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WW2 Aircraft

Last Updated: 5/12/2015

Covering some total six years of fighting, various aircraft types were unleashed on the world stage during World War 2.


Compared to World War 1 (1914-1918), World War 2 set the standard for aircraft combat by producing evermore powerful bombers, faster fighters and rocket- and jet-propelled airframes. The result was more tonnage in ordnance dropped, higher ace counts and an all-new era of powered, heavier-than-air flight. World War 2 utilized a combination of fighters, interceptors, reconnaissance, anti-ship, ground attack and specialized platforms to undertake a wide variety of missions over many parts of the world. Developments of the conflict ultimately set the groundwork for the Cold War to follow - including the first jet-versus-jet fights over the Korean peninsula.


There are a total of (452) World War 2 Aircraft in the Military Factory. Entries are listed below by alphanumeric order descending. Flag images indicative of country of origin.




1921
Aero A.11
The Aero A.11 was a multi-purpose airframe that saw no fewer than 20 variants produced during the interwar years.
Thumbnail picture of the Aero A.11

1937
Aero A.304
The militarized A.304 was developed from the Aero A.204, a proposed passenger airliner that found little market interest.
Thumbnail picture of the Aero A.304

1944
Aichi B7A Ryusei (Grace)
By the time the Aichi B7A series made it to operational status, Japan no longer had her aircraft carriers.
Thumbnail picture of the Aichi B7A Ryusei (Grace)

1940
Aichi D3A (Val)
Thought to be obsolescent at the beginning of World War 2, the D3A Val none-the-less made its presence known in the attack on Pearl Harbor.
Thumbnail picture of the Aichi D3A (Val)

1941
Aichi E13A (Jake)
The Aichi E13A Jake became the most important floatplane for the Japanese Navy in World War Two.
Thumbnail picture of the Aichi E13A (Jake)

1944
Aichi E16A Zuiun (Paul)
The Aichi E16A series was a great all-around floatplane, appearing too late in the war to achieve much use.
Thumbnail picture of the Aichi E16A Zuiun (Paul)

1945
Aichi M6A Seiran
The Aichi M6A-1 Seiran floatplane was to be housed and released from Japanese Navy I-400 class submarines.
Thumbnail picture of the Aichi M6A Seiran

1942
Airspeed Horsa
The Airspeed Horsa series of gliders proved ever-critical to the Allied advances during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Airspeed Horsa

1937
Airspeed Oxford
The Airspeed Oxford was a priceless trainer in use by British and Commonwealth forces throughout the Second World War.
Thumbnail picture of the Airspeed Oxford

1935
Amiot 143
The Amiot 143 was wholly inadequate by the time of the German invasions throughout Europe.
Thumbnail picture of the Amiot 143

1940
Amiot 354
The Amiot 354 proved itself a capable French-designed bomber - though it was also of little use in the defense of France.
Thumbnail picture of the Amiot 354

1933
ANF Les Mureaux (Series)
The ANF Les Mureaux formed the principle observation aircraft of French armed forces through the inter-war years leading up to World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the ANF Les Mureaux (Series)

1937
Arado Ar 195
The Arado Ar 195 never proceeded from the prototype stage, where only three such examples were produced.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar 195

1939
Arado Ar 196
The Arado Ar 196 reconnaissance floatplane could be found on nearly every front during the war.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar 196

1941
Arado Ar 232 Tausendfussler (Millipede)
When on the ground, the Arado Ar 232 was a highly identifiable transport aircraft, thanks to the multiple sets of wheels the system utilized.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar 232 Tausendfussler (Millipede)

1944
Arado Ar 234 (Blitz)
The German Arado Ar 234 Blitz became the first purpose-built, jet-powered bomber anywhere in the world.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar 234 (Blitz)

1940
Arado Ar 240
Designed as an all-around situational performer, the Arado Ar 240 was doomed by its poor flight characteristics.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar 240

1934
Arado Ar 68
By the time World War Two was in full swing in 1939, the Arado Ar 68 was relegated to pilot trainer.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar 68

1943
Arado Ar E.340
The cancelled, twin-boom Arado Ar E.340 was to replace the Junkers Ju 88 and Dornier Do 217s medium bombers in service with the German Luftwaffe during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.340

1944
Arado Ar E.381 (Kleinstjager)
The diminuitive Arado Ar E.381 was a parasite fighter prototype intended to be released into combat by an accompanying mothership.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.381 (Kleinstjager)

1936
Arado Ar E.500
A full-size mock-up of the E.500 was created before development stopped on the project altogether.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.500

1940
Arado Ar E.530
The Arado E.530 lost out to the Messerschmitt Zwilling series of similar design.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.530

1943
Arado Ar E.555
Development into the Arado Ar E.555 series was halted in December of 1944, no doubt due to the advance of the Allies.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.555

1945
Arado Ar E.560
The Arado E.560 would have been an impressive machine had it been completed and flown before the end of the war.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.560

1937
Arado Ar E.561
The Arado Ar E.561 was a complicated design best left to the imagination.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.561

1944
Arado Ar E.580
The Arado Ar E.580 single-seat jet-powered fighter unsuccessfully competed against the Heinkel He 162 Volksjager design.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.580

1944
Arado Ar E.581.4
The proposed E.581.4 featured a single turbojet engine with an split-intake mounted in the lower fuselage.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.581.4

1943
Arado Ar E.654 (Kampfzerstorer / Skorpion)
The E.654 received its Skorpion moniker from the distinctive design of its tail.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.654 (Kampfzerstorer / Skorpion)

1945
Arado Ar Projekt II
The proposed Projeckt II featured a crew of two in a pressurized cabin complete with ejection seats.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar Projekt II

1943
Arado Ar TEW 16/43-13
The TEW 13 series was to be powered by the volatile T-Stoff and C-Stoff rocket fuel combination.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar TEW 16/43-13

1943
Arado Ar TEW 16/43-15
The Arado Ar TEW 16/43-15 design was a combination jet- and rocket-powered fighter proposal for the German Luftwaffe.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar TEW 16/43-15

1943
Arado Ar TEW 16/43-19
The success of the Arado 234 and Messerschmitt 262 ended the pursuit of the Arado Ar TEW 16/43-19 multirole series.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar TEW 16/43-19

1943
Arado Ar TEW 16/43-23
The Arado TEW 16/43-23 saw its end when priority was given to the Ar 234 Blitz.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar TEW 16/43-23

1945
Arado NJ-1 Nacht Jager (Night Hunter)
The Arado NJ-1 Nacht Jager was a proposed nightfighter design featuring a three-man crew in a pressurized cockpit as well as extensive cannon armament.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado NJ-1 Nacht Jager (Night Hunter)

1941
Armstrong Whitworth Albemarle
The Armstrong Albemarle failed to impress as a bomber and, as such, was relegated to glider tug and transport service during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Armstrong Whitworth Albemarle

1936
Armstrong Whitworth Ensign
The impressive Armstrong Whitworth Ensign saw only limited production numbers but managed to serve both sides of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Armstrong Whitworth Ensign

1924
Armstrong Whitworth Siskin
The Armstrong Siskin biplane fighter enjoyed success between wars in service primarily with the United Kingdom and Canada.
Thumbnail picture of the Armstrong Whitworth Siskin

1937
Armstrong Whitworth Whitley
The ungainly Armstrong Whitley was nonetheless a workhorse performer for the Royal Air force during the span of 1937 to 1942.
Thumbnail picture of the Armstrong Whitworth Whitley

1940
Arsenal VG-33
Only about forty or so French Arsenal VG-33 fighters were completed before the Fall of France in 1940.
Thumbnail picture of the Arsenal VG-33

1934
Avia B.534
The oft-forgotten B.534 was at the pinnacle of biplane design in the 1930s.
Thumbnail picture of the Avia B.534

1933
Avro 621 Tutor
The Avro 621 Tutor became a mainstay trainer for various air powers of the world thanks to its Avro 504 lineage.
Thumbnail picture of the Avro 621 Tutor

1936
Avro Anson
The Avro Anson served a multitude of roles including coastal reconnaissance, crew trainer and communications platform.
Thumbnail picture of the Avro Anson

1942
Avro Lancaster
The Avro Lancaster was the definitive heavy bomber of the British cause during World War 2 - considered by many to be the best of the entire conflict.
Thumbnail picture of the Avro Lancaster

1940
Avro Manchester
The development of the Avro Manchester led directly to the development of the outstanding Avro Lancaster.
Thumbnail picture of the Avro Manchester

1945
Bachem Ba 349 Natter (Adder / Viper)
The Bachem Ba 349 Natter was designed to quickly respond to incoming Allied bomber formations and attack with high-explosive rockets.
Thumbnail picture of the Bachem Ba 349 Natter (Adder / Viper)

1942
Beech AT-10 Wichita
Nearly 2,400 Beechcraft AT-10 Wichita aircraft were built from 1942 to 1944 for the United States Army Air Forces of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Beech AT-10 Wichita

