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Military Factory

Pistols and Handguns

Last Updated: 5/12/2015

As technology allowed for more compact, mechanically-actuated forms, the pistol replaced the sabre as the standard sidearm in battle.


The handgun has its origins in 14th Century China where they began life as crude, muzzle-loaded instruments and known literally as "hand cannons". Their evolution continued into the following centuries where they remained muzzle-loading but became more streamlined, portable instruments of war. The "pistol" came about in 16th Century Europe and lay the foundation of the modern handgun. Gunsmiths persevered to find solutions for firing actions and support for multiple shots leading to the development of the revolver. Semi-automatic designs gained considerable popularity during the early part of the 20th Century and eventually replaced revolvers as the main sidearm of military forces.


There are a total of (151) Pistols and Handguns in the Military Factory. Entries are listed below by alphanumeric order descending. Flag images indicative of country of origin.




1848
Allen & Thurber Single-Shot
This Allen & Thurber design was a peculiar-looking single-shot pistol intended for competition.
Thumbnail picture of the Allen & Thurber Single-Shot

1977
AMT Hardballer
The AMT Hardballer line of semi-automatic pistols are copies of the famous Colt M1911 sidearm.
Thumbnail picture of the AMT Hardballer

2012
Arsenal Firearms AF-1 (Strike One)
The Italian-Russian Arsenal Firearms AF-1 may become the next standard-issue sidearm for Russian military forces moving forward.
Thumbnail picture of the Arsenal Firearms AF-1 (Strike One)

1927
Ballester-Molina / HAFDASA
The Ballester-Molina represented a localized Argentine attempt to produce an effective .45-caliber manstopper with reduced costs.
Thumbnail picture of the Ballester-Molina / HAFDASA

1990
Beretta M9
The Beretta M9, based largely on the Italian Beretta M92F model, has been the primary sidearm of the United States Army since adoption in 1990.
Thumbnail picture of the Beretta M9

1915
Beretta Model 1915
The Beretta Model 1915 began the illustrious line of Beretta semi-automatic pistols that continues today.
Thumbnail picture of the Beretta Model 1915

1934
Beretta Model 1934
The Beretta Model 1934 was the classic Italian Army service pistol of World War 2, over 1 million units being made.
Thumbnail picture of the Beretta Model 1934

1935
Beretta Model 1935
The Beretta Model 1935 was a lighter-slide version of the preceding Model 1934 semi-automatic pistol design.
Thumbnail picture of the Beretta Model 1935

1975
Beretta Model 92
The Italian Beretta Model 92 has seen its fair share of international success since its inception in 1975.
Thumbnail picture of the Beretta Model 92

1986
Beretta Model 93R
The Beretta Model 93R was categorized as a machine pistol and was based on the successful Beretta Model 92 semi-automatic handgun.
Thumbnail picture of the Beretta Model 93R

2004
Beretta Px4 Storm
The storied Italian concern of Beretta is still releasing capable semi-automatic handguns as is the case with the Px4 Storm series.
Thumbnail picture of the Beretta Px4 Storm

1750
British Sea Service Pistol
The British Sea Service Pistol managed a healthy service life covering decades and several major conflicts of the period.
Thumbnail picture of the British Sea Service Pistol

1983
Browning BDA (Browning Double-Action)
The Browning BDA semi-automatic pistol is based on the proven Browning High-Power of the 1930s.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning BDA (Browning Double-Action)

1935
Browning High-Power / FN GP35
The Browning High-Power was the last design of famous American gunsmith John Browning - he died before the pistol went to production.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning High-Power / FN GP35

1900
Browning Model 1900 / FN M1900 / Browning No. 1
John Brownings first success in the pistol market came in the form of the M1900.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning Model 1900 / FN M1900 / Browning No. 1

1903
Browning Model 1903 / FN M1903
The FN Model 1903 was designed by American John Browning and sold to the world market through the Belgium firm of Fabrique Nationale.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning Model 1903 / FN M1903

1910
Browning Model 1910 / FN M1910
The FN Model 1910 was the handgun used by Gavrilo Princip to assassinate Archduke Ferdinand in Sarajevo on June 28th, 1914.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning Model 1910 / FN M1910

