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Military Factory

Guns 1800 - 1899

Last Updated: 5/26/2015

The Industrial Revolution begat all new manufacture processes concerning gunsmithing and cartridge ammunition, changing battlefield tactics of the wars to follow.


The 1800s saw a bevy of firearms advancements appear - the Percussion Cap, catridged ammunition, smokeless powder - and many wars to prove these developments sound. In time, the repeating, breech-loaded firearm would prevail over the single-shot, muzzle-loading types of old and the battlefields would never be the same with the advent, and proper tactical use, of the machine gun. Many turn-of-the-century small arms would remain in play at the time of World War 1 in 1914 with many world powers scurrying to modernize in the face of total war - though some still left fighting with weapons of a bygone century.


There are a total of (107) Firearms from 1800 to 1899 in the Military Factory. Entries are listed below by alphanumeric order descending. Flag images indicative of country of origin.




1848
Allen & Thurber Single-Shot
This Allen & Thurber design was a peculiar-looking single-shot pistol intended for competition.
Thumbnail picture of the Allen & Thurber Single-Shot

1860
Allen & Wheelock Drop Breech
Production of the Allen & Wheelock drop breech rifle spanned from 1860 to 1871
Thumbnail picture of the Allen & Wheelock Drop Breech

1801
Baker Rifle (Baker Infantry Rifle)
The Baker Rifle became the first of many standardized long guns in service to the British Crown when adopted in 1800.
Thumbnail picture of the Baker Rifle (Baker Infantry Rifle)

1890
Berthier Rifle (Series)
The Berthier Rifle line saw an amazing service run from 1890 to the 1960s with over 2 million guns produced.
Thumbnail picture of the Berthier Rifle (Series)

1861
Bridesburg Model 1861
The Bridesburg Model 1861 reached 5,000 production examples per month during its peak for the US government.
Thumbnail picture of the Bridesburg Model 1861

1863
Bridesburg Model 1863
The Bridesburg Model 1863 was essentially the Bridesburg Model 1861 with some minor improvements.
Thumbnail picture of the Bridesburg Model 1863

1856
Burnside Carbine
The Burnside Carbine found its way onto many battlefields of the Civil War, utilizing a special .54 caliber cartridge designed specifically for the weapon itself.
Thumbnail picture of the Burnside Carbine

1892
Carcano Modello 1891 (M91)
The Carcano Modello 1891 service rifle was in constant production from 1892 to 1945 and saw service in both World Wars.
Thumbnail picture of the Carcano Modello 1891 (M91)

1895
Colt Browning M1895 (Potato Digger)
The Colt-Browning M1895 - the Potato Digger - mated the movement of a lever-action rifle with gas-operated power to produce a new type of air-cooled machine gun.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Browning M1895 (Potato Digger)

1848
Colt Model 1848 (Baby Dragoon)
The Model 1848 Baby Dragoon was intended for the civilian market as a lighter-weight, more compact form of the full-sized military-minded Dragoon model of 1948.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1848 (Baby Dragoon)

1848
Colt Model 1848 (Dragoon)
Production of the Colt Model 1848 Dragoon lasted from 1848 to 1860 and these weapons saw use in the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1848 (Dragoon)

1849
Colt Model 1849 Pocket Revolver
The Colt Model 1849 Pocket Revolver succeeded the Baby Dragoon series and was produced to the tune of some 336,000 examples.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1849 Pocket Revolver

1851
Colt Model 1851 Navy
The Colt 1851 Navy revolver became one of the most popular handguns ever produced, seeing totals reach some 250,000 examples by 1873.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1851 Navy

1855
Colt Model 1855 (Root Revolver)
The Colt Model 1855 - otherwise known as the Root Revolver - was the first Colt revolver to feature a solid frame design.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1855 (Root Revolver)

1855
Colt Model 1855 Revolving Carbine
The United States government purchased over 4,400 Colt Model 1855 revolving carbine rifles during the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1855 Revolving Carbine

1860
Colt Model 1860 New Army
The Colt New Army Model 1860 revolver was produced in the hundreds of thousands during the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1860 New Army

1861
Colt Model 1861 Navy
Some 39,000 examples of the Colt 1861 Navy revolver were produced.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1861 Navy

1862
Colt Model 1862 Pocket Navy
The Colt Model 1861 Pocket Navy was more or less a smaller version of the successful Model 1851 Navy sold a decade prior.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1862 Pocket Navy

1862
Colt Model 1862 Police
28,000 Colt Model 1862 Police revolvers were produced in the span of 1861 to 1873, many pressed into service during the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1862 Police