1941
Beechcraft C-45 (Expeditor)
The United States Army Air Corps took on the civilian-minded Beechcraft Model 18 as the C-45 in 1939.
Thumbnail picture of the Beechcraft C-45 (Expeditor)

1944
Beechcraft XA-38 Grizzly / Destroyer (Model 28)
The Beechcraft XA-38 Grizzly heavy fighter would have been a potent ground-attack component to the Allied cause of World War 2 had it been adopted.
Thumbnail picture of the Beechcraft XA-38 Grizzly / Destroyer (Model 28)

1941
Bell P-39 Airacobra
Though an American-originated fighter, the Bell P-39 Aircobra found greater success with the Soviets during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Bell P-39 Airacobra

1942
Bell P-59 Airacomet
The Bell P-59 Airacomet was not an outright success - though it helped to lay the foundation for American jet fighters that followed.
Thumbnail picture of the Bell P-59 Airacomet

1943
Bell P-63 Kingcobra
The American-originated Bell P-63 Kingcobra found more success abroad than at home - primarily in the hands of Soviet pilots during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Bell P-63 Kingcobra

1940
Bell XFL Airabonita
The Bell XFL-1 Airabonita was a failed attempt to convert the P-39 Airacobra into a viable US Navy interceptor.
Thumbnail picture of the Bell XFL Airabonita

1937
Bell XFM Airacuda
The Bell XFM Airacuda bomber destroyer became a failed design for the new company but set the stage for more promising ventures to follow.
Thumbnail picture of the Bell XFM Airacuda

1944
Bell XP-77
The Bell XP-77 fighter was to have relied on non-strategic materials in its construction - only two prototypes were built.
Thumbnail picture of the Bell XP-77

1945
Bell XP-83
The cancelled Bell XP-83 Escort Fighter was developed from the disappointing Bell P-59 Airacomet series.
Thumbnail picture of the Bell XP-83

1942
Berezniak-Isayev BI
The Berezniak-Isayev BI-1 rocket-powered interceptor failed to impress and was abandoned after seven pre-production aircraft were delivered.
Thumbnail picture of the Berezniak-Isayev BI

1935
Beriev Be-2 / MBR-2
Though hardly a heady performer, the Beriev Be-2 served a just cause in the maritime reconnaissance role for the Soviet Union in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Beriev Be-2 / MBR-2

1934
Blackburn Baffin
Fewer than 30 new-build Blackburn Baffins were produced, the rest being conversions of existing Blackburn Ripon biplanes to the improved Baffin standard.
Thumbnail picture of the Blackburn Baffin

1929
Blackburn Ripon
The Blackburn Ripon proved her worth as a British Fleet Air Arm torpedo bomber during the inter-war years and saw combat service with the Finnish Air Force in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Blackburn Ripon

1939
Bloch MB.150 (Series)
The French Bloch MB.150 series of fighter aircraft was limited by the German invasion - and subsequent German victory - in the summer of 1940.
Thumbnail picture of the Bloch MB.150 (Series)

1935
Bloch MB.210
The Bloch 210 series represented the first true modern bomber design of the French Air Force leading up to World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Bloch MB.210

1940
Blohm and Voss Bv 138
The Blohm und Voss Bv 138 was a pivotal floatplane in service with Germany, operating as a maritime reconnaissance aircraft.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv 138

1938
Blohm and Voss Bv 141
Despite its radical and unorthodox layout, the Blohm & Voss Bv 141 actually did fly and was produced in some 20 examples.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv 141

1944
Blohm and Voss Bv 155
Barely three of the Blohm and Voss Bv 155 day interceptors were realized at the time of the German surrender in May of 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv 155

1941
Blohm and Voss Bv 222 Wiking (Viking)
The Bv 222 was a mammoth machine by World War 2 standards, powered by no less than six 1,000 horsepower engines.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv 222 Wiking (Viking)

1944
Blohm and Voss Bv 238
At the time of its inception, the BV 238 floatplane was physically the largest aircraft ever to fly for Germany.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv 238

1943
Blohm and Voss Bv Ae 607
The Blohm and Voss Bv Ae 607 design study utilized a wholly radical design arrangement which included placement of the cockpit within the body of the aircraft and offset to portside.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv Ae 607

1942
Blohm and Voss Bv P.170
The Blohm and Voss P.170 bomber proposal utilized a very unique design configuration that included three engine nacelles along a single wing.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv P.170

1943
Blohm and Voss Bv P.192
The Blohm and Voss P.192 was a proposed replacement for the aging Junkers Ju 87 Stuka dive bomber series.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv P.192

1944
Blohm and Voss Bv P.194
The Blohm and Voss P.194 aircraft proposal of World War 2 joined many other ultimately abandoned aircraft initiatives by the company.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv P.194

1944
Blohm and Voss Bv P.208
The unorthodox, and ultimately abandoned, Blohm and Voss P.208 fighter project influenced the upcoming P.212 jet fighter submission.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv P.208

1945
Blohm and Voss Bv P.209.02
The Blohm and Voss P.209 02 fighter project made use of forward-swept wing mainplanes and a conventional tail unit.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv P.209.02

1945
Blohm and Voss Bv P.212
Another aircraft conceived through the German Emergency Fighter Program of World War 2 was the Blohm and Voss P.212 project.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv P.212

1939
Boeing 314 Clipper (C-98)
The Boeing Model 314 Clipper flying boat saw only 12 such examples produced in two variations.
Thumbnail picture of the Boeing 314 Clipper (C-98)

1937
Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress
The legendary Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress accounted for over 290,000 sorties with 640,000 tons of ordnance dropped during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress

1943
Boeing B-29 Superfortress
The Boeing B-29 Superfortress was the vehicle charged with dropping the two atomic bombs on Japan - helping to end the war in favor of the Allies.
Thumbnail picture of the Boeing B-29 Superfortress

1929
Boeing F4B / P-12
The F4B / P-12 pursuit fighter line became an important product for both Boeing and the United States military.
Thumbnail picture of the Boeing F4B / P-12

1932
Boeing P-26 Peashooter
The first all-metal aircraft design for the United States of America.
Thumbnail picture of the Boeing P-26 Peashooter

1937
Boeing XB-15 (XBLR-1 / Grandpappy)
First flying in 1937, the Boeing XB-15 became the largest American-constructed bomber to that point.
Thumbnail picture of the Boeing XB-15 (XBLR-1 / Grandpappy)

1944
Boeing XF8B
Boeing tried - unsuccessfully - to fit the long-range XF8B-1 prototype into long-term U.S. Navy plans.
Thumbnail picture of the Boeing XF8B

1941
Boeing-Stearman Kaydet
The Boeing-Stearman Kaydet trainer is now a much-loved collectors item for private aircraft owners.
Thumbnail picture of the Boeing-Stearman Kaydet

1939
Boulton Paul Defiant
The Boulton Paul Defiant became a useful defensive-minded night-fighter platform primarily over Britian during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Boulton Paul Defiant

1937
Breda Ba.64
The Breda Ba.64 saw only a few short years of service beginning in 1937 before being replaced in 1939 by the much-improved Ba.65.
Thumbnail picture of the Breda Ba.64

1936
Breda Ba.65
Experience in the Spanish Civil War forced the Breda Ba.65 to be used strictly in the attack role in World War 2 by the Italians.
Thumbnail picture of the Breda Ba.65

1938
Breda Ba.88 (Lince)
The Breda Ba.88 Lince arrived in pre-war Italy during 1938 and was quickly retired in 1941 once the fighting started.
Thumbnail picture of the Breda Ba.88 (Lince)

1939
Breguet Br.690
Like other useful combat aircraft for the French prior to the German invasion of World War 2, the Breguet 690 was primarily limited by low production figures.
Thumbnail picture of the Breguet Br.690

1937
Brewster F2A Buffalo
The F2A Buffalo fought valiantly in the first Battle of Midway, where losses were heavy.
Thumbnail picture of the Brewster F2A Buffalo

1941
Brewster SB2A Buccaneer
The Brewster SB2A Buccaneer scout bomber led a rather nondescript service life heading into World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Brewster SB2A Buccaneer

1943
Brewster XA-32
The Brewster XA-32 series was intended as a ground attack aircraft though only two prototypes were ever completed.
Thumbnail picture of the Brewster XA-32

1941
Brewster XSBA-1 / SBN-1
A protracted development period left the Brewster SBN-1 an obsolete machine when America went to war in December of 1941.
Thumbnail picture of the Brewster XSBA-1 / SBN-1

1940
Bristol Beaufighter
Amazingly the first production Bristol Beaufighter flew a mere twelve months after the prototype went airborne.
Thumbnail picture of the Bristol Beaufighter

1940
Bristol Beaufort
The Bristol-brand Beaufort served as the RAFs principle torpedo bomber from 1940-1943, then replaced by the more capable Beaufighter.
Thumbnail picture of the Bristol Beaufort

