Site Search
Military Factory

WW2 Tanks

Last Updated: 5/26/2015

World War 2 was witness to the largest tank battles in the history of armored warfare.


World War 2 (1939-1945) was the stage for some the largest armor confrontations in the history of warfare - the Battle of Hannut (May 1940), the Battle of Raseiniai (June 1941), the Battle of Brody (1941), the Second Battle of El Alamein (October-November 1942, the Battle of Prokhorovka, Operation Goodwood (1944). This sort of commitment on the ground compelled all sides of the fighting to push existing designs to their limits while addressing future concerns by developing all new solutions.


The war introduced such classic fighting vehicles as the Soviet T-34, the American M4 Sherman, the British Churchill, and the German Panzer line culminating with the "King Tiger". Even then there proved more contributions from world military powers like France, Japan, and Italy and other nations ultimately joined in by opting to produced local solutions as was the case with Australia, Canada, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Italy, Poland, and even neutral Sweden.


There are a total of (121) World War 2 Tanks in the Military Factory. Entries are listed below by alphanumeric order descending. Flag images indicative of country of origin.




1940
38M Toldi
Only 202 of the Hungarian 38M Toldi Light Tanks were produced and many saw failed action against Soviet T-34s in the latter war years.
Thumbnail picture of the 38M Toldi

1941
40M Turan I / 41M Turan II
The Hungarian Turan I Medium Tank held origins in the Czech Skoda T-21 Light Tank prototype.
Thumbnail picture of the 40M Turan I / 41M Turan II

1937
4TP (PZlnz 140)
While 480 4TP Light Tanks were ordered by the Polish government, the German conquest in 1939 terminated all hopes and left just a single prototype.
Thumbnail picture of the 4TP (PZlnz 140)

1936
7TP
The Polish 7TP Light Tank series put up a valiant defense against the invading German Army in the opening phases of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the 7TP

1936
AH-IV
The AH-IV Tankette was of Czech origins but saw operational service in foreign hands.
Thumbnail picture of the AH-IV

1938
AMC-35 (Automitrailleuse de Combat Renault modele 1935) / Renault ACG-1
The Renault AMC-35 Cavalry Tank served in limited numbers within the armies of Belgium, France and Nazi Germany.
Thumbnail picture of the AMC-35 (Automitrailleuse de Combat Renault modele 1935) / Renault ACG-1

1932
BT-2 (Bystrochodnij Tankov)
The BT-2 Fast Tank officially began the BT-series of Soviet light tanks concerning World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the BT-2 (Bystrochodnij Tankov)

1933
BT-5 (Bystrochodnij Tankov)
The BT-5 Fast Tank preceded the much-improved BT-7 series into Soviet Army service and both led directly to the excellent T-34 Medium Tank of WW2.
Thumbnail picture of the BT-5 (Bystrochodnij Tankov)

1934
BT-7 (Bystrochodnij Tankov)
The BT-7 proved highly mobile on the battlefield but was nonetheless lightly armored, leading to many losses after 1939.
Thumbnail picture of the BT-7 (Bystrochodnij Tankov)

1935
Carro Armato L3 (Series)
While the the L3 series clearly failed the Italians in the Spanish Civil War, little was done to improved or replace the type by World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Carro Armato L3 (Series)

1940
Carro Armato L6/40
Like most other Italian tanks of World War 2, the Carro Armato L6/40 was outdated by its contemporaries the moment it was introduced.
Thumbnail picture of the Carro Armato L6/40

1940
Carro Armato M11/39
Borrowing from the British Vickers 6-Ton tank, the Italians produced approximately 100 of their Carro Armato M11/39 Medium Tanks.
Thumbnail picture of the Carro Armato M11/39

1940
Carro Armato M13/40
The M13/40 was based on the Fiat M11/39 series and was directly influenced by the British Vickers 6-ton tank.
Thumbnail picture of the Carro Armato M13/40