1922
Browning Model 1922 (Model 1910/1922)
The Browning Model 1922 design was born of a specific Yugoslavian semi-automatic pistol requirement and based on the existing Model 1910.
Thumbnail picture of the Browning Model 1922 (Model 1910/1922)

2004
Brugger & Thomet MP9
The Swiss Brugger & Thomet MP9 machine pistol is a further development of the Austrian-originated Steyr TMP series.
Thumbnail picture of the Brugger & Thomet MP9

2007
Caracal CP
The Caracal CP series of semi-automatic pistol marks the first such weapon to emerge from the United Arab Emirates.
Thumbnail picture of the Caracal CP

1976
Ceska Zbrojovka CZ75 (Phantom)
The Czech CZ 75 semi-automatic pistol proved a success, seeing over 1 million of its type produced since 1976.
Thumbnail picture of the Ceska Zbrojovka CZ75 (Phantom)

1927
Ceska Zbrojovka vz. 27
Even the invading Germans of World War 2 though enough of the Czech CZ vz. 27 pistol to incorporate it into their ranks.
Thumbnail picture of the Ceska Zbrojovka vz. 27

1961
Ceska Zbrojovka vz. 61 (Skorpion)
At its core, the Skorpion is a cross between a pistol and a submachine gun.
Thumbnail picture of the Ceska Zbrojovka vz. 61 (Skorpion)

1990
Colt Anaconda
The Colt Anaconda followed the famous Colt Python into existence, going with a larger cartridge and ending up as one of the most accurate of revolvers ever made.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Anaconda

1911
Colt M1911
The Colt M1911A1 is regarded by many as the most successful semi-automatic pistol design of her time - seeing consistent action in a plethora of conflicts during the 1900s.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt M1911

1986
Colt MEU(SOC)
The MEU SOC is an improved M1911 series .45 caliber pistol in service with the US Marine Corps.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt MEU(SOC)

1848
Colt Model 1848 (Baby Dragoon)
The Model 1848 Baby Dragoon was intended for the civilian market as a lighter-weight, more compact form of the full-sized military-minded Dragoon model of 1948.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1848 (Baby Dragoon)

1851
Colt Model 1851 Navy
The Colt 1851 Navy revolver became one of the most popular handguns ever produced, seeing totals reach some 250,000 examples by 1873.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1851 Navy

1855
Colt Model 1855 (Root Revolver)
The Colt Model 1855 - otherwise known as the Root Revolver - was the first Colt revolver to feature a solid frame design.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1855 (Root Revolver)

1860
Colt Model 1860 New Army
The Colt New Army Model 1860 revolver was produced in the hundreds of thousands during the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1860 New Army

1861
Colt Model 1861 Navy
Some 39,000 examples of the Colt 1861 Navy revolver were produced.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1861 Navy

1862
Colt Model 1862 Pocket Navy
The Colt Model 1861 Pocket Navy was more or less a smaller version of the successful Model 1851 Navy sold a decade prior.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1862 Pocket Navy

1898
Colt Model 1898 (New Service)
The Colt New Service existed under several notable guises and was produced to the tune of some 356,000 examples.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1898 (New Service)

1903
Colt Model 1903 (Pocket Hammerless)
The Colt Model 1903 Pocket Hammerless was yet another firearm design by famed American gunsmith John Browning
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1903 (Pocket Hammerless)

1917
Colt Model 1917
Some 150,000 Colt Model 1917 revolvers were produced from 1917 to 1920 to fill the American World War 1 need for arms.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1917

1955
Colt Python
The Colt Python is considered by many to be the best production revolver ever made.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Python

1873
Colt Single Action Army (Colt 45 / Peacemaker)
Concerning the American Wild West, the Colt Single Action Army revolver became the stuff of legend.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Single Action Army (Colt 45 / Peacemaker)

1860
Cooper Pocket Double Action
The Cooper Pocket percussion revolver utilized a double-action method, unlike other single-action guns of the day
Thumbnail picture of the Cooper Pocket Double Action

1825
Deringer (Derringer Pocket Pistol)
Derringer - note double R - became the generic name for a class of concealable small pistols following the original Deringer-family designs.
Thumbnail picture of the Deringer (Derringer Pocket Pistol)

1842
Deringer Model 1842 Navy
The Deringer Model 1842 Navy percussion pistol became the first US government-purchased pistol to feature a percussion cap action and rifled barrel design.
Thumbnail picture of the Deringer Model 1842 Navy