1935
Bristol Blenheim
The British Bristol Blenheim lost more aircrews than any other Royal Air Force aircraft in service during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Bristol Blenheim

1943
Bristol Buckingham
Developed to a medium bomber requirement, changes to British needs limited the Bristol Buckingham to fewer than 119 examples during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Bristol Buckingham

1942
CAC Boomerang
The Commonwealth Boomerang was a respectable fighter design emerging from Australia and fielded in response to the impending Japanese invasion of the Australian mainland.
Thumbnail picture of the CAC Boomerang

1941
CAC Wackett
The CAC Wackett trainer became the first aircraft design of the Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation of Australia.
Thumbnail picture of the CAC Wackett

1939
CAC Wirraway
The CAC Wirraway was an indigenous Australian development of the North American NA-16 trainer platform.
Thumbnail picture of the CAC Wirraway

1941
CAC Woomera (A23)
The RAAF order for 105 CAC Woomera bombers was cancelled due to large surpluses of war goods incoming from Britain and the US by 1944.
Thumbnail picture of the CAC Woomera (A23)

1938
CANT Z.1007 Alcione (Kingfisher)
The CANT Z.1007 proved one of the better Italian tri-motor designs as a medium bomber during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the CANT Z.1007 Alcione (Kingfisher)

1936
CANT Z.501 Gabbiano (Gull)
The CANT Z.501 Gabbiano was a serviceable floatplane for Italian interests in World War 2, though hardly an offensive-minded weapon.
Thumbnail picture of the CANT Z.501 Gabbiano (Gull)

1936
CANT Z.506 Airone (Heron)
The Italian CANT Z.506 series of floatplane aircraft was one of the few mounts to manage a useful existence before and after World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the CANT Z.506 Airone (Heron)

1936
Caproni AP.1
Poor performance eventually led to the Caproni AP.1 being replaced within the Regia Aeronautica.
Thumbnail picture of the Caproni AP.1

1938
Caproni Ca.310 (Libeccio)
The Caproni Ca.310 never proved itself an adequate military aircraft and its limited service history and production totals reflected this.
Thumbnail picture of the Caproni Ca.310 (Libeccio)

1940
Caproni-Campini N1 (CC.2)
The Caproni-Campini N1 was anything but an advancement for jet-powered flight, often refered to as a technological dead end.
Thumbnail picture of the Caproni-Campini N1 (CC.2)

1941
Consolidated B-24 Liberator
The Consolidated B-24 Liberator heavy bomber was produced in greater numbers than any other American aircraft during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Consolidated B-24 Liberator

1945
Consolidated B-32 Dominator
The Consolidated B-32 Dominator was a fail-safe heavy bomber design requested by the U.S. air service in the case that the Boeing B-29 Superfortress was not yet ready to go.
Thumbnail picture of the Consolidated B-32 Dominator

1940
Consolidated PB2Y Coronado
With the PBY Catalina firmly entrenched but aging, the US Navy looked to the newer Coronado floatplane design to help carry the torch through World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Consolidated PB2Y Coronado

1943
Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer
The Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer was a further development of the USN PB4Y-1 anti-submarine aircraft, itself a modified B-24 Liberator.
Thumbnail picture of the Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer

1936
Consolidated PBY Catalina
The Consolidated PBY Catalina was one of the more important flying boats for the Allies during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Consolidated PBY Catalina

1944
Consolidated Vultee TBY Sea Wolf
Despite a USN order for 1,100 aircraft, just 180 of the Consolidated Vultee TBY Sea Wolf aircraft were realized.
Thumbnail picture of the Consolidated Vultee TBY Sea Wolf

1933
Curtiss A-12 (Shrike)
The Curtiss A-12 Shrike was never used in combat and led a short production life.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss A-12 (Shrike)

1935
Curtiss A-18 Shrike
Limited to thirteen total production examples, the Curtiss A-18 Shrike managed to serve some ten USAAC units.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss A-18 Shrike

1938
Curtiss P-36 Hawk (Hawk 75 / Mohawk)
The Curtiss P-36 Hawk was operated in number before and during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss P-36 Hawk (Hawk 75 / Mohawk)

1941
Curtiss P-40 Warhawk
The Curtiss P-40 Warhawk fighter was used to good effect by Allied pilots during the early stages of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk

1943
Curtiss SB2C Helldiver
Though initially not as well-liked by her crews as the Douglas Dauntless was, the Curtiss Helldiver went on to sink more ship tonnage than any other aircraft in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss SB2C Helldiver

1938
Curtiss SBC Helldiver
The Curtiss SBC Helldiver became the US Navy's last acquired biplane when it was introduced in 1938.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss SBC Helldiver

1944
Curtiss SC Seahawk
Despite her floatplane pedigree, the Curtiss SC Seahawk displayed fighter-like performance.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss SC Seahawk

1942
Curtiss SO3C Seamew
The Curtiss SO3C Seamew suffered from a variety of setbacks, ultimately forcing the type out of service after just a few short years.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss SO3C Seamew

1935
Curtiss SOC Seagull
By 1940, the Curtiss SOC Seagull series could be found on just about every American warship in the Pacific.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss SOC Seagull

1944
Curtiss XF14C
The Curtiss XF14C carrier-based fighter existed in only one prototype form before seeing cancellation in 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss XF14C

1939
Curtiss XP-42
The Curtiss XP-42 was a further development of the P-36 product, though it lost out to the XP-40 after competition trials.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss XP-42

1941
Curtiss XP-46
The XP-46 would be doomed from the start, effectively dooming the Curtiss company itself.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss XP-46

1941
Curtiss XP-60
The Curtiss XP-60 was evolved multiple times but never materialized as a serious USAAF fighter contender during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss XP-60

1943
Curtiss XP-62
The Curtiss XP-62 was cancelled as quickly as it achieved a first flight in prototype form - all during 1943.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss XP-62

1942
Curtiss-Wright C-46 Commando
The often overshadowed Curtiss C-46 Commando superseded the Douglas DC-3 transports.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss-Wright C-46 Commando

1939
Curtiss-Wright CW-21 Demon
Developed for export, the Curtiss-Wright CW-21 Demon held many faults in its attempt to stay a lightweight interceptor.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss-Wright CW-21 Demon

1943
Curtiss-Wright XP-55 Ascender
The XP-55 was a novel attempt at a pusher-prop aircraft design, though hampered by less-then-stellar performance.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss-Wright XP-55 Ascender

1943
Curtiss-Wright XP-71
The Curtiss XP-71 was developed along the lines of a heavy fighter with solely cannon armament - though the need for such a type was over by the end of 1943.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss-Wright XP-71

1932
de Havilland DH.82 Tiger Moth
For its time, there was no more a trusted basic trainer than the storied de Havilland DH.82 Tiger Moth biplane.
Thumbnail picture of the de Havilland DH.82 Tiger Moth

1938
de Havilland DH.91 Albatross
Including its two prototypes, only seven total DH.91 Albatross aircraft were ever built by de Havilland.
Thumbnail picture of the de Havilland DH.91 Albatross

1942
de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito
The classic British de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito night fighter found few challengers during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito

1936
Dewoitine D.500
The D.500 series was a stopgap design, incorporating elements from two ages of aviation.
Thumbnail picture of the Dewoitine D.500

1939
Dewoitine D.520
The Dewoitine D.520 was the best French fighter available at the time of the Fall of France, just not available in any worthwhile numbers.
Thumbnail picture of the Dewoitine D.520

1938
DFS 230
The DFS 230 was the principle assault glider of the German Army in the early stages of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the DFS 230

1937
Dornier Do 17 (Flying Pencil)
The German Dornier Do 17 bomber was initially an impressive aircraft design of the late 1930s, eventually losing headway by the early 1940s to improved Allied fighters.
Thumbnail picture of the Dornier Do 17 (Flying Pencil)

1938
Dornier Do 18
The Dornier Do 18 was an outdated flying boat design for Germany at the start of World War 2 but managed several distance records for its time aloft.
Thumbnail picture of the Dornier Do 18

1939
Dornier Do 215
The Dornier Do 215 was originally a German product intended for export - the arrival of the World War 2 officially changed that.
Thumbnail picture of the Dornier Do 215

1941
Dornier Do 217
The Dornier Do 217 proved itself a sound weapons platform on the whole, though not excelling in any one role.
Thumbnail picture of the Dornier Do 217

1938
Dornier Do 22
Despite its production in Germany, the Do 22 never flew for the Luftwaffe.
Thumbnail picture of the Dornier Do 22

1934
Dornier Do 23
The Dornier Do 23 led a short service life with the German Luftwaffe before being replaced by the capable Heinkel He 111.
Thumbnail picture of the Dornier Do 23

1937
Dornier Do 24
The Dornier Do 24 is one of the few World War 2 aircraft with the distinction of having served on both sides of the conflict.
Thumbnail picture of the Dornier Do 24