1941
Carro Armato M14/41
Like other wartime Italian tank designs of World War 2, the M14/41 Medium Tank lacked much on the modern battlefield.
Thumbnail picture of the Carro Armato M14/41

1943
Carro Armato M15/42
The Carro Armato M15/42 served for a time with the Italian Army, most noted for its use in the defense of Rome against Nazi Germany.
Thumbnail picture of the Carro Armato M15/42

1940
Carro Armato P40 (Carro Pesante P40)
The Carro Armato P40 may have been one of the most impressive Italian war-time tanks on paper but reality limited the series in many respects.
Thumbnail picture of the Carro Armato P40 (Carro Pesante P40)

1938
Cruiser Tank Mk I (A9)
The Cruiser Tank Mk I became the first British combat tank to incorporate a centrally-positioned turret housing the primary armament.
Thumbnail picture of the Cruiser Tank Mk I (A9)

1940
Cruiser Tank Mk II (A10)
The Cruiser Tank Mk II was a short-lived British tank designed by Sir John Carden - only 175 examples were produced.
Thumbnail picture of the Cruiser Tank Mk II (A10)

1938
Cruiser Tank Mk III (A13 Mark I)
Limited to just 65 production examples, the Cruiser Tank Mk III and gave equally limited service in World War 2 actions.
Thumbnail picture of the Cruiser Tank Mk III (A13 Mark I)

1940
Cruiser Tank Mk IV (A13)
The British Cruiser Tank Mk IV operated for only a short time during World War 2 from 1940 to 1942.
Thumbnail picture of the Cruiser Tank Mk IV (A13)

1940
Cruiser Tank Mk V Covenanter (A13)
Like other cruiser tank designs for the British in World War 2, the Covenanter idea was lost to several poor design decisions.
Thumbnail picture of the Cruiser Tank Mk V Covenanter (A13)

1941
Cruiser Tank Mk VI Crusader (A15)
The Cruiser Tank Crusader proved itself a critical component to the early war effort of the British Army and its allies.
Thumbnail picture of the Cruiser Tank Mk VI Crusader (A15)

1942
Cruiser Tank Mk VII Cavalier (A24)
Intended to replace the aging Crusader series, the Cavalier Cruiser Tank suffered from the installation of an underpowered Liberty engine.
Thumbnail picture of the Cruiser Tank Mk VII Cavalier (A24)

1943
Cruiser Tank Mk VIII Challenger (A30)
The Challenger Mk VIII Cruiser was a design of well-intentions, though never fully living up to expectations.
Thumbnail picture of the Cruiser Tank Mk VIII Challenger (A30)

1941
Cruiser Tank Ram
The Cruiser Tank Ram series was an admirable Canadian tank design effort, seeing some 2,150 examples produced.
Thumbnail picture of the Cruiser Tank Ram

1942
Cruiser Tank Sentinel AC (Australian Cruiser)
The Sentinel tank was designed in direct response to the expected Japanese invasion of Australia.
Thumbnail picture of the Cruiser Tank Sentinel AC (Australian Cruiser)

1938
FCM 36 (Char leger Modele 1936 FCM)
The FCM 36 Infantry Tank of French design did little to stop the might of the German invasion in 1940, its defects never wholly ironed out.
Thumbnail picture of the FCM 36 (Char leger Modele 1936 FCM)

1921
FCM Char 2C
Development and mass production of the Char 2C was doomed after the Armistice following World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the FCM Char 2C

1940
FCM F1
None of the proposed French FCM F1 Super Heavy Tanks were completed before the Fall of France to Germany in 1940.
Thumbnail picture of the FCM F1

1923
FIAT 3000 (Carro d-assalto 3000 / L.5 Series)
The Fiat 3000 was the Italian version of the successful French-based Renault FT-17 light tank.
Thumbnail picture of the FIAT 3000 (Carro d-assalto 3000 / L.5 Series)