1850
Devisme Percussion Revolver
The Devisme percussion revolver was produced and decorated to the highest of standards.
Thumbnail picture of the Devisme Percussion Revolver

1765
Duval Model 1765
The Duval a Nantes flintlock pistol emerged between 1760 and 1770 and was conventional in every way.
Thumbnail picture of the Duval Model 1765

1880
Enfield Mk I / Mk II
The Enfield Mk series service revolvers saw short-lived use with British Army and Canadian North-West Mounted Police.
Thumbnail picture of the Enfield Mk I / Mk II

1932
Enfield No. 2
The Enfield No.2 was the most widely used service revolver among Britain and her Commonwealth nations during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Enfield No. 2

2000
Fabrique Nationale Five-seveN
The Fabrique Nationale FN Five-SeveN receives its rather unique name from the caliber of its ammunition - 5.7x28mm.
Thumbnail picture of the Fabrique Nationale Five-seveN

1974
Fabrique Nationale FN Barracuda
The FN Barracuda revolver appeared in limited quantities with some security forces around the world.
Thumbnail picture of the Fabrique Nationale FN Barracuda

1937
FEG Model 37M
The Hungarian Model 37M semi-automatic pistol served Hungarian units as well as German foes in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the FEG Model 37M

1942
FP-45 (Liberator / OSS Pistol / M1942 Pistol)
As its name suggests, the FP-45 Liberator was meant for use by resistance forces tied to the Allied cause in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the FP-45 (Liberator / OSS Pistol / M1942 Pistol)

1820
Francotte Pinfire
The well-made Francotte Pinfire revolver was designed by August Francotte out of Liege, Belgium.
Thumbnail picture of the Francotte Pinfire

1898
Gasser & Rast Model 1898
The Gasser & Rast Model 1898 revolver was accepted into service with the Austro-Hungarian Army.
Thumbnail picture of the Gasser & Rast Model 1898

1870
Gasser Model 1870 Army Service
The Model 1870 was the standard sidearm of Austro-Hungarian cavalry units.
Thumbnail picture of the Gasser Model 1870 Army Service

1983
Glock 17
The Glock 17 has been adopted for military, police and security service the world over.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 17

1985
Glock 18
The Glock 18 allowed the ability to fire in both semi- and full-automatic modes from a 33-round high capacity magazine.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 18

1988
Glock 19
The Glock 19 was the compact version of the Glock 17 model series of Austria.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 19

1990
Glock 20
The Glock 20 was larger and heavier than the Glock 17, firing the equally-larger 10mm Auto cartridge.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 20

1990
Glock 21
The Glock 21 was based on the Glock 20 but firing the large American .45 ACP cartridge.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 21

1990
Glock 22
The Glock 22 was chambered to fire the .40 S&W cartridge but was otherwise the same form and function as the Glock 17.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 22

1990
Glock 23
The Glock 23 was similar to the Glock 19 but chambered to fire the .40 S&W cartridge.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 23

1992
Glock 24
The Glock 24 was a spin-off of the Glock 17, though chambered to fire the .40 S&W cartridge.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 24

1995
Glock 25
The Glock 25 sported the same dimensions as the Glock 19 and chambered the .380 ACP cartridge.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 25

1996
Glock 26
The Glock 26 was designed as a small pistol that still carried the capabilities of its larger brethren.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 26

1996
Glock 27
The Glock 27 shared similarities to the Glock 26, both being smaller alternatives to the larger Glocks yet still retaining all capabilities.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 27

1997
Glock 28
The Glock 28 produced along the same lines as the small Glock 26 and Glock 27 pistols.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 28

Glock 29
The Glock 29 made use of the 10mm cartridge, a powerful round as subcompact pistols go.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 29

1988
Glock 30
The Glock 30 gained popularity in the United States thanks to the use of the .45 ACP round.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 30

1996
Glock 31
The Glock 31 was developed specifically to use the popular .357 SIG cartridge and based on the Glock 22 model.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 31

1998
Glock 32
The Glock 32 was designed for use with law enforcement in mind, firing the powerful .357 SIG cartridge.
Thumbnail picture of the Glock 32