1945
Dornier Do 335 Pfeil (Arrow)
The Dornier Do 335 would have made for one outstanding Luftwaffe fighter and interceptor had it been ready in time.
Thumbnail picture of the Dornier Do 335 Pfeil (Arrow)

1941
Douglas A-20 Havoc / Boston
The Douglas A-20 Havoc proved a suitable and adaptable light bomber and night-fighter for Allied forces of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas A-20 Havoc / Boston

1941
Douglas A-24 Banshee
The Douglas A-24 Banshee was the U.S. Army version of the U.S. Navy SBD Dauntless dive bomber with a few changes to suit the service.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas A-24 Banshee

1944
Douglas A-26 / B-26 Invader
The Douglas A-26 Invader ultimately proved a success in World War 2, the Korean War, and the early stages of the Vietnam Conflict.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas A-26 / B-26 Invader

1936
Douglas B-18 Bolo
The Douglas B-18 Bolo medium bomber made up a large part of the U.S. Army Air Force bomber squadrons in 1940.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas B-18 Bolo

1944
Douglas BTD Destroyer
The end of the war signaled the end of Destroyer production, ending with 30 examples with none seeing combat service.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas BTD Destroyer

1940
Douglas C-47 Skytrain / Dakota
The Douglas C-47 Skytrain was perhaps the most famous of the storied transport aircraft of World War 2 - seeing combat into the Vietnam War years.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas C-47 Skytrain / Dakota

1942
Douglas C-54 Skymaster (DC-4)
The C-54 Skymaster was a pivotal American aircraft serving actively throughout the Berlin Airlift.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas C-54 Skymaster (DC-4)

1945
Douglas C-74 Globemaster
The Douglas C-74 began the line of long-tenured Globemaster transports embodied in the modern Globemaster III series today.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas C-74 Globemaster

1934
Douglas DC-2
The Douglas DC-2 proved passenger safety and comfort to a suspect 1930s public.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas DC-2

1936
Douglas DC-3
Over 16,000 examples of the successful Douglas DC-3 aircraft were ultimately produced.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas DC-3

1942
Douglas P-70 Nighthawk
Lacking options in October of 1940, the USAAC adopted converted Douglas A-20 Havocs as P-70 night fighters.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas P-70 Nighthawk

1938
Douglas SBD Dauntless
The SBD Dauntless bomber was the principle Allied dive bomber in the Pacific Theater of Operations.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas SBD Dauntless

1937
Douglas TBD Devastator
Once on the cutting edge of naval aviation technology, the TBD Devastator was made obsolete by the time of Pearl Harbor.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas TBD Devastator

1941
Douglas XB-19 (XBLR-2)
Eighteen crew were required to staff the enormous experimental Douglas XB-19 Heavy Bomber - of which only a single prototype was ever completed.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas XB-19 (XBLR-2)

1944
Douglas XB-42 Mixmaster
The Douglas XB-42 Mixmaster bomber proposal utilized a distinct twin engine arrangement in a pusher configuration.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas XB-42 Mixmaster

1945
Douglas XTB2D Skypirate
Only two of the proposed Douglas XTB2D Skypirate torpedo bombers were built before the project saw cancellation in 1947.
Thumbnail picture of the Douglas XTB2D Skypirate

1940
Fairey Albacore
Intended to succeed the famous Fairey Swordfish biplane torpedo bomber, the Fairey Albacore failed in this respect but managed a fairly useful service life during World War 2 nonetheless.
Thumbnail picture of the Fairey Albacore

1943
Fairey Barracuda
The Fairey Albacore stocked the inventory of many Fleet Air Arm squadrons during World War 2 action.
Thumbnail picture of the Fairey Barracuda

1937
Fairey Battle
By the time of World War 2, the Fairey Battle was wholly-outclassed by smaller, more nimble fighter types unleashed by the Germans.
Thumbnail picture of the Fairey Battle

1943
Fairey Firefly
The Fairey Firefly proved to be an underrated success in multiple theaters of operation concerning World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Fairey Firefly

1940
Fairey Fulmar
The Fairey Fulmar served through 600 examples and these solely with the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm during the early part of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Fairey Fulmar

1937
Fairey Seafox
The Fairey Seafox served the British Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm across sixty-six total examples.
Thumbnail picture of the Fairey Seafox

1945
Fairey Spearfish
Brought to life in 1943, the Fairey Spearfish was only ever completed in five examples due to the end of the war in 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Fairey Spearfish

1936
Fairey Swordfish
The Fairey Swordfish, despite its World War 1-era appearance, was an unsung hero of the Allied cause against Axis naval forces.
Thumbnail picture of the Fairey Swordfish

1936
Fiat BR.20 Cicogna (Stork)
Though a capable bombing platform, the Fiat BR.20 Cicogna was simply outclassed at the start of the Second World War.
Thumbnail picture of the Fiat BR.20 Cicogna (Stork)

1938
Fiat CR.32
The Fiat CR.42 was one of the best inter-war designed fighters to ever see service, though largely outclassed by the start of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Fiat CR.32

1939
Fiat CR.42 Falco (Falcon)
The Fiat CR.42 was designed off the successes of the CR.32, with Italy still believing in the capabilities of biplane aircraft.
Thumbnail picture of the Fiat CR.42 Falco (Falcon)

1938
Fiat G.50 Freccia (Arrow)
The Fiat G.50 Freccia was initially tested on the combat grounds that was the Spanish Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Fiat G.50 Freccia (Arrow)

1943
Fiat G.55 Centauro (Centaur)
The inline Fiat G.55 Centauro proved a major upgrade for the preceding radial-powered Fiat G.50 Freccia.
Thumbnail picture of the Fiat G.55 Centauro (Centaur)

1944
Fieseler Fi 103R (Reichenberg)
The Fi 103R was the piloted version of the devastating and effective V-1 terror rocket.
Thumbnail picture of the Fieseler Fi 103R (Reichenberg)

1937
Fieseler Fi 156 Storch (Stork)
The Fieseler Fi 156 Storch was a multi-faceted performer for the Third Reich in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Fieseler Fi 156 Storch (Stork)

1943
Fisher XP-75 / P-75 Eagle
Unfortunately for the Fisher XP-75 Eagle, it fulfilled a requirement no longer needed by the United States Army Air Forces.
Thumbnail picture of the Fisher XP-75 / P-75 Eagle

1939
Flettner Fl 265
The German Kriegsmarine was interested in this Anton Flettner design concept for use in spotting enemy warships.
Thumbnail picture of the Flettner Fl 265

1942
Flettner Fl 282 Kolibri (Hummingbird)
The Flettner Fl 282 became the first helictoper in history to be used in a military applicable role - this by the German Kriegsmarine in 1942.
Thumbnail picture of the Flettner Fl 282 Kolibri (Hummingbird)

1941
Focke-Achgelis Fa 223 Drache (Dragon)
The German Focke-Achgelis Fa 223 became the first true military transport helicopter when it saw active service in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Achgelis Fa 223 Drache (Dragon)

1937
Focke-Wulf Fw 187 Falke (Falcon)
The Focke-Wulf design of the Fw 187 Falcon compared favorably in most respects to the Messerschmitt Bf 110 design.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Fw 187 Falke (Falcon)

1940
Focke-Wulf Fw 189 Uhu (Owl)
The Focke-Wulf Fw 189 Owl was utilized in the reconnaissance and the nightfighting role, particularly on the Eastern Front.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Fw 189 Uhu (Owl)

1941
Focke-Wulf Fw 190 (Wurger)
The Focke-Wulf Fw 190 fighter is regarded by many to be the best German fighter aircraft of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Fw 190 (Wurger)

1942
Focke-Wulf Fw 191
Three Focke-Wulf Fw 191 bomber prototypes were completed before the program was cancelled in full.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Fw 191

1938
Focke-Wulf Fw 200 (Condor)
The Fw 200 was the lesser-known of the German World War 2 bombers, relegated to maritime anti-shipping duty and VIP transport.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Fw 200 (Condor)

1944
Focke-Wulf Fw 3x1000C
Focke-Wulf designed a single-seat, all-wing, turbojet-powered bomber - the Fw 3x1000C - for a new 1943 RLM requirement that fell to naught.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Fw 3x1000C

1944
Focke-Wulf Fw P.VII (Flitzer)
The Focke-Wulf Fw P.7 jet-and-rocket-powered fighter only reached the mock-up stage before the end of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Fw P.VII (Flitzer)

1943
Focke-Wulf Projekt II
The Focke-Wulf Projekt II jet-powered fighter emerged from designer Kurt Tank during World War 2 as a design study and nothing more.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Projekt II

1944
Focke-Wulf Projekt Kamikaze Carrier
The Focke-Wulf Kamikaze Carrier project would have carried one or several suicide aircraft under her wings - in essence serving as a mothership of sorts.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Projekt Kamikaze Carrier