1898
Colt Model 1898 (New Service)
The Colt New Service existed under several notable guises and was produced to the tune of some 356,000 examples.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Model 1898 (New Service)

1873
Colt Single Action Army (Colt 45 / Peacemaker)
Concerning the American Wild West, the Colt Single Action Army revolver became the stuff of legend.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Single Action Army (Colt 45 / Peacemaker)

1861
Colt Special Model 1861
The Colt Special Model 1861 musket was nothing more than a retooled Springfield Model 1861 manufactured on Enfield machinery.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Special Model 1861

1847
Colt Walker
The massive and powerful Colt Walker was originally designated a pistol by the US Army Ordnance Department for its personnel had never come across a revolver before then.
Thumbnail picture of the Colt Walker

1860
Cook & Brother Carbine
The Cook & Brother Carbine of 1860 was one of the few Confederate firearms produced in the South.
Thumbnail picture of the Cook & Brother Carbine

1860
Cooper Pocket Double Action
The Cooper Pocket percussion revolver utilized a double-action method, unlike other single-action guns of the day
Thumbnail picture of the Cooper Pocket Double Action

1862
Cosmopolitan Carbine
The Cosmopolitan Carbine was the standard issue weapon of the Illinois 5th and 6th Cavalry Regiments in the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Cosmopolitan Carbine

1825
Deringer (Derringer Pocket Pistol)
Derringer - note double R - became the generic name for a class of concealable small pistols following the original Deringer-family designs.
Thumbnail picture of the Deringer (Derringer Pocket Pistol)

1842
Deringer Model 1842 Navy
The Deringer Model 1842 Navy percussion pistol became the first US government-purchased pistol to feature a percussion cap action and rifled barrel design.
Thumbnail picture of the Deringer Model 1842 Navy

1850
Devisme Percussion Revolver
The Devisme percussion revolver was produced and decorated to the highest of standards.
Thumbnail picture of the Devisme Percussion Revolver

1862
Dickson Nelson & Co Rifle
The Dickson Nelson & Co Rifle was based on the flintlock Model 1814 long gun, modified to a percussion-based action during the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Dickson Nelson & Co Rifle

1880
Enfield Mk I / Mk II
The Enfield Mk series service revolvers saw short-lived use with British Army and Canadian North-West Mounted Police.
Thumbnail picture of the Enfield Mk I / Mk II

1853
Enfield Model 1853
The Enfield Pattern 1853 rifle musket fired the same ammunition as the .58 Springfield rifle musket.
Thumbnail picture of the Enfield Model 1853

1820
Francotte Pinfire
The well-made Francotte Pinfire revolver was designed by August Francotte out of Liege, Belgium.
Thumbnail picture of the Francotte Pinfire

1898
Gasser & Rast Model 1898
The Gasser & Rast Model 1898 revolver was accepted into service with the Austro-Hungarian Army.
Thumbnail picture of the Gasser & Rast Model 1898

1870
Gasser Model 1870 Army Service
The Model 1870 was the standard sidearm of Austro-Hungarian cavalry units.
Thumbnail picture of the Gasser Model 1870 Army Service

1861
Gatling Gun Model 1861
Ironically, Dr. Gatling originally designed his Gatling Gun for the purpose of reducing the size of modern armies and, in turn, reducing the number of battlefield deaths.
Thumbnail picture of the Gatling Gun Model 1861

1803
Harpers Ferry Model 1803
Harpers Ferry Model 1803 Rifle production reached nearly 20,000 units from 1803 to 1819.
Thumbnail picture of the Harpers Ferry Model 1803

1805
Harpers Ferry Model 1805
The Model 1805 became the first American pistol to be manufactured by a US military arsenal.
Thumbnail picture of the Harpers Ferry Model 1805

1816
Harpers Ferry Model 1816
The Harpers Ferry Model 1816 was the most-produced flintlock in American history - totals reaching 675,000.
Thumbnail picture of the Harpers Ferry Model 1816

1841
Harpers Ferry Model 1841 (Mississppi Rifle)
The Harpers Ferry Model 1841 Mississippi Rifle saw use beginning in the Seminole Wars and continuing on into the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Harpers Ferry Model 1841 (Mississppi Rifle)

1857
Harpers Ferry Model 1855
The Harpers Ferry Model 1855 rifle-musket was produced in nearly 60,000 examples from 1857 to 1861 before the armory equipment was lost to Confederate forces.
Thumbnail picture of the Harpers Ferry Model 1855

1813
Henry Model 1813 Navy
The Henry Model 1813 Navy pistol was known to be carried into battle by US Navy hero Oliver Hazard Perry during the War of 1812.
Thumbnail picture of the Henry Model 1813 Navy