1943
Grizzly I Cruiser
The Grizzly I Cruiser was nothing more than a slightly modified M4 Sherman for Canada - though eventually limited in production due to the availability of the M4 Sherman proper.
Thumbnail picture of the Grizzly I Cruiser

1940
Half-Track Car M2 / M9
The M2 half-track proved just as important to the Allied cause as her German counterparts.
Thumbnail picture of the Half-Track Car M2 / M9

1941
Half-Track Personnel Carrier M3
The M3 half-track became synonymous with the American involvement in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Half-Track Personnel Carrier M3

1936
Hotchkiss H35
The Hotchkiss H35 light tank was developed to fight alongside infantry units.
Thumbnail picture of the Hotchkiss H35

1939
Hotchkiss H39
The Hotchkiss H39 Light Tank followed the H35 series with a stronger engine and larger hull design.
Thumbnail picture of the Hotchkiss H39

1945
Infantry Tank Churchill (A43) Black Prince
Only six prototypes of the Black Prince Infantry Tank were completed before focus shifted to the new Centurion Main Battle Tank.
Thumbnail picture of the Infantry Tank Churchill (A43) Black Prince

1938
Infantry Tank Mk I Matilda (A11)
The Matilda I Infantry Tank of World War 2 produced only 139 examples.
Thumbnail picture of the Infantry Tank Mk I Matilda (A11)

1937
Infantry Tank Mk II Matilda (A12)
At the onset of world war, there was no finer British tank in service than the Matilda II Infantry Tank
Thumbnail picture of the Infantry Tank Mk II Matilda (A12)

1940
Infantry Tank Mk III Valentine
The Valentine Infantry Tank was heavily utilized in a variety of battlefield functions.
Thumbnail picture of the Infantry Tank Mk III Valentine

1941
Infantry Tank Mk IV Churchill (A22)
Undoubtedly, the Churchill Infantry Tank proved to be the most important British tank of World War 2 and was produced in the thousands.
Thumbnail picture of the Infantry Tank Mk IV Churchill (A22)

1944
Infantry Tank Valiant (A38)
Intended for battle in the Far East, only one pilot vehicle of the Valiant was ever completed during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Infantry Tank Valiant (A38)

1943
IS-1 / JS-1 (Josef Stalin)
The IS-1 heavy tank were essentially upgraded KV-1 Heavy Tank models.
Thumbnail picture of the IS-1 / JS-1 (Josef Stalin)

1943
IS-2 / JS-2 (Josef Stalin)
The IS-2 heavy tank was rushed to the front lines as soon as the design was proven sound for the Red Army.
Thumbnail picture of the IS-2 / JS-2 (Josef Stalin)

1945
IS-3 / JS-3 (Josef Stalin)
As formidable as the IS-2 was, the Soviets raised the bar with the IS-3.
Thumbnail picture of the IS-3 / JS-3 (Josef Stalin)

1942
Krupp Landkreuzer P.1000 Ratte (Rat)
If it was ever completed, the Landkreuzer P.1000 Ratte would have been the largest tank ever produced.
Thumbnail picture of the Krupp Landkreuzer P.1000 Ratte (Rat)

1939
KV-1 (Klimenti Voroshilov)
At one time, the Soviet KV-1 Heavy Tank was identified as the most powerful tank in the world.
Thumbnail picture of the KV-1 (Klimenti Voroshilov)

1940
KV-2 (Klimenti Voroshilov)
The sheer size and lack of mobility of the KV-2 made its production life short and forgettable.
Thumbnail picture of the KV-2 (Klimenti Voroshilov)

1943
KV-85 (Klimenti Voroshilov)
The KV-85 was a stopgap heavy tank solution to counter the new German Panther series.
Thumbnail picture of the KV-85 (Klimenti Voroshilov)

1941
Landing Vehicle Tracked (LVT-2 / LVT-4) (Alligator / Water Buffalo)
LVTs served the US Marines well in their island-hopping campaigns across the Pacific Ocean in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Landing Vehicle Tracked (LVT-2 / LVT-4) (Alligator / Water Buffalo)