1945
Focke-Wulf Super Lorin
Like so many other German Luftwaffe paper airplane projects of World War 2, the rocket-and-ramjet-powered Super Lorin interceptor failed to materialize before the end.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Super Lorin

1945
Focke-Wulf Ta 152
The Focke-Wulf Ta 152 was intended as a high-level interceptor based on the successful Fw 190D-9 fighter airframe.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Ta 152

1944
Focke-Wulf Ta 154 Moskito (Mosquito)
The Focke-Wulf Ta 154 Mokito might have played a more prominent role had production issues not derailed the project.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Ta 154 Moskito (Mosquito)

1945
Focke-Wulf Ta 183 (Huckebein)
The Focke-Wulf Ta 183 was only in the prototype phase at the end of the Second World War and thus never flew.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Ta 183 (Huckebein)

1945
Focke-Wulf Ta 283
The Focke-Wulf Ta 283 was a proposed German wartime fighter-interceptor utilizing a combination rocket-ramjet propulsion scheme.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Ta 283

1945
Focke-Wulf Ta 400 (Amerika Bomber)
Part of the heavy bomber German initiative of World War 2, the Focke-Wulf Ta 400 only ever became an incomplete prototype by the end of the war.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Ta 400 (Amerika Bomber)

1938
Fokker D.XXI
The Fokker D.XXI was a serviceable aircraft and saw its best days in the hands of Finnish pilots against the Soviets.
Thumbnail picture of the Fokker D.XXI

1938
Fokker G.I (Reaper)
Only about fifty of the type were ever produced, those in service eventually captured by Germany and used as BF110 crew trainers.
Thumbnail picture of the Fokker G.I (Reaper)

1939
Fokker T.IX
The German invasion of the Netherlands cancelled all further development of the Fokker T.IX program.
Thumbnail picture of the Fokker T.IX

1938
Fokker T.V
The few examples of the Fokker T.V available at the time of the German invasion of The Netherlands saw little success in combat.
Thumbnail picture of the Fokker T.V

1939
Fokker T.VIII
The Dutch-originated Fokker T.VIII floatplane torpedo bomber fought for several sides during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Fokker T.VIII

1926
Ford Trimotor
Nearly 200 of the Ford Trimotor transport aircraft were produced from the middle of the 1920s on - some eighteen still fly today.
Thumbnail picture of the Ford Trimotor

1942
General Aircraft Hamilcar
The General Aircraft Hamilcar heavy glider was used to ferry troops, vehicles and supplies during large-scale airborne-minded operations.
Thumbnail picture of the General Aircraft Hamilcar

1944
Gloster / Armstrong Whitworth Meteor
The Gloster Meteor became the first operational British jet-powered fighter on July 27th, 1944 - this during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Gloster / Armstrong Whitworth Meteor

1941
Gloster E.28/39
Only two Gloster E.28-39 experimental aircraft were built - becoming the first jet-powered aircraft to fly for the British.
Thumbnail picture of the Gloster E.28/39

1935
Gloster Gauntlet
The Gloster Gauntlet was the last RAF aircraft to sport an open-air cockpit in a biplane airframe.
Thumbnail picture of the Gloster Gauntlet

1937
Gloster Gladiator
The Gloster Gladiator was already made obsolete by the time of its inception, yet the type soldiered on through 1944.
Thumbnail picture of the Gloster Gladiator

1945
Goodyear F2G Super Corsair
Proposed as an improved low-altitude version of the classic Vought F4U Corsair navy fighter, the Goodyear F2G Corsair was doomed by the end of World War 2 coming in 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Goodyear F2G Super Corsair

1945
Gotha Go P.60A/B
The Gotha P.60 Day Fighter and Interceptor was an attempt to unseat the Horten Ho 229 flying wing production order.
Thumbnail picture of the Gotha Go P.60A/B

1945
Gotha Go P.60C
The Gotha Project 60C jet-powered nightfighter was conceived of in the final months of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Gotha Go P.60C

1941
Gotha Go.242
Towed glider transports like the Gotha Go.242 proved very important to airborne operations of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Gotha Go.242

1941
Gotha Go.244
The Gotha Go.244 transport was the powered form of the original Go.242 unpowered glider transport.
Thumbnail picture of the Gotha Go.244

1936
Grumman F3F
Grumman continued its relationship as a USN fighter supplier, delivering their useful F3F series biplane in 1936.
Thumbnail picture of the Grumman F3F

1940
Grumman F4F Wildcat
Originally conceived of as a biplane, the Grumman F4F Wildcat became a critical component to the early going of World War 2 for the Allies.
Thumbnail picture of the Grumman F4F Wildcat

1943
Grumman F6F Hellcat
The classic Grumman F6F Hellcat fighter was known to make an Ace out of the many pilots who flew it during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Grumman F6F Hellcat

1945
Grumman F8F Bearcat
The Grumman F8F Bearcat was one of the fastest piston-engine aircraft of its time, its performance on par with early jet-powered fighters.
Thumbnail picture of the Grumman F8F Bearcat

1937
Grumman Goose (G-21)
The Grumman Goose was a true unsung war hero in World War 2, involved in transport, training and at sea rescue operations.
Thumbnail picture of the Grumman Goose (G-21)

1936
Grumman J2F Duck
The Grumman J2F Duck served with all major branches of the United States military during its tenure.
Thumbnail picture of the Grumman J2F Duck

1942
Grumman TBF Avenger
The Grumman TBF Avenger torpedo bomber saw nearly 10,000 produced during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Grumman TBF Avenger

1941
Grumman XP-50 Skyrocket
The Grumman XP-50 came in a close second to the Lockheed XP-38 for the US Army - the latter going on to become a classic fighter of the 20th Century.
Thumbnail picture of the Grumman XP-50 Skyrocket

1940
Handley Page Halifax
The Handley Page Halifax bomber shined in both night-bombing and airborne support roles during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Handley Page Halifax

1938
Handley Page Hampden
On the whole, the Handley Page Hampden offered limited value to the Allies during the early going of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Handley Page Hampden

1931
Hawker Fury (I & II)
The Hawker Fury I and II were a vital part of the British air defense effort during the inter-war years.
Thumbnail picture of the Hawker Fury (I & II)

1937
Hawker Hurricane
The true star of the Battle of Britain was the rugged and reliable Hawker Hurricane.
Thumbnail picture of the Hawker Hurricane

1945
Hawker Sea Fury / Fury
The Hawker Sea Fury was one of the fastest piston-engined fighters ever produced and the last prop-driven aircraft of the British Royal Navy.
Thumbnail picture of the Hawker Sea Fury / Fury

1941
Hawker Sea Hurricane
The Hawker Sea Hurricane of World War 2 was a forced navalization of the successful, war-winning, land-based Hawker Hurricane monoplane fighter.
Thumbnail picture of the Hawker Sea Hurricane

1944
Hawker Tempest
The Hawker Tempest was a successful attempt to better the deficiencies of the earlier Hawker Typhoon design in its intended interceptor role.
Thumbnail picture of the Hawker Tempest

1939
Hawker Tornado
Intended to replace the Hawker Hurricane, the Hawker Tornado was produced in only three prototypes and a single production form.
Thumbnail picture of the Hawker Tornado

1941
Hawker Typhoon
Despite being designed as a high-altitude interceptor, the Hawker Typhoon proved to be an excellent low-altitude performer.
Thumbnail picture of the Hawker Typhoon

1935
Heinkel He 111
The most important of the German medium bombers became the classic Heinkel He 111 series - a prewar design that managed to fight into the final days of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 111

1942
Heinkel He 111Z (Zwilling)
The dual-fuselage, five-engine Heinkel He 111 Zwilling was specifically designed as a heavy transport powerful enough to tow the large Messerschmitt Me 321 cargo gliders.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 111Z (Zwilling)

1935
Heinkel He 112
The serviceable Heinkel He 112 lost out to the Messerschmitt Bf 109 to be Germany's first new generation standard monoplane fighter.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 112

1939
Heinkel He 115
The Heinkel He 115 is considered by many as the best seaplane to have served in World War 2 on any side.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 115

1945
Heinkel He 162 Volksjager (Peoples Fighter)
The German Heinkel He 162 was of an advanced, single-seat, single jet engine design, appearing in limited active numbers towards the end of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 162 Volksjager (Peoples Fighter)

1939
Heinkel He 176
Lackluster performance doomed the all-liquid fueled Heinkel He 176 rocket plane.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 176

1942
Heinkel He 177 Greif (Griffin)
The Heinkel He 177 Greif might have been a serviceable heavy bomber for Germany had it not been plagued with engine troubles.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 177 Greif (Griffin)

1939
Heinkel He 178
The Heinkel He 178 became the first practical turbojet-powered aircraft to fly on August 27th, 1939.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 178

1943
Heinkel He 219 Uhu (Eagle-Owl)
The Heinkel He 219 was an excellent German night-fighter for its time, limited in part by inherent complexity as well as internal dissension within the German ranks.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 219 Uhu (Eagle-Owl)