1860
Henry Model 1860
Roughly 14,000 of the revolutionary Henry Rifles were produced from the 1850s up to 1866.
Thumbnail picture of the Henry Model 1860

1889
Infantry Model 1889 (Belgian Mauser)
The Model 1889 was nothing more than the proven German Mauser modified to suit Belgian Army needs.
Thumbnail picture of the Infantry Model 1889 (Belgian Mauser)

1860
J.F. Brown Target / Sniper Rifle
The J.F. Brown Target-Sniper Rifle design was a rather advanced design for its time and issued to highly-trained sharpshooters during the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the J.F. Brown Target / Sniper Rifle

1836
Johnson Model 1836
The Johnson Model 1836 was sold to the US government by way of contract for nine dollars a pistol.
Thumbnail picture of the Johnson Model 1836

1894
Krag-Jorgensen Model 1894
The Krag-Jorgensen repeat-fire bolt-action rifle was eventually adopted by Norway, the United States and Denmark as their standard army service rifle.
Thumbnail picture of the Krag-Jorgensen Model 1894

1887
Lebel Model 1886
The revolutionary Lebel 8mm bolt-action rifle served the French from 1887 to 1936, becoming the standard French infantry rifle of World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Lebel Model 1886

1888
Lee Metford (Magazine Lee Metford / MLM)
Despite a relatively short service life with the British Empire, the Lee-Metford was produced across several major variants.
Thumbnail picture of the Lee Metford (Magazine Lee Metford / MLM)

1895
Lee-Enfield (Series)
The fabulous Lee-Enfield rifle served the British Empire from 1895 through 1957.
Thumbnail picture of the Lee-Enfield (Series)

1823
Lefaucheux 20-Round
This Lefaucheux revolver tried to make use of twenty 7.65mm cartridges firing from a double-barrel arrangement.
Thumbnail picture of the Lefaucheux 20-Round

1854
Lefaucheux Model 1854
The Lefaucheux Model 1854 was featured in the American Civil War between the North and South.
Thumbnail picture of the Lefaucheux Model 1854

1861
LeMat (Grape Shot Revolver)
The twin-barrel, nine-shot LeMat service revolver achieved fame during the American Civil War - sporting a second barrel firing 16-gauge buckshot.
Thumbnail picture of the LeMat (Grape Shot Revolver)

1869
Liege Model 1869
The Liege Model 1869 pinfire revolver could accept an ungainly bayonet configuration slung underneath the barrel by way of a mounting lug.
Thumbnail picture of the Liege Model 1869

1860
Lindsay Model 1860
New York inventor John P. Lindsay developed his 1860 Twin-Shot pistol to provide for a psuedo-repeating firing action as a workaround for Colt revolver patents.
Thumbnail picture of the Lindsay Model 1860

1863
Lindsay Model 1863 U.S. Double Rifle
The Model 1863 Double was an attempt by J.P. Lindsay Mfg Co to provide a dual-shot design to a single-barrel rifle musket.
Thumbnail picture of the Lindsay Model 1863 U.S. Double Rifle

1854
Lorenz Model 1854 / Model 1862 (Lorenz Rifle)
The Lorenz Rifle rifled musket managed its way in several European conflicts and found use as the third most quantitative long gun of the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Lorenz Model 1854 / Model 1862 (Lorenz Rifle)

1859
Manhattan Navy
After Colt patents had expired, firms like the Manhattan Firearms Company copied successful Colt revolver designs such as the Navy.
Thumbnail picture of the Manhattan Navy

1886
Mannlicher Model 1886
The Mannlicher Model 1886 was, in effect, doomed by the arrival of the smokeless powder cartridge adopted by the French and their Lebel series.
Thumbnail picture of the Mannlicher Model 1886

1888
Mannlicher Model 1888
The Mannlicher Model 1888 was developed in response to the French adoption of the 8mm smokeless powder cartridge which made many existing service rifles obsolete.
Thumbnail picture of the Mannlicher Model 1888

1895
Mannlicher Model 1895
The Mannlicher Model 1895 was a refined form of the Model 1886 and survived both World War 1 and World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Mannlicher Model 1895

1873
MAS Modele 1873 / Modele 1874
The Modele 1873 became the first centerfire and Double-Action revolver to reach service with the French Army.
Thumbnail picture of the MAS Modele 1873 / Modele 1874

1892
MAS Modele D'ordonnance 1892 (8mm Lebel)
The Modele 1892 was designed as an all-new replacement for the Model 1873 and Model 1874 revolvers and fired a new smokeless cartridge.
Thumbnail picture of the MAS Modele D'ordonnance 1892 (8mm Lebel)

1896
Mauser C96
The Mauser C96 saw combat service through World War 1, World War 2, the Korean War and the Vietnam War among other conflicts.
Thumbnail picture of the Mauser C96

1888
Mauser Gewehr 88 (Gew 88 / Model 1888 Reichsgewehr)
The Mauser Gew 88 series of bolt-action service rifles were one of two such weapons stocked in the German inventory during World War 1, the other being the Gew 98.
Thumbnail picture of the Mauser Gewehr 88 (Gew 88 / Model 1888 Reichsgewehr)

1898
Mauser Gewehr 98 (Gew 98)
The Gewehr 98 was the standard German infantry rifle from 1898 up until 1935 and saw combat action from World War 1 into World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Mauser Gewehr 98 (Gew 98)

1872
Mauser Model 1871
The Mauser Model 1871 was the beginning of the Mauser bolt-action rifle legend.
Thumbnail picture of the Mauser Model 1871

1860
Maynard Carbine
Over 20,000 of the Maynard Carbine breech-loading guns were produced and these saw service in the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Maynard Carbine

1863
Merrill Model 1863 (Merrill Carbine)
The Merrill Carbine was a weapon serving both Union and Confederate cavalry forces during the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Merrill Model 1863 (Merrill Carbine)

1864
Metropolitan Navy Percussion
When the Colt East Armory was lost to fire during the American Civil War, Metropolitan Arms took to producing copies of the Colt Navy revolver.
Thumbnail picture of the Metropolitan Navy Percussion

1865
Miller Model 1861
The Miller Model 1861 was the Springfield Model 1861 Rifle-Musket converted from muzzle-loading to breech-loading using the patented Miller conversion block arrangement.
Thumbnail picture of the Miller Model 1861

1819
Model 1819 Hall Rifle
Despite its 1819 appearance, the Hall Rifle managed to see limited use in the American Civil War of the 1860s.
Thumbnail picture of the Model 1819 Hall Rifle

1866
Model 1866 Peabody Carbine
Though developed during the final fighting of the American Civil War, the Peabody Carbine saw more success overseas in the post-war years.
Thumbnail picture of the Model 1866 Peabody Carbine

1891
Model 1891 (Argentine Mauser)
The Model 1891 Argentine Mauser was the Model 1889 Belgian Mauser by way of the Model 1890 Turkish Mauser.
Thumbnail picture of the Model 1891 (Argentine Mauser)

1870
Modello 1870 Italian Vetterli
The Swiss-based Model 1870 Italian Vetterli began life as a single-shot rifle until the late-1870s when a repeat-fire function was added.
Thumbnail picture of the Modello 1870 Italian Vetterli

1891
Mosin-Nagant Model 1891
The Mosin-Nagant M1891 bolt-action rifle was developed by a Russian-Belgium design team and produced in over 37,000,000 examples.
Thumbnail picture of the Mosin-Nagant Model 1891

1895
Nagant Model 1895 (M1895)
Over 2 million copies of the famous Russian/Soviet Nagant Model of 1895 service revolver were eventually produced into 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Nagant Model 1895 (M1895)

1882
Ordnance Revolver Model 1882
The Model 1882 was designed around an all-new 7.5x23R cartridge, both developed by Lieutenant-Colonel Rudolf Schmidt.
Thumbnail picture of the Ordnance Revolver Model 1882

1865
Palmer Model 1865
Patented in 1863, the Palmer Model 1865 bolt-action carbine arrived too late to see action in the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Palmer Model 1865

1891
Pistola a Rotazione Modello 1889 (Bodeo)
The Model 1889 Bodeo revolver entered the Italian Army inventory in 1891 and continued service through to the end of World War 2 in 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Pistola a Rotazione Modello 1889 (Bodeo)

1879
Reichsrevolver Model 1879
The Model 1879 Reichsrevolver was born out of a German military modernization program.
Thumbnail picture of the Reichsrevolver Model 1879

1883
Reichsrevolver Model 1883 (Dreyse)
The Model 1883 Reichsrevolver was essentially the Model 1879 produced to a higher officer standard.
Thumbnail picture of the Reichsrevolver Model 1883 (Dreyse)

1850
Remington Model 1841 (Mississippi Rifle)
The Remington Model 1841 was the Remington take on the classic Model 1841 Mississippi Rifle originally produced by the Harpers Ferry arsenal.
Thumbnail picture of the Remington Model 1841 (Mississippi Rifle)

1861
Remington Model 1858 Army
The Remington Model 1858 proved hugely popular during the American Civil War for its inherent structural strength, firepower and reliability.
Thumbnail picture of the Remington Model 1858 Army

1861
Remington Model 1861 Army
The Remington Model 1861 proved as popular as the 1860 New Model Army Colt.
Thumbnail picture of the Remington Model 1861 Army

1862
Remington Model 1861 Navy
Roughly 7,000 of the Remington Model 1861 Navy revolver were produced, many seeing heavy action in the American Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Remington Model 1861 Navy

1875
Remington Model 1875 New Army
Despite the strong Remington revolver pedigree, the Model 1875 New Army could not compete with the popular Colt Peacemaker line.
Thumbnail picture of the Remington Model 1875 New Army

1890
Rifle Model 1890 (Turkish Mauser)
The Turkish Model 1890 service rifle was nothing more than the German Mauser Model 1887 by way of the Belgian Mauser Model 1889.
Thumbnail picture of the Rifle Model 1890 (Turkish Mauser)

1867
Sharps Model 1867 (Carbine)
Over 100,000 Sharps carbines and rifles were produced from the period running 1850 to 1881.
Thumbnail picture of the Sharps Model 1867 (Carbine)

1893
Skoda MG (series)
The Skoda Model 1909 water-cooled machine gun failed to mach the reliability of the competing Schwarzlose Model 1907 design for the Austro-Hungarian Army.
Thumbnail picture of the Skoda MG (series)

1869
Smith & Wesson Model 3
The Smith & Wesson Model 3 was given several useful qualities in its design including an ejector system which cleared all six chambers at once.
Thumbnail picture of the Smith & Wesson Model 3

1889
Smith & Wesson SW Model 10 (38 Special)
The .38 Special was - and continues to be - a no-frills and popular revolver entry despite its 1899 origins.
Thumbnail picture of the Smith & Wesson SW Model 10 (38 Special)

1860
Spencer Rifle / Carbine
The famous Spencer Rifle allowed a repeat-fire action by way of a lever and seven-round tube magazine.
Thumbnail picture of the Spencer Rifle / Carbine

1817
Springfield Model 1817
The Model 1817 emerged from the burgeoning Armory at Springfield, Massachusetts.
Thumbnail picture of the Springfield Model 1817

1861
Springfield Model 1861
The .58 Caliber Springfield musket was the first rifle to feature iron sights.
Thumbnail picture of the Springfield Model 1861

1858
Starr DA
The Starr Revolver saw limited service during the American Civil War in both Single- and Double-Action forms.
Thumbnail picture of the Starr DA

1836
Waters Model 1836
The Model 1836 arrived at the tail-end of the flintlock-era, soon to be replaced in history by the percussion cap.
Thumbnail picture of the Waters Model 1836

1872
Webley Bull Dog
The Webley Bull Dog Pocket Revolver proved popular with civilians living out on the wild frontiers of the late 1800s.
Thumbnail picture of the Webley Bull Dog

1887
Webley Model 1887
The long-running Webley Service Revolver series began in 1887 and saw consistent service into the Cold War years.
Thumbnail picture of the Webley Model 1887

1861
Whitney Model 1861 Navy
One of the first efficient solid-framed revolvers of the period was the Whitney Navy percussion revolver.
Thumbnail picture of the Whitney Model 1861 Navy

1857
Whitworth Rifle
The British hexagonal rifled Whitworth rifle-musket - rejected at home - found service with Confederate forces during the America Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Whitworth Rifle

1866
Winchester Model 1866
The Winchester Model 1866 was THE original Winchester lever-action rifle, addressing the limitations of the preceding Henry Rifle.
Thumbnail picture of the Winchester Model 1866

1873
Winchester Model 1873
The Winchester Model 1873 Rifle is oft-termed as the Gun That Won The West.
Thumbnail picture of the Winchester Model 1873

1876
Winchester Model 1876
The Winchester Model 1876 was brought along to fulfill the need for a rifle to fire a bevy of new and more powerful cartridges appearing on the scene.
Thumbnail picture of the Winchester Model 1876

1892
Winchester Model 1892
Over 1 million Winchester Model 1892 rifles were produced from 1892 to 1938.
Thumbnail picture of the Winchester Model 1892

1895
Winchester Model 1895 Lee (Navy Lee)
Its unique cam-action, coupled with reliability problems, ensured just 15,000 of the expected 100,000 Winchester Model 1895 Lee rifles were ever produced.
Thumbnail picture of the Winchester Model 1895 Lee (Navy Lee)

1897
Winchester Model 1897
The Winchester Model 1897 pump-action slide shotgun was a further refinement of the John Browning-designed Winchester Model 1893 slide-action series.
Thumbnail picture of the Winchester Model 1897

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