1936
LT vz 35 / PzKpfW 35(t)
Initially plagued with issues, the Czech LT vz 35 light tank became a reliable performer - for the German Army.
Thumbnail picture of the LT vz 35 / PzKpfW 35(t)

1939
LT vz 38 / PzKpfW 38(t) (SdKfz 140)
Though originally intended for Czech Army use, the German occupation negated such use and the LT vz 38 was pressed into service for its new owners.
Thumbnail picture of the LT vz 38 / PzKpfW 38(t) (SdKfz 140)

1933
M1 (Light Tank, M1 / M1 Combat Car)
The M1 Combat Car preceded the M2 Light Tank line for the American Army and saw a short-lived career from 1937 to 1943.
Thumbnail picture of the M1 (Light Tank, M1 / M1 Combat Car)

1935
M2 (Light Tank, M2)
The American M2 Light Tank preceded the much more well-known World War 2-era M3/M5 Stuart Light Tank for the US Army.
Thumbnail picture of the M2 (Light Tank, M2)

1943
M22 Locust
The M22 Locust was a light tank designed to be air-dropped to assist in airborne operations.
Thumbnail picture of the M22 Locust

1944
M24 Chaffee (Light Tank, M24)
The American M24 Chaffee Light Tank appeared during the latter stages of World War 2 and saw considerable service in the Korean War that followed.
Thumbnail picture of the M24 Chaffee (Light Tank, M24)

1945
M26 Pershing
The M26 Pershing was developed to counter the Panzer scourge in WW2 but arrived too late in the war to be of much tactical use.
Thumbnail picture of the M26 Pershing

1942
M3 Lee / M3 Grant (Medium Tank, M3)
The Medium Tank M3 was an interim design at best, generally inferior to battle tanks appearing from 1943 and onwards.
Thumbnail picture of the M3 Lee / M3 Grant (Medium Tank, M3)

1941
M3 Stuart (Light Tank, M3)
The compact M3 Stuart Light Tank proved her worth in the early going of World War 2 but was quickly outclassed by enemy types in short order.
Thumbnail picture of the M3 Stuart (Light Tank, M3)

1942
M4 Sherman (Medium Tank, M4)
The M4 Sherman was the backbone of the World War Two Allied armor offensive and went on to see action in the Korean War.
Thumbnail picture of the M4 Sherman (Medium Tank, M4)

1942
M5 Stuart (Light Tank, M5) (Stuart VI)
The M5 Light Tank was a successful improvement over the original M3 Stuart Light Tank series of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the M5 Stuart (Light Tank, M5) (Stuart VI)

1940
M6 (Heavy Tank M6)
The American M6 Heavy Tank was outdated from the outset of World War 2, resulting in a production total of just forty vehicles which never saw combat.
Thumbnail picture of the M6 (Heavy Tank M6)

1940
Marmon-Herrington (South African Reconnaissance Vehicle)
The Marmon-Herrington Armored Car of 1940 was adopted by several Allied participants of World War 2 - the line also saw service thereafter.
Thumbnail picture of the Marmon-Herrington (South African Reconnaissance Vehicle)

1940
Medium Tank M2
Unfortunately for the Americans, the M2 Medium Tank was obsolete as soon as it arrived.
Thumbnail picture of the Medium Tank M2

1944
Medium Tank T20
The abandoned T20 Medium Tank was envisioned as a possible successor to the famous M4 Sherman Medium Tank line for the Americans.
Thumbnail picture of the Medium Tank T20

1945
Panzerkampfwagen E-100 (Tiger Maus)
The first prototype of the Tiger Maus was only half-complete when the Allies overtook her development facility.
Thumbnail picture of the Panzerkampfwagen E-100 (Tiger Maus)