1943
Heinkel He 277 (Amerika Bomber)
Like other multi-engine heavy bomber projects of the Germans during World War 2, little became of the Heinkel He 277 design.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 277 (Amerika Bomber)

1941
Heinkel He 280
The Heinkel He 280 became the first ever turbojet aircraft designed from the outset as a military fighter.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 280

1944
Heinkel He 343 (Strahlbomber / Strabo 16)
The Heinkel He 343 was a proposed four engine jet bomber being developed towards the end of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 343 (Strahlbomber / Strabo 16)

1935
Heinkel He 51
The Heinkel He 51 series was part of Germany's rebuilding program, providing priceless combat experience for Luftwaffe pilots in the Spanish Civil War.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 51

1935
Heinkel He 59
A pre-war design, the Heinkel He 59 floatplane biplane was outmatched heading into 1944 and did not survive in service long enough to see the end of the conflict.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 59

1933
Heinkel He 70 (Blitz)
For its time, the Heinkel He 70 was a fast reconnaissance bomber but limited in what it could carry.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 70 (Blitz)

1945
Heinkel He P.1077 (Julia)
The Heinkel He P.1077 rocket-powered interceptor was approved but evolved too slowly and never saw a single prototype completed by the end of the war.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He P.1077 (Julia)

1945
Heinkel He P.1078B
The Heinkel P.1078B project made up the second of three P.1078 jet-powered fighter projects for the Heinkel concern during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He P.1078B

1945
Heinkel He P.1078C
The Heinkel He P.1078C proposal was delivered for consideration in the Luftwaffe Emergency Fighter Program at the end of 1944.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He P.1078C

1944
Heinkel Lerche (Lark)
The Heinkel Lerche VTOL interceptor was one of several VTOL design studies undertaken by the Germans during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel Lerche (Lark)

1936
Henschel Hs 123
The Henschel Hs 123 was quite successful during its limited service run, eventually being supplanted by the highly-effective Junkers Ju 87 Stuka series of monoplane dive bombers.
Thumbnail picture of the Henschel Hs 123

1942
Henschel Hs 129
The Henschel Hs 129 fulfilled the all-important role of close-support strike aircraft for the German Luftwaffe during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Henschel Hs 129

1945
Henschel Hs 132
The Henschel Hs 132 was intended as a jet-powered dive bomber but only one complete prototype was available by the end of the war.
Thumbnail picture of the Henschel Hs 132

1941
Henschel Hs P.75
The Henschel Hs P.75 heavy fighter and its distinct canard configuration was not furthered beyond the wind tunnel model stage.
Thumbnail picture of the Henschel Hs P.75

1945
Horten Ho IX / Horten Ho 229
The Ho 229 brought about many firsts - advanced swept-back wings, a jet-powered flying wing design and radar absorbing stealth technology.
Thumbnail picture of the Horten Ho IX / Horten Ho 229

1945
Horten Ho XVIII (Amerika Bomber)
Luftwaffe leader Hermann Goring accepted the Horten Ho XVIII Amerika Bomber flying wing proposal for immediate construction.
Thumbnail picture of the Horten Ho XVIII (Amerika Bomber)

1944
Horton Ho X
The Horten X continued the Horten Brothers love affair with the flying wing concept, though the fighter was never completed.
Thumbnail picture of the Horton Ho X

1945
Hughes H-4 Hercules (Spruce Goose)
The Hughes H-4 Hercules, ridiculed as the Spruce Goose, remains the largest flying boat ever constructed and features the largest wingspan of any aircraft ever made.
Thumbnail picture of the Hughes H-4 Hercules (Spruce Goose)

1943
Hughes Model D-2 (XP-73 / XA-37)
Known under many designations, the Hughes Model D-2 suffered through its ever-changing developmental life - seeing only one prototype partially completed.
Thumbnail picture of the Hughes Model D-2 (XP-73 / XA-37)

1946
Hughes XR-11 / XF-11
The XF-11 only saw two produced prototypes, the first crashing into the suburb of Beverly Hills with Hughes at the controls.
Thumbnail picture of the Hughes XR-11 / XF-11

1941
IAR 80 / IAR 81
Development of the serviceable IAR 80 was slow and, though the fighter was of a capable breed when it first appeared, the system was highly outclassed by 1944.
Thumbnail picture of the IAR 80 / IAR 81

1941
Ilyushin IL-2 Sturmovik
The Ilyushin IL-2 series became a critical component of the Soviet response to the German invasion of 1941.
Thumbnail picture of the Ilyushin IL-2 Sturmovik

1937
Ilyushin IL-4
The Ilyushin IL-4 appeared in over 5,000 examples and became an equally important aircraft to the Soviet Air Force than its more popular sister, the IL-2.
Thumbnail picture of the Ilyushin IL-4

1943
Junkers Ju 187
The abandoned Junkers Ju 187 was intended to replace the much-feared - though outclassed - Ju 87 Stuka in the dive bombing role for the German Luftwaffe.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 187

1943
Junkers Ju 188 Rache (Avenger)
The Junkers Ju 188 Rache was a solid design and good performer, though appearing several years too late to make an impact.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 188 Rache (Avenger)

1943
Junkers Ju 252
Intended as a successor to the Junkers Ju 52 series, the Ju 252 was produced in only 15 examples.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 252

1944
Junkers Ju 287
The Junkers Ju 287 was one of the more unique green-lighted German jet-powered aircraft projects to appear during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 287

1942
Junkers Ju 290
The Junkers Ju 290 four-engined aircraft saw limited production during World War 2 but served in several key roles for the Luftwaffe.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 290

1943
Junkers Ju 352 (Herkules)
Some fifty of the Junkers Ju 352 Herkules transports were produced during the fighting of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 352 (Herkules)

1944
Junkers Ju 388 (Stortebeker)
Roughly 100 of the Junkers Ju 388 multi-role heavy fighters were produced before the end of World War 2 in 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 388 (Stortebeker)

1943
Junkers Ju 390 (New York Bomber)
The Junkers Ju 390 multi-engine long-range heavy bomber was to strike at the heart of major American cities - changing German wartime fortunes ultimately revised this need.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 390 (New York Bomber)

1932
Junkers Ju 52
The Junkers Ju 52 proved a popular transport platform for a plethora of operators throughout World War 2 and beyond.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 52

1936
Junkers Ju 86
The Junkers Ju 86 served as passenger airliner, reconnaissance platform and bomber during her tenure.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 86

1937
Junkers Ju 87 (Stuka)
Performance limitations aside, the Junkers Ju 87 Stuka was an effectively devastating weapon for the German Luftwaffe in the early part of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 87 (Stuka)

1939
Junkers Ju 88
Like the Dornier Do 17 and the Heinkel He 111, the Junkers Ju 88 became a mainstay of the German Luftwaffe bombing campaigns throughout all of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 88

1945
Junkers Ju EF 140 (Amerika Bomber)
The Junkers contribution to the German wartime Amerika Bomber program was its Ju EF 140 design.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju EF 140 (Amerika Bomber)

1945
Kaiser-Fleetwings XBTK
The single-seat Kaiser-Fleetwings XBTK naval bomber prototype was produced in just five prototypes and never adopted.
Thumbnail picture of the Kaiser-Fleetwings XBTK

1938
Kawanishi H6K (Mavis)
The Kawanishi H6K series was really the only viable long-range flying boat in service with the Empire of Japan when the nation went to war in 1941.
Thumbnail picture of the Kawanishi H6K (Mavis)

1942
Kawanishi H8K (Emily)
The Kawanishi H8K Emily was arguably the best flying boat of the Second World War - considered by many to be on par with even the excellent British Short Sunderland.
Thumbnail picture of the Kawanishi H8K (Emily)

1943
Kawanishi N1K1 Kyofu (Rex)
The impressive Kawanishi N1K1 Kyofu fighting floatplane arrived to fulfill a wartime requirement that was no longer there.
Thumbnail picture of the Kawanishi N1K1 Kyofu (Rex)

1943
Kawanishi N1K-J Shiden (George)
By all accounts, the Kawanishi Shiden was an outstanding performer, regarded as the best Japanese fighter of the war, and fared favorably to the American F6F Hellcat.
Thumbnail picture of the Kawanishi N1K-J Shiden (George)

1945
Kawasaki Ki-100
The Kawasaki Ki-100 was the definitive high-performance fighter for Imperial Japan, oft-regarded as the best fighter the country fielded by the end of the war in 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Kawasaki Ki-100

1944
Kawasaki Ki-102 (Randy)
The Kawasaki Ki-102 was developed specifically to replace the Kawasaki Ki-45 Toryu series of heavy fighters.
Thumbnail picture of the Kawasaki Ki-102 (Randy)

1944
Kawasaki Ki-45 KAIc Toryu (Nick)
The Kawasaki Ki-45 Toryu served as the Imperial Japanese Armys only night-fighter of the Second World war.
Thumbnail picture of the Kawasaki Ki-45 KAIc Toryu (Nick)