1805
Harpers Ferry Model 1805
The Model 1805 became the first American pistol to be manufactured by a US military arsenal.
Thumbnail picture of the Harpers Ferry Model 1805

1969
Heckler & Koch HK P9
The Heckler and Koch P9 series of semi-automatic handguns emerged from West Germany in 1969.
Thumbnail picture of the Heckler & Koch HK P9

1996
Heckler & Koch Mk 23 Mod 0 (SOCOM Pistol)
The SOCOM pistol was based on a modified form of the HK USP.
Thumbnail picture of the Heckler & Koch Mk 23 Mod 0 (SOCOM Pistol)

1993
Heckler & Koch USP (Universal Self-Loading Pistol)
The HK USP semi-automatic pistol entered production in 1993 and still sees service today.
Thumbnail picture of the Heckler & Koch USP (Universal Self-Loading Pistol)

1813
Henry Model 1813 Navy
The Henry Model 1813 Navy pistol was known to be carried into battle by US Navy hero Oliver Hazard Perry during the War of 1812.
Thumbnail picture of the Henry Model 1813 Navy

1999
HS Produkt HS2000 (Springfield XD)
The HS2000 / Springfield XD has proven a popular sidearm in military, police and civilian circles the world over.
Thumbnail picture of the HS Produkt HS2000 (Springfield XD)

1995
HS Produkt HS-95
Civil war across Yugoslavia forced the Zastava CZ99 to become the Croatian HS-95.
Thumbnail picture of the HS Produkt HS-95

1973
IMBEL Pistola 9 M973
The IMBEL Pistola 9 M973 was nothing more than a license copy of the American M1911A1 .45 ACP pistol chambered for the 9x19mm Parabellum cartridge.
Thumbnail picture of the IMBEL Pistola 9 M973

1980
IMI Mini-UZI
The Mini-UZI appeared after the base UZI and proved a more compact form of the original.
Thumbnail picture of the IMI Mini-UZI

1990
Jericho 941
The Jericho series of handguns has seen production since 1990.
Thumbnail picture of the Jericho 941

1836
Johnson Model 1836
The Johnson Model 1836 was sold to the US government by way of contract for nine dollars a pistol.
Thumbnail picture of the Johnson Model 1836

2006
Kel-Tec PF-9
Intended for quick reaction and concealment in the security role, the Kel-Tec 9mm does not fail in those qualities.
Thumbnail picture of the Kel-Tec PF-9

1915
Kongsberg M/1914 (Kongsberg Colt)
A Colt M1911 by any other name - the licensed-produced Norwegian Kongsberg Colt semi-automatic pistol.
Thumbnail picture of the Kongsberg M/1914 (Kongsberg Colt)

1935
Lahti L-35
The Lahti L-35 became a fine semi-automatic pistol example and saw considerable service during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Lahti L-35

1823
Lefaucheux 20-Round
This Lefaucheux revolver tried to make use of twenty 7.65mm cartridges firing from a double-barrel arrangement.
Thumbnail picture of the Lefaucheux 20-Round

1861
LeMat (Grape Shot Revolver)
The twin-barrel, nine-shot LeMat service revolver achieved fame during the American Civil War - sporting a second barrel firing 16-gauge buckshot.
Thumbnail picture of the LeMat (Grape Shot Revolver)

1869
Liege Model 1869
The Liege Model 1869 pinfire revolver could accept an ungainly bayonet configuration slung underneath the barrel by way of a mounting lug.
Thumbnail picture of the Liege Model 1869

1860
Lindsay Model 1860
New York inventor John P. Lindsay developed his 1860 Twin-Shot pistol to provide for a psuedo-repeating firing action as a workaround for Colt revolver patents.
Thumbnail picture of the Lindsay Model 1860

1904
Luger P08 (Pistole Parabellum 1908 / Parabellum-Pistole)
The immensely popular Pistole Parabellum Model 1908 semi-automatic pistol - sometimes referred to simply as the Luger - became a German World War 2 stalwart.
Thumbnail picture of the Luger P08 (Pistole Parabellum 1908 / Parabellum-Pistole)

1985
Magnum Research / IMI Desert Eagle
The impressive-looking Desert Eagle handgun is capable of firing the .50 Action Express round.
Thumbnail picture of the Magnum Research / IMI Desert Eagle