1934
Panzerkampfwagen Neubaufahrzeug (PzKpfW NbFz V / VI)
The prewar German Neubaufahrzeug was a short-lived heavy tank program netting just five vehicles.
Thumbnail picture of the Panzerkampfwagen Neubaufahrzeug (PzKpfW NbFz V / VI)

1936
Renault Char B1
405 total Char B1 Heavy Tanks were produced for the French Army before and during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Renault Char B1

1931
Renault Char D1
In the post-war years, the Char D1 was the most modern tank in France but could do very little during the time of the German invasion.
Thumbnail picture of the Renault Char D1

1936
Renault R35 (Char leger Modele 1935 R)
Intended as a successor to the famous French FT-17 Light Tank, the Renault R35 actually played a greater role in German plans following the Fall of France in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Renault R35 (Char leger Modele 1935 R)

1935
SdKfz 101 Panzerkampfwagen I (PzKpfW I) / Panzer 1
The Panzer I began the long illustrious line of successful fast-moving tanks common with the German blitzkrieg.
Thumbnail picture of the SdKfz 101 Panzerkampfwagen I (PzKpfW I) / Panzer 1

1936
SdKfz 121 Panzerkampfwagen II (PzKpfW II) / Panzer 2
The Panzer II was an interim light tank design meant to hold ground until production of the Panzer III and Panzer IV medium tanks.
Thumbnail picture of the SdKfz 121 Panzerkampfwagen II (PzKpfW II) / Panzer 2

1939
SdKfz 141 Panzerkampfwagen III (PzKpfW III) / Panzer 3
The effective German Army Panzer III Medium Tank was developed substantially during the war years from 1939 to 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the SdKfz 141 Panzerkampfwagen III (PzKpfW III) / Panzer 3

1939
SdKfz 161 Panzerkampfwagen IV (PzKpfW IV) / Panzer 4
The Panzer IV medium tank remained in production for the German Army throughout the entire war.
Thumbnail picture of the SdKfz 161 Panzerkampfwagen IV (PzKpfW IV) / Panzer 4

1943
SdKfz 171 Panzerkampfwagen V Panther (PzKpfW V) / Panzer 5
The Panther ultimately became the best German tank in service during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the SdKfz 171 Panzerkampfwagen V Panther (PzKpfW V) / Panzer 5

1942
SdKfz 181 Panzerkampfwagen VI Tiger I (PzKpfW VI) / Panzer 6)
The PzKpfW VI Tiger heavy tank saw combat action on all fronts in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the SdKfz 181 Panzerkampfwagen VI Tiger I (PzKpfW VI) / Panzer 6)

1944
SdKfz 182 Panzerkampfwagen VIB Tiger II / King Tiger (PzKpfw VIB) / Panzer 6B
The Tiger II was the definitive battlefield presence and the pinnacle of German Panzer tank design by the end of the war.
Thumbnail picture of the SdKfz 182 Panzerkampfwagen VIB Tiger II / King Tiger (PzKpfw VIB) / Panzer 6B

1943
SdKfz 205 Panzerkampfwagen VIII (PzKpfW VIII) / Maus
For its time, the Panzerkampfwagen VIII Maus was the heaviest tank prototype to see completion during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the SdKfz 205 Panzerkampfwagen VIII (PzKpfW VIII) / Maus

1944
Sherman DD (Duplex Drive)
The Sherman DD became one of the more recognizable M4 Sherman Medium Tank offshoots seen during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Sherman DD (Duplex Drive)

1944
Sherman Jumbo (Medium Tank, M4A3E2)
The Sherman Jumbo was an upgunned and uparmored version of the war-winning base M4 Sherman medium tank.
Thumbnail picture of the Sherman Jumbo (Medium Tank, M4A3E2)

1944
Sherman VC Firefly (Medium Tank, M4A4)
The Sherman Firefly became one of the more important Sherman variants, the first to sport an effective Panzer-killing 76mm main gun.
Thumbnail picture of the Sherman VC Firefly (Medium Tank, M4A4)