1942
Kawasaki Ki-45 Toryu (Nick)
The Kawasaki Ki-45 Toryu proved to be a most capable platform as a twin-engine fighter - particularly this KAIc nightfighter variant.
Thumbnail picture of the Kawasaki Ki-45 Toryu (Nick)

1940
Kawasaki Ki-48 Sokei (Lily)
After witnessing the usefulness of the Soviet Tupolev SB-2 bomber seires, Japanese authorities adopted the Kawasaki Ki-48 of similar form and function.
Thumbnail picture of the Kawasaki Ki-48 Sokei (Lily)

1941
Kawasaki Ki-60
The prototype Japanese Kawasaki Ki-60 utilized the German Diamler-Benz DB 601 series inline piston engine as the Kawasaki Ha-40.
Thumbnail picture of the Kawasaki Ki-60

1943
Kawasaki Ki-61 Hien (Tony)
The Kawasaki Ki-61 Hien was another capable performance fighter aircraft in Japanese service during the middle and latter years of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Kawasaki Ki-61 Hien (Tony)

1943
Kawasaki Ki-64 (Rob)
First flight of the Kawasaki Ki-64 heavy fighter was undertaken in December of 1943 though the program was ultimately given up for good the following year with only one completed example.
Thumbnail picture of the Kawasaki Ki-64 (Rob)

1943
Kawasaki Ki-96
Only three prototypes of the Kawasaki Ki-96 twin-engined heavy fighter were ever completed before the end of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Kawasaki Ki-96

1938
Koolhoven F.K.56
The Koolhoven F.K.56 trainer served both the Belgian and Dutch air forces prior to World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Koolhoven F.K.56

1940
Koolhoven F.K.58
Only twelve complete examples of the Dutch Koolhoven FK-58 fighter were ever completed, some seeing combat in the fateful Battle for France of June 1940.
Thumbnail picture of the Koolhoven F.K.58

1945
Kyushu J7W Shinden (Magnificent Lightning)
The Kyushu J7W Shinden was specifically developed to combat the destructive Boeing B-29 Superfortresses wreaking havoc on Japanese infrastructure.
Thumbnail picture of the Kyushu J7W Shinden (Magnificent Lightning)

1942
Kyushu K11W Shiragiku (White Chrysanthemum)
The Kyushu K11W Shiragiku played the all-important role of bomber crew trainer for the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Kyushu K11W Shiragiku (White Chrysanthemum)

1945
Kyushu Q1W Tokai (Eastern Sea) / (Lorna)
Though ordered in 1942, the Kyushu Q1W Tokai arrived in the final year of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Kyushu Q1W Tokai (Eastern Sea) / (Lorna)

1938
Latecoere 298
Even the pinnacle of French seaplane design - the Latecoere 298 series - could do little to stem the tide of the German invasion of France in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Latecoere 298

1942
Lavochkin La-5
The Lavochkin La-5 series was fielded in great quantities since its inception, taking part in some of the great Soviet-German air battles of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Lavochkin La-5

1944
Lavochkin La-7
The Lavochkin La-7 prop-powered fighter appeared as an improved La-5 in the later years of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Lavochkin La-7

1941
Lavochkin LaGG-3
The LaGG-3 attempted to right the wrongs presented in the LaGG-1 design and introduced modern aircraft design to the Soviet Union.
Thumbnail picture of the Lavochkin LaGG-3

1928
Liore-et-Olivier LeO 25
The rugged LeO 25 series of French bombers was a heavy participant during interwar service and proved completed outmoded by the time of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Liore-et-Olivier LeO 25

1938
Liore-et-Olivier LeO 45
One of the most advanced bombers at the time of its inception, the LeO 45 series was simply not available in the numbers required to defend France.
Thumbnail picture of the Liore-et-Olivier LeO 45

1944
Lippisch P.13A
One of the most fascinating and unorthodox of all the viable German jet-powered designs was the coal-burning Lippisch P.13A delta-winged interceptor.
Thumbnail picture of the Lippisch P.13A

1945
Lockheed C-69 Constellation
The Lockheed C-69 Constellation would earn more fame as a passenger transport than in its militarized counterpart.
Thumbnail picture of the Lockheed C-69 Constellation

1942
Lockheed L-133 Starjet
The Lockheed L-133 Starjet was submitted for USAF consideration as a single-seat, jet-powered fighter - it was not furthered.
Thumbnail picture of the Lockheed L-133 Starjet

1939
Lockheed P-38 Lightning
The Lockheed P-38 Lightning garnered the nicknamed of Forked-Tailed Devil from the Germans due to its effectiveness and unique shape.
Thumbnail picture of the Lockheed P-38 Lightning

1945
Lockheed P-80 / F-80 Shooting Star
Though developed as early as 1943, the Lockheed P-80 jet fighter arrived too late to be used in World War 2, playing a larger role in the Korean War instead.
Thumbnail picture of the Lockheed P-80 / F-80 Shooting Star

1942
Lockheed PV-1 Ventura / PV-2 Harpoon
The Lockheeh Ventura series was used in number by the US and British and replaced the Lockheed Hudson series of bombers.
Thumbnail picture of the Lockheed PV-1 Ventura / PV-2 Harpoon

1942
Lockheed XP-49
Looking very much like the P-38, the XP-49 failed to replace its older Lockheed brother.
Thumbnail picture of the Lockheed XP-49

1944
Lockheed XP-58 Chain Lightning
The Lockheed XP-58 Chain Lightning product was yet another failed attempt to improve upon the successes of the war-winning P-38 Lightning.
Thumbnail picture of the Lockheed XP-58 Chain Lightning

1939
Loire-Nieuport LN.401/LN.411 (LN.40)
The LN.401 was delivered in limited quantity to the French Navy and saw heavy losses in the German invasion of France.
Thumbnail picture of the Loire-Nieuport LN.401/LN.411 (LN.40)

1943
Luftwaffe Mistel (Mistletoe)
Luftwaffe Mistel programs were trialed as early as 1942 and evolved considerably throughout the rest of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Luftwaffe Mistel (Mistletoe)

1939
Macchi C.200 Saetta (Lightning)
The Macchi MC.200 Saetta represented one of the new generation of Italian-produced, piston-engine fighters eventually used in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Macchi C.200 Saetta (Lightning)

1941
Macchi C.202 Folgore (Thunderbolt)
The Macchi C.202 Folgore proved an outstanding fighter design, lacking only proper armament to contend with the new breed of enemy fighters and bombers.
Thumbnail picture of the Macchi C.202 Folgore (Thunderbolt)

1943
Macchi C.205 Veltro (Greyhound)
Like the Reggiane Re.2005 and FIAT G.55, the Macchi C.205 made use of the German Daimler-Benz DB 605 series engine.
Thumbnail picture of the Macchi C.205 Veltro (Greyhound)

1948
Martin AM Mauler
An order for 783 Martin Maulers became just 149 production examples with the end of World War 2 in 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Martin AM Mauler

1941
Martin B-26 Marauder
After some early setbacks, the Martin B-26 Marauder became a USAAF stalwart and operated with distinction as a medium bomber during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Martin B-26 Marauder

1941
Martin Baltimore
Though produced in limited numbers - and neglected by the USAAF - the Baltimore found life with the British Royal Air Force and others during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Martin Baltimore

1943
Martin JRM Mars
The Martin JRM Mars began as an armed patrol bomber for the US Navy until modified for the unarmed transport role during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Martin JRM Mars

1940
Martin Maryland
The American-made Martin Maryland saw limited use in limited quantities with foreign forces during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Martin Maryland

1941
Martin PBM-3 / PBM-5 Mariner
While a serviceable and very capable aircraft in its own right, the Martin Mariner flying boat would never reach the popularity of the older Consolidated PBY Catalina.
Thumbnail picture of the Martin PBM-3 / PBM-5 Mariner

1943
McDonnell XP-67 Bat / Moonbat
The XP-67 was an elegant first attempt at fighter building for McDonnell.
Thumbnail picture of the McDonnell XP-67 Bat / Moonbat

1934
Messerschmitt Bf 108 Taifun (Typhoon)
The Messerschmitt Bf 109 owed much of its design to the record-setting Bf 108 model series.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt  Bf 108 Taifun (Typhoon)

1937
Messerschmitt Bf 109
The exceptional Bf 109 fighter was more than a handful for allied fighter pilots and bomber crews.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Bf 109

1937
Messerschmitt Bf 110 Zerstorer (Destroyer)
During World War 2, the German Messerschmitt Bf 110 twin-engine heavy fighter found periods of success and failure.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Bf 110 Zerstorer (Destroyer)

1944
Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet (Comet)
The explosive - literally and figuratively - Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet was the first operational combat aircraft design to incorporate swept wings.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet (Comet)