1951
Makarov PM (Pistol Marakova)
The Makarov PM served as the standard Soviet Army pistol for forty years, ending its reign in 1991.
Thumbnail picture of the Makarov PM (Pistol Marakova)

1859
Manhattan Navy
After Colt patents had expired, firms like the Manhattan Firearms Company copied successful Colt revolver designs such as the Navy.
Thumbnail picture of the Manhattan Navy

1900
Mannlicher Model 1900 (Series)
The excellent Mannlicher Model 1900 series suffered from a glut of security small arms flooding the market prior to World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Mannlicher Model 1900 (Series)

1909
Mannlicher Selbstladepistole Model 1903
The Model 1903 was evaluated by a variety of armies but none selected it as their standard pistol.
Thumbnail picture of the Mannlicher Selbstladepistole Model 1903

1873
MAS Modele 1873 / Modele 1874
The Modele 1873 became the first centerfire and Double-Action revolver to reach service with the French Army.
Thumbnail picture of the MAS Modele 1873 / Modele 1874

1892
MAS Modele D'ordonnance 1892 (8mm Lebel)
The Modele 1892 was designed as an all-new replacement for the Model 1873 and Model 1874 revolvers and fired a new smokeless cartridge.
Thumbnail picture of the MAS Modele D'ordonnance 1892 (8mm Lebel)

1896
Mauser C96
The Mauser C96 saw combat service through World War 1, World War 2, the Korean War and the Vietnam War among other conflicts.
Thumbnail picture of the Mauser C96

1864
Metropolitan Navy Percussion
When the Colt East Armory was lost to fire during the American Civil War, Metropolitan Arms took to producing copies of the Colt Navy revolver.
Thumbnail picture of the Metropolitan Navy Percussion

1895
Nagant Model 1895 (M1895)
Over 2 million copies of the famous Russian/Soviet Nagant Model of 1895 service revolver were eventually produced into 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Nagant Model 1895 (M1895)

1927
Nambu Type 14
The Type 14 Nambu pistol was in widespread use with the Japanese Army during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Nambu Type 14

1998
NORINCO QSZ-92 (Type 92)
The QSZ-92 semi-automatic pistol is currently in service with the Chinese Army.
Thumbnail picture of the NORINCO QSZ-92 (Type 92)

1959
NORINCO Type 59 (Makarov)
The Type 59 pistol is a Chinese copy of the Soviet Makarov semi-automatic pistol design with slight variations.
Thumbnail picture of the NORINCO Type 59 (Makarov)

1980
NORINCO Type 64 Silenced
The Chinese Type 64 Silenced Pistol utilized a large and crude-looking silencer assembly to allow for clandestine work.
Thumbnail picture of the NORINCO Type 64 Silenced

1882
Ordnance Revolver Model 1882
The Model 1882 was designed around an all-new 7.5x23R cartridge, both developed by Lieutenant-Colonel Rudolf Schmidt.
Thumbnail picture of the Ordnance Revolver Model 1882

1910
Pistola Automatica, Modello 1910 (Glisenti)
The Glisenti Model 1910 semi-automatic pistol failed the Italian Army on many design fronts, eventually superseded by a Beretta design.
Thumbnail picture of the Pistola Automatica, Modello 1910 (Glisenti)

1938
Pistolet wz.35 Vis (Radom)
The Polish Pistolet wz.35 Vis semi-automatic handgun proved one of the best of her kind though the Soviet influence over Poland in the post-WW2 world signified her end.
Thumbnail picture of the Pistolet wz.35 Vis (Radom)

1879
Reichsrevolver Model 1879
The Model 1879 Reichsrevolver was born out of a German military modernization program.
Thumbnail picture of the Reichsrevolver Model 1879

1883
Reichsrevolver Model 1883 (Dreyse)
The Model 1883 Reichsrevolver was essentially the Model 1879 produced to a higher officer standard.
Thumbnail picture of the Reichsrevolver Model 1883 (Dreyse)

1861
Remington Model 1858 Army
The Remington Model 1858 proved hugely popular during the American Civil War for its inherent structural strength, firepower and reliability.
Thumbnail picture of the Remington Model 1858 Army

1862
Remington Model 1861 Navy
Roughly 7,000 of the Remington Model 1861 Navy revolver were produced, many seeing heavy action in the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Remington Model 1861 Navy