1936
SOMUA S35
Despite some inherent weaknesses, the SOMUA S35 was in fact an excellent French tank of the 1930s.
Thumbnail picture of the SOMUA S35

1934
Stridsvagn L-60 (Strv L-60)
The Strv L-60 was an indigenous light tank design intended to make all current and future Swedish military products in-house endeavors.
Thumbnail picture of the Stridsvagn L-60 (Strv L-60)

1932
Stridsvagn m/31 (Strv m/31) / Landsverk L-10
Interestingly, development of the indigenous Swedish m/31 tank was made possible with German backing.
Thumbnail picture of the Stridsvagn m/31 (Strv m/31) / Landsverk L-10

1938
Stridsvagn m/38 (Strv m/38)
The Strv m/38 Light Tank was essentially a refined version of the capable L-60 of 1935.
Thumbnail picture of the Stridsvagn m/38 (Strv m/38)

1940
Stridsvagn m/39 (Strv m/39)
The Stridsvagn m/39 was a Swedish Army response to the very real threat of a Nazi invasion from the West.
Thumbnail picture of the Stridsvagn m/39 (Strv m/39)

1941
Stridsvagn m/40 (Strv m/40)
The Stridsvagn Strv m/40 light tank became the first Swedish-designed combat tank to see quantitative production - this during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Stridsvagn m/40 (Strv m/40)

1943
Stridsvagn m/42 (Strv m/42)
The Strv m/42 was the culmination of Swedish tank work begun in the 1920s and evolved throughout World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Stridsvagn m/42 (Strv m/42)

1944
T14 (Assault Tank T14)
The T14 Heavy Assault Tank was an ultimately abandoned joint endeavor between the United States and Great Britain during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the T14 (Assault Tank T14)

1931
T-26
The T-26 began as a direct copy of the British Vickers 6-ton Type E light tank.
Thumbnail picture of the T-26

1933
T-28
The T-28 medium tank was a promising design early on but, by the time of the Winter War with Finland, had proven wholly inadequate.
Thumbnail picture of the T-28

1945
T28 Super Heavy Tank (Gun Motor Carriage T95)
The T28 Super Heavy Tank existed in only two prototype forms and never saw combat service.
Thumbnail picture of the T28 Super Heavy Tank (Gun Motor Carriage T95)

1944
T29 (Heavy Tank T29)
The T29 was an experimental American turreted heavy tank developed in the closing months of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the T29 (Heavy Tank T29)

1945
T30 (Heavy Tank T30)
The T30 was another later-war American heavy tank development that would not see the light of day.
Thumbnail picture of the T30 (Heavy Tank T30)

1940
T-34
No tank affected the outcome of World War 2 as much as the production of the Soviet T-34 series.
Thumbnail picture of the T-34

1943
T-34/85
The T-34/85 is nothing more than an up-gunned version of the base T-34 medium tank design of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the T-34/85

1935
T-35
Impressive when it debuted in 1935, the T-35 suffered from its immense size and mechanical issues by 1939.
Thumbnail picture of the T-35

1933
T-37A
Influenced by the British Carden-Loyd tankettes, the T-37A was a Soviet design with amphibious qualities.
Thumbnail picture of the T-37A

1937
T-38
Despite it being outclassed on the battlefields of World War 2, the T-38 series served up until 1943.
Thumbnail picture of the T-38

1941
T-40
Losses of T-40 Amphibious Light Tanks were high during the initial German invasion of the Soviet Union during Operation Barbarossa.
Thumbnail picture of the T-40

1944
T-44
The T-44 appeared during World War 2 as a successor to the T-34 - though it arrived too late to see combat and never lived up to expectations.
Thumbnail picture of the T-44

1941
T-60
The T-60 light tank was design as an easy-to-produce measure for the Red Army after it had suffered heavy losses at the hands of the German Army.
Thumbnail picture of the T-60