1943
Messerschmitt Me 209-II
The Messerschmitt Me 209-II was designed as a possible replacement for the Luftwaffe's hugely popular Messerschmitt BF 109 fighter series.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me 209-II

1943
Messerschmitt Me 210
The Messerschmitt Me 210 was a failed successor to the famous Messerschmitt Bf 110 twin-engine heavy fighter line.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me 210

1944
Messerschmitt Me 262 (Schwalbe / Sturmvogel)
The German Messerschmitt Me 262 Schwalbe of World War 2 became the first operational-level jet-powered military fighter in the world.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me 262 (Schwalbe / Sturmvogel)

1942
Messerschmitt Me 264 (Amerika Bomber)
The massive Messerschmitt Me 264 long-range bomber was cancelled on September 23rd, 1944 - this after three were constructed.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me 264 (Amerika Bomber)

1942
Messerschmitt Me 309
The Messerschmitt Me 309 was intended as a direct successor to the famous Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighter series.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me 309

1941
Messerschmitt Me 321 Gigant (Giant)
The German Messerschmitt Me 321 glider of World War 2 was neither a success nor a failure.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me 321 Gigant (Giant)

1943
Messerschmitt Me 323 Gigant (Giant)
The Messerschmitt Me 323 Giant had its origins in the massive Me 321 unpowered military glider.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me 323 Gigant (Giant)

1944
Messerschmitt Me 328
The Messerschmitt Me 328 was intended from the beginning to be an easy-to-produce fighter designed for mass production.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me 328

1943
Messerschmitt Me 410 Hornisse (Hornet)
The Messerschmitt Me 410 improved upon the failed Me 210 platform in a variety of ways, but eventually gave way to dedicated fighter production for Germany.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me 410 Hornisse (Hornet)

1944
Messerschmitt Me P.1101
The variable-wing Messerschmitt P.1101 never flew but its incomplete airframe was captured by the Allies and put under review in the United States, producing the Bell X-5.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me P.1101

1944
Messerschmitt Me P.1101/92
The impressive-looking Messeschmitt P.1101/92 did not proceed beyond the design stages during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me P.1101/92

1944
Messerschmitt Me P.1106
The Messerschmitt Me P.1106 fighter-interceptor was a major rewrite of the originally-proposed P.1101 variable-wing jet fighter.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me P.1106

1945
Messerschmitt Me P.1110
The Messerschmitt Me P.1110 jet-powered fighter-interceptor was developed in the late stages of World War 2 under the German Emergency Fighter Program initiative.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me P.1110

1945
Messerschmitt Me P.1111
A tailless design approach was used in finalizing the impressive-looking Messerschmitt P.1111 jet fighter of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me P.1111

1945
Messerschmitt Me P.1112
The Messerschmitt Me P.1112 proposal was a further evolution of the earlier P.1111 model.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me P.1112

1941
Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-1 / MiG-3
The MiG-3 was one of the faster Soviet piston-engine designs at the outset of hostilities, though still outclassed by the German Bf 109 and Fw 190 designs.
Thumbnail picture of the Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-1 / MiG-3

1940
Miles M.20
The Miles M.20 lightweight fighter was intended to be mass-produced as an emergency measure - only two prototypes were completed.
Thumbnail picture of the Miles M.20

1937
Mitsubishi A5M (Claude)
The Mitsubishi A5M was the precursor Japanese Navy monoplane to the fabled A6M Zero series.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi A5M (Claude)

1940
Mitsubishi A6M Rei-sen (Zero)
The Japanese Navy Mitsubishi A6M Zero carrier-borne fighter became synonymous with the Japanese military commitment over Asia and the Pacific during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi A6M Rei-sen (Zero)

1945
Mitsubishi A7M Reppu (Sam)
The Mitsubishi A7M Reppu was intended to replace the once-excellent A6M Zero for the Imperial Japanese Navy.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi A7M Reppu (Sam)

1941
Mitsubishi F1M (Pete)
The Mitsubishi F1M floatplane made exceptional use of aerodyanmic design to produce an elegant and useful military aircraft.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi F1M (Pete)

1936
Mitsubishi G3M Rikko (Nell)
The Mitsubishi G3M medium bomber was produced in over 1,000 examples beginning in 1936.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi G3M Rikko (Nell)

1941
Mitsubishi G4M (Betty)
The Mitsubishi G4M Betty will forever be linked to the ill-fated flight which saw the death of Japanese Admiral Yamamoto at the hands of American Lockheed P-38 Lightning fighters over Bougainville in 1943.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi G4M (Betty)

1942
Mitsubishi J2M Raiden (Jack)
The Mitsubishi J2M series Raiden became Japan's first dedicated interceptor of World War 2 when introduced in 1942.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi J2M Raiden (Jack)

1945
Mitsubishi J8M (Shusui)
The Mitsubishi J8M rocket-propelled interceptor was based on the German Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet - acquired by Japan via purchase of manufacturing rights.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi J8M (Shusui)

1944
Mitsubishi Ki-109
The Ki-109 was designed to deal exclusively with the threat that the new American Boeing B-29 Superfortress posed on Japan.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi Ki-109

1937
Mitsubishi Ki-15 (Babs)
Nicknamed Babs by the Allies, the Mitsubishi Ki-15 served as a reconnaissance platform and light bomber for both the IJA and IJN throughout World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi Ki-15 (Babs)

1939
Mitsubishi Ki-21 (Sally)
The Mitsubishi Ki-21 medium bomber started operational service in 1939 and lasted into the final months of the war, by then relegated to suicide kamikaze attacks.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi Ki-21 (Sally)

1938
Mitsubishi Ki-30 (Ann)
The Mitsubishi Ki-30 series found some early success in the campaign against neighboring China but was featured less as the Pacific Campaign expanded.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi Ki-30 (Ann)

1941
Mitsubishi Ki-46 (Dinah)
The Mitsubishi Ki-46 began as a reconnaissance aircraft and was later developed into a heavy fighter intended to intercept Allied bombers.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi Ki-46 (Dinah)

1940
Mitsubishi Ki-51 (Sonia)
While proving serviceable in the ground attack role, the Mitsubishi Ki-51 Sonia was relegated to kamikaze attacks by the end of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi Ki-51 (Sonia)

1944
Mitsubishi Ki-67 Hiryu (Peggy)
Though classified as a medium bomber by the Japanese, by Western standards, the Ki-67 Peggy was seen as a light bomber.
Thumbnail picture of the Mitsubishi Ki-67 Hiryu (Peggy)

1938
Morane-Saulnier MS 405 / 406
Despite its contemporary appearance, the M.S.406 was outclassed by the invading German Luftwaffe Bf 109 fighters.
Thumbnail picture of the Morane-Saulnier MS 405 / 406

1942
Nakajima A6M2-N (Rufe)
The Nakajima A6M-2 fighter was a floatplane derivative of the classic Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighter line of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Nakajima A6M2-N (Rufe)

1941
Nakajima B5N (Kate)
The Nakajima B5N Kate was the world's best carrier-based torpedo dive-bomber in 1941.
Thumbnail picture of the Nakajima B5N (Kate)

1942
Nakajima B6N Tenzan (Jill)
The Nakajima B6N Jill was fielded in quantity towards the end of the Second World War.
Thumbnail picture of the Nakajima B6N Tenzan (Jill)

1945
Nakajima G8N Renzan (Rita)
The Nakajima G8N Renzan never lived up to its potential, thanks in part to material shortages back home.
Thumbnail picture of the Nakajima G8N Renzan (Rita)

1942
Nakajima J1N1 Gekko (Irving)
The Nakajima J1N1 Gekko served several roles in the Imperial Japanese Navy of World War 2 including reconnaissance, night-fighter, and kamikaze strikes.
Thumbnail picture of the Nakajima J1N1 Gekko (Irving)

1945
Nakajima J9Y Kikka (Orange Blossom)
Based on the German Me 262 jet-powered fighter, the Nakajima Kikka was one of the Japanese contributions to jet-based aerial warfare by the end of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Nakajima J9Y Kikka (Orange Blossom)

1945
Nakajima Ki-115 Tsurugi
The Nakajima Ki-115 Tsurugi became a dedicated suicide fighter for Japan by the closing stages of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Nakajima Ki-115 Tsurugi

1946
Nakajima Ki-201 Karyu
The Imperial Japanese Army interpretation of the German Messerschmitt Me 262 plans was to become the Nakajima Ki-201 jet fighter.
Thumbnail picture of the Nakajima Ki-201 Karyu

1937
Nakajima Ki-27 (Nate / Abdul)
The Nakajima Ki-27 was the Imperial Japanese Army equivalent of the Imperial Japanese Navy Mitsubishi A5M.
Thumbnail picture of the Nakajima Ki-27  (Nate / Abdul)

1942
Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa (Oscar)
Production of the Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa fighter for Japan was topped only by the Mitsubishi A6M Zero series during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa (Oscar)

1941
Nakajima Ki-44 Shoki (Tojo)
As capable as the Nakajima Shoki series of interceptors were, