of the Suomi KP/-31 (Konepistooli m/31)

1938
Tokarev SVT-38
The Tokarev SVT-38 fired the powerful 7.62x54R Russian cartridge but proved too frail once in practice.
Thumbnail picture of the Tokarev SVT-38

1940
Tokarev SVT-40
At least 1.6 million SVT-40 rifles were produced, some seeing action even as recently as the 2nd Chechen War.
Thumbnail picture of the Tokarev SVT-40

1930
Tokarev TT-30
The Tokarev TT-30 sought to replace the old Nagant M1895 revolvers but was itself replaced by the improved TT-33 series by the end of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Tokarev TT-30

1933
Tokarev TT-33
The Tokarev TT-33 pistol served from 1930 to 1965 with over 1,700,000 produced.
Thumbnail picture of the Tokarev TT-33

1921
Type 10 (Grenade)
The indigenously-designed Type 10 fragmentation grenade became the first such weapon to be adopted and issued in quantity to Japanese troops.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 10 (Grenade)

1921
Type 10, 50mm Grenade Discharger
The lightweight Type 10 operated from a trigger action and suffered from limited range.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 10, 50mm Grenade Discharger

1942
Type 100 SMG (100 Shiki Kikan-tanju)
The Type 100 Submachine Gun saw use with Imperial Japanese forces from 1942 through 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 100 SMG (100 Shiki Kikan-tanju)

1922
Type 11 (Light Machine Gun)
Despite her 1922 origins, the Type 11 survived all of World War 2 in frontline service.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 11 (Light Machine Gun)

Type 2 (Rifle Grenade Launcher)
The Type 2 served the Imperial Japanese Army throughout their conquest of the Pacific.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 2 (Rifle Grenade Launcher)

1935
Type 24 (Chiang Kai-Shek Rifle)
The Chinese Type 24 - better known as the Chiang Kai-Shek Rifle - was nothing more than a local copy of the German Mauser rifle.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 24 (Chiang Kai-Shek Rifle)

1943
Type 31 60mm
The Type 31 60mm mortar was a Chinese copy of the American M2 series with a few local alterations to suit Chinese requirements.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 31 60mm

1929
Type 89, 50mm Grenade Discharger
The Type 89 replaced the limited Type 10 grenade launchers by 1941.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 89, 50mm Grenade Discharger

1931
Type 91 (Grenade)
The Type 91 was based on the preceding Type 10 series of fragmentation grenades and utilized into 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 91 (Grenade)

1932
Type 92 Shiki Kikanju (HMG)
The Type 92 heavy machine gun was nicknamed the Woodpecker due to its distinct stuttering sound when fired.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 92 Shiki Kikanju (HMG)

1933
Type 93 / Type 100
The Imperial Japanese Army and Marine forces utilized two primary flamethrower types - one being the Type 93 series.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 93 / Type 100

1935
Type 94 90mm
The Type 94 90mm infantry mortar debuted with IJA forces in 1935.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 94 90mm

1936
Type 96 (Light Machine Gun)
The Type 96 Light Machine Gun superceded the Type 11 Light Machine Gun of 1922.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 96 (Light Machine Gun)

1937
Type 97 (Grenade)
The Type 97 hand grenade was the standard issue grenade of Japanese troops throughout World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 97 (Grenade)

1937
Type 97 81mm
The Type 97 81mm infantry mortar served the Japanese Army throughout World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 97 81mm

1937
Type 97 90mm (mortar)
The Type 97 90mm Infantry Mortar saw only limited production reaching some 600 examples during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 97 90mm (mortar)

1939
Type 97 ATR (Kyuunana-Shiki Jidouho)
The large-caliber Type 97 did not endear itself to her crews, for the massive recoil effect was something to be experienced.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 97 ATR (Kyuunana-Shiki Jidouho)

1939
Type 99 (Grenade)
The Type 99 hand grenade was an improved form of the Type 97 series of 1937.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 99 (Grenade)

1939
Type 99 LMG
The Type 99 Light Machine Gun was developed to coincide with the arrival of the new Type 99 rifle using the 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 99 LMG

1942
United Defense UD-42 (Model 42 / M42)
The United Defense UD-42 submachine gun failed to succeed the storied M1 Thompson line but found service during World War 2 with various partisan groups.
Thumbnail picture of the United Defense UD-42 (Model 42 / M42)

1912
Vickers Machine Gun (Gun, Machine, Vickers, .303in, Mk 1)
The Vickers machine gun system had a spectacular operational run, earning nods in two world wars and countless regional conflicts the world over.
Thumbnail picture of the Vickers Machine Gun (Gun, Machine, Vickers, .303in, Mk 1)

1925
Vickers-Berthier (VB) LMG
The Vickers-Berthier Light Machine Gun proved a reliable weapon but it was only accepted into service with a handful of countries - most notably, India.
Thumbnail picture of the Vickers-Berthier (VB) LMG

1945
Volkssturmgewehr VG (Series)
The Volksturm VG bolt-action rifle series was one of the last-ditch attempts by the Nazi regime at arming its citizens.
Thumbnail picture of the Volkssturmgewehr VG (Series)

1941
Walther Gewehr 41 (G41 / Gew 41)
The German Gewehr 41 self-loading rifle was limited in its production during World War 2 and thus limited in combat service.
Thumbnail picture of the Walther Gewehr 41 (G41 / Gew 41)

1943
Walther Gewehr 43 (G43 / Gew 43)
With help from the Soviets, the Gew 43 improved upon the Gew 41 but was never the semi-automatic rifle envisioned by the German Army.
Thumbnail picture of the Walther Gewehr 43 (G43 / Gew 43)

1938
Walther P38 (Pistole 38)
Developed to replace the famous Luger 08 pistol, the Walther P38 went on to make its own well-recognized history during and after World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Walther P38 (Pistole 38)

1929
Walther PP (Polizei Pistole)
The Walther PP semi-automatic pistol was a hugely popular sidearm after its introduction in 1929, spawning the more-compact PPK line some time later.
Thumbnail picture of the Walther PP (Polizei Pistole)

1931
Walther PPK (Polizei Pistole Kriminalmodell)
The success of the earlier Walther PP line prompted the new, more compact Walther PPK to be introduced soon after.
Thumbnail picture of the Walther PPK (Polizei Pistole Kriminalmodell)

1887
Webley Model 1887
The long-running Webley Service Revolver series began in 1887 and saw consistent service into the Cold War years.
Thumbnail picture of the Webley Model 1887

1939
Welrod (Assassin's Pistol)
The Welrod appeared in World War 2 for use by special forces and resistance elements.
Thumbnail picture of the Welrod (Assassin's Pistol)

1897
Winchester Model 1897
The Winchester Model 1897 pump-action slide shotgun was a further refinement of the John Browning-designed Winchester Model 1893 slide-action series.
Thumbnail picture of the Winchester Model 1897

1912
Winchester Model 1912
The Winchester Model 1912 pump-action shotgun saw use throughout two World Wars, the Korean War and the Vietnam War in US military service.
Thumbnail picture of the Winchester Model 1912

1915
Winchester Model 1915
The Winchester Model 1895 served as the basis of the Model 1915 delivered in its modified form to Imperial Russian forces for service in World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Winchester Model 1915

1936
Winchester Model 70
The Winchester Model 70 bolt-action rifle has seen considerable usage since its introduction in 1936.
Thumbnail picture of the Winchester Model 70

1929
ZH-29
The Czech ZH-29 found few takers during various evaluations in the 1930s.
Thumbnail picture of the ZH-29

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