1942
T-70
The T-70 was an up-gunned and improved form of the preceding T-60, seeing production reach over 8,200 units by the end of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the T-70

1919
Tank Mark VIII (International / Liberty)
The Mark VIII was the first tank produced through an international collaboration - this being the United States and Britain.
Thumbnail picture of the Tank Mark VIII (International / Liberty)

1944
Tank, Heavy Assault, Tortoise (A39)
Along with the Germans, Soviets and Americans, the British also developed their own super heavy tank in the A39 Tortoise.
Thumbnail picture of the Tank, Heavy Assault, Tortoise (A39)

1940
Tank, Heavy, TOG 1
Amidst fears of a renewed trench war in France, the British TOG 1 Super Heavy Tank was developed.
Thumbnail picture of the Tank, Heavy, TOG 1

1940
Tank, Heavy, TOG 2
Like the TOG 1 before it, development of the TOG 2 Super Heavy Tank coincided with the growing fear of renewed trench warfare in France.
Thumbnail picture of the Tank, Heavy, TOG 2

1941
Type 1 Chi-He
The Type 1 Chi-He took over the reigns from the Type 97 Chi-Ha for the Imperial Japanese Army.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 1 Chi-He

1945
Type 120 O-I
The Type 120 O-I Super Heavy Tank may have only existed on paper, though one example is believed to have made its way to Manchuria.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 120 O-I

1942
Type 2 Ka-Mi
The Type 2 Ka-Mi was an amphibious tank developed for strategic use in the Pacific island-hopping campaigns of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 2 Ka-Mi

1944
Type 3 Chi-Nu
The interim Type 3 Chi-Nu Medium Tank of the IJA was based on the obsolete Type 97 Chi-Ha and failed to make an impression.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 3 Chi-Nu

1945
Type 4 Chi-To
Only two prototypes of the Type 4 medium tank were completed before the end of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 4 Chi-To

1945
Type 5 Chi-Ri
Only a single unfinished Type 5 prototype was available to Japanese forces by the end of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 5 Chi-Ri

1931
Type 89 Chi-Ro
The Type 89 Chi-Ro served the Imperial Japanese Army from 1932 to 1942 before being replaced.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 89 Chi-Ro

1932
Type 92 Jyu-Sokosha
The Type 92 Jyu-Sokosha was classified by the Japanese Army as an armored car though it was more akin to a light tank - or tankette.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 92 Jyu-Sokosha

1936
Type 95 Ha-Go (Ke-Go / Kyu-Go)
At its inception, the Type 95 Ha-Go was the best Japan light tank offering, less so by the time of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 95 Ha-Go (Ke-Go / Kyu-Go)

1937
Type 97 Chi-Ha
The Type 97 Chi-Ha was regarded as the best Japanese tank of World War Two, despite its offensive shortcomings.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 97 Chi-Ha

1942
Type 97 Shinhoto Chi-Ha
A vastly improved version of the original Type 97 Chi-Ha, the Type 97 Shinhoto Chi-Ha became the best quantitatively-available Japanese tank of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 97 Shinhoto Chi-Ha

1937
Type 97 Te-Ke
The Type 97 suffered from being undergunned and had very little armor protection to speak of.
Thumbnail picture of the Type 97 Te-Ke

1928
Vickers 6-Ton (Mark E)
The Vickers Mark E was rejected by the British Army as a frontline implement but nevertheless found success on the export market.
Thumbnail picture of the Vickers 6-Ton (Mark E)

1936
Vickers Mk VI (Light Tank Mk VI)
Despite their size, the Mk VI family served a critical purpose in the British Army during the early going of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Vickers Mk VI (Light Tank Mk VI)

1938
Vickers Mk VII (A17) (Tetrarch)
The compact Vickers Tetrarch Light Tank proved greater than its perceived size - finding usefulness with British airborne forces in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Vickers Mk VII (A17) (Tetrarch)

MORE TANKS, VEHICLES, & ARTILLERY: [ SHOW / HIDE ]