1875
Remington Model 1875 New Army
Despite the strong Remington revolver pedigree, the Model 1875 New Army could not compete with the popular Colt Peacemaker line.
Thumbnail picture of the Remington Model 1875 New Army

1907
Roth-Steyr Model 1907 (M07)
The Roth-Steyr M07 is credited as being the first self-loading pistol to be accepted by a major army anywhere in the world.
Thumbnail picture of the Roth-Steyr Model 1907 (M07)

1985
Ruger P (Series)
The Ruger P name designates a line of modern, semi-automatic pistols available in various chamberings.
Thumbnail picture of the Ruger P (Series)

2007
Sarsilmaz Kilinc 2000 (ArmaLite AR-24)
Introduced in 2007, the Sarsilmaz Kilinc 2000 series pistol serves both the Turkish Army and select Turkish police forces.
Thumbnail picture of the Sarsilmaz Kilinc 2000 (ArmaLite AR-24)

1760
Sharpe Model 1760
The Sharpe flintlock pistol was typically taken on through private purchase by Royal Navy officers.
Thumbnail picture of the Sharpe Model 1760

1975
SIG-Sauer P220 (Pistole 75 / Model 75)
The SIG-Sauer P220 opened up the successful family of semi-automatic pistols.
Thumbnail picture of the SIG-Sauer P220 (Pistole 75 / Model 75)

1984
SIG-Sauer P226
The SIG-Sauer P226 failed to net the lucrative US Army pistol contract but nevertheless made for itself a global presence elsewhere.
Thumbnail picture of the SIG-Sauer P226

1988
SIG-Sauer P228 (M11)
The SIG-Sauer P228 resides in the inventories of many armies and is known in the US inventory as the M11.
Thumbnail picture of the SIG-Sauer P228 (M11)

1971
Simonov SPP-1
The Simonov SPP-1 was developed for specialist forces as an underwater-firing pistol.
Thumbnail picture of the Simonov SPP-1

2005
Smith & Wesson M&P (Military and Police)
The Smith and Wesson M and P model is a dual-service product for use by military and police units.
Thumbnail picture of the Smith & Wesson M&P (Military and Police)

1869
Smith & Wesson Model 3
The Smith & Wesson Model 3 was given several useful qualities in its design including an ejector system which cleared all six chambers at once.
Thumbnail picture of the Smith & Wesson Model 3

1993
Smith & Wesson Sigma
The Smith and Wesson Sigma is available in several caliber types and features synthetic construction throughout.
Thumbnail picture of the Smith & Wesson Sigma

1889
Smith & Wesson SW Model 10 (38 Special)
The .38 Special was - and continues to be - a no-frills and popular revolver entry despite its 1899 origins.
Thumbnail picture of the Smith & Wesson SW Model 10 (38 Special)

1955
Smith & Wesson SW Model 29 (.44 Magnum)
The Smith & Wesson Model 29 became famous thanks to Clint Eastwood and his Dirty Harry character.
Thumbnail picture of the Smith & Wesson SW Model 29 (.44 Magnum)

1981
Smith & Wesson SW Model 686
Smith & Wesson devised the Model 686 with the specialist user in mind
Thumbnail picture of the Smith & Wesson SW Model 686

1817
Springfield Model 1817
The Model 1817 emerged from the burgeoning Armory at Springfield, Massachusetts.
Thumbnail picture of the Springfield Model 1817

1990
Star 30
The Spanish Star 30 series utilized an internally running slide and appeared in the 30M and 30PK forms.
Thumbnail picture of the Star 30

1858
Starr DA
The Starr Revolver saw limited service during the American Civil War in both Single- and Double-Action forms.
Thumbnail picture of the Starr DA

1974
Steyr GB
The Steyr GB system had to meet and overcome many obstacles in its design evolution.
Thumbnail picture of the Steyr GB

1999
Steyr M (Series)
Steyr M designates a line of serviceable semi-automatic pistols emerging from Austrian gunmaker Steyr-Mannlicher.
Thumbnail picture of the Steyr M (Series)

1969
Steyr MPi 69
The outward design of the Steyr MPi 69 is not unlike the Israeli UZI or American MAC 10 series of submachine guns.
Thumbnail picture of the Steyr MPi 69

