• HOME
  • 2018 Military Pay Scale
  • 2017 Military Pay Scale
  • Military Pay Charts
  • Military Ranks
  • Military Time
  • Military Alphabet Code
  • Aircraft
  • Infantry (Small Arms)
  • Land Systems
  • Special Forces
  • Navy Ships
  • World War 1 Weapons
  • World War 2 Weapons

  • USS Hornet (CV-8) Conventionally-Powered Aircraft Carrier


    The USS Hornet CV-8 became the last full-size American aircraft carrier to be lost to action in World War 2, this on October 27th, 1942.

     Updated: 5/30/2017; Authored By JR Potts, AUS 173d AB and Dan Alex; Content ¬©www.MilitaryFactory.com


    When launched, the USS Hornet (CV-8) became the seventh ship in United States naval history to carry the "Hornet" name. She formed the third aircraft carrier of the Yorktown-class group of the United States Navy. The USS Hornet shared the same honor with the USS Wasp which were named after the first two American naval warships to serve in the Continental Navy, forerunner to the United States Navy. CV-8 was first identified as "Hull Number 385" and constructed at the Newport News shipyard in Norfolk, Virginia, beginning in September of 1939 at a cost of $32 million. She was officially launched in 1940 and formally commissioned on October 20th, 1941, forty-two days before the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Her first commanding officer was Captain Marc Mitscher and most of her 2,200 crewmen were newly-minted graduates from naval boot camp with an average age of 18 - as such, very few personnel had any shipboard experience. The American carrier force was equally new and as many experienced personnel as possible were transferred from other American vessels.

    As launched, the USS Hornet showcased an appearance much like today's modern US naval carriers. The bulk of her topside was dominated by a large-spanning flight deck that was serviced by three hangar elevators with access to the aircraft decks below. Three hydraulic catapults were in use allowing for three aircraft to be launched simultaneously (two on the main deck and one at the hangar deck). The island superstructure was offset to the starboard side in the usual fashion, providing an unrestricted approach at both the bow and stern for incoming and outgoing aircraft. Her internals housed crew areas, mess halls, machinery shops and engine controls. Propulsion was served through 4 x Parsons geared steam turbines mated to 9 x Babcock and Wilcox boilers feeding 4 x shafts at the stern. This arrangement provided the carrier with a speed of 32.5 knots in ideal conditions and a range out to 12,500 nautical miles. She was crewed by 2,919 personnel during the peak of her wartime use.


    Images Gallery


    VIEW
    VIEW

    USS Hornet (CV-8) Technical Specifications


    Service Year: 1941
    Type: Conventionally-Powered Aircraft Carrier
    National Origin: United States
    Ship Class: Yorktown-class



    Structural (Crew Space, Dimensions and Weights)


    Complement (Crew): 2,919
    Length: 770 feet (234.70 meters)
    Beam (Width): 83.2 feet (25.36 meters)
    Draught (Height): 24.3 feet (7.41 meters)

    Surface Displacement: 20,000 tons

    Installed Power and Base Performance


    Engine(s): 9 x Babcock & Wilcox boilers with 4 x Parsons geared steam turbines developing 120,000 shaft horsepower to 4 x shafts.

    Surface Speed: 32.5 knots (37 mph)
    Operational Range: 12,513 nautical miles (14,400 miles, 23,175 km)

    Armament / Air Wing


    1941:
    8 x 5-inch (130mm)/38 caliber Dual Purpose cannons in single mountings.
    16 x 1.1-inch (28mm)/75 caliber anti-aircraft cannons in quad mountings.
    24 x .50-inch (13mm) anti-aircraft machine guns in single mountings.

    February 1942:
    8 x 5-inch (130mm)/38 caliber Dual Purpose cannons in single mountings.
    16 x 1.1-inch (28mm)/75 caliber anti-aircraft cannons in quad mountings.
    30 x 20mm Oerlikon anti-aircraft cannons in single mountings.

    July 1942:
    8 x 5-inch (130mm)/38 caliber Dual Purpose cannons in single mountings.
    20 x 1.1-inch (28mm)/75 caliber anti-aircraft cannons in quad mountings.
    32 x 20mm Oerlikon anti-aircraft cannons in single mountings.

    Aircraft: Approximately 90 aircraft of various makes and types including fighters, dive bombers and torpedo bombers.

    Global Operators


    United States

    Ships-in-Class (3)


    USS Yorktown (CV-5); USS Enterprise (CV-6); USS Hornet (CV-8)