1993
Steyr TMP / SPP
The Steyr TMP is a machine pistol capable of firing up to 900 rounds per minute from a 15- or 30-round box magazine.
Thumbnail picture of the Steyr TMP / SPP

Stocking Pepperbox
The Stocking Pepperbox was interesting in that it employed six rotating barrels as opposed to a single barrel with a six-round rotating cylinder.
Thumbnail picture of the Stocking Pepperbox

2005
Taurus Millennium
Introduced in 2005, the Brazilian-originated Taurus Millennium series has seen various models emerge.
Thumbnail picture of the Taurus Millennium

1995
Taurus Model 605
Simplicity and ruggedness are qualities marketed with the Brazilian Taurus Model 605 five-round revolver.
Thumbnail picture of the Taurus Model 605

2003
Taurus Model 856
Geared for use in the self-defense role, the Taurus Model 856 features a very short barrel for compactness and a useful five-round capacity.
Thumbnail picture of the Taurus Model 856

1984
Taurus PT92
Expiring patents on the Beretta 92 allowed Brazilian gunmaker Taurus to reproduce the line as its PT92 series.
Thumbnail picture of the Taurus PT92

1930
Tokarev TT-30
The Tokarev TT-30 sought to replace the old Nagant M1895 revolvers but was itself replaced by the improved TT-33 series by the end of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Tokarev TT-30

1933
Tokarev TT-33
The Tokarev TT-33 pistol served from 1930 to 1965 with over 1,700,000 produced.
Thumbnail picture of the Tokarev TT-33

1967
Type 51
The Type 51 pistol is nothing more than a direct copy of the Soviet made TT-33 handgun, with some external differences in design.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 51

1992
Vektor SP
The Vektor SP series of pistols was first introduced during 1992 and has been adopted by the forces of South Africa, Malaysia, and Singapore.
Thumbnail picture of the Vektor SP

1989
Vektor Z-88
The Vektor Z-88 is nothing more than a direct license-built copy of the Italian Beretta Model 92 pistol.
Thumbnail picture of the Vektor Z-88

2003
Walther P22
In production since 2003, the Walther P22 semi-automatic pistol is another viable .22 LR chambered handgun available to discerning shooters.
Thumbnail picture of the Walther P22

1938
Walther P38 (Pistole 38)
Developed to replace the famous Luger 08 pistol, the Walther P38 went on to make its own well-recognized history during and after World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Walther P38 (Pistole 38)

1996
Walther P99
The Walther P99 is available in three distinct trigger variants and two different frame forms.
Thumbnail picture of the Walther P99

1929
Walther PP (Polizei Pistole)
The Walther PP semi-automatic pistol was a hugely popular sidearm after its introduction in 1929, spawning the more-compact PPK line some time later.
Thumbnail picture of the Walther PP (Polizei Pistole)

1931
Walther PPK (Polizei Pistole Kriminalmodell)
The success of the earlier Walther PP line prompted the new, more compact Walther PPK to be introduced soon after.
Thumbnail picture of the Walther PPK (Polizei Pistole Kriminalmodell)

Washington Arms Pepperbox
The Washington Arms Pepperbox made use of six rotating barrels, each containing their own .31 cartridge.
Thumbnail picture of the Washington Arms Pepperbox

1836
Waters Model 1836
The Model 1836 arrived at the tail-end of the flintlock-era, soon to be replaced in history by the percussion cap.
Thumbnail picture of the Waters Model 1836

1872
Webley Bull Dog
The Webley Bull Dog Pocket Revolver proved popular with civilians living out on the wild frontiers of the late 1800s.
Thumbnail picture of the Webley Bull Dog

1887
Webley Model 1887
The long-running Webley Service Revolver series began in 1887 and saw consistent service into the Cold War years.
Thumbnail picture of the Webley Model 1887

1939
Welrod (Assassin's Pistol)
The Welrod appeared in World War 2 for use by special forces and resistance elements.
Thumbnail picture of the Welrod (Assassin's Pistol)

1861
Whitney Model 1861 Navy
One of the first efficient solid-framed revolvers of the period was the Whitney Navy percussion revolver.
Thumbnail picture of the Whitney Model 1861 Navy

1987
Zastava M88
Like other Zastava Arms products, the M88 is a locally-produced copy of a Soviet-era product.
Thumbnail picture of the Zastava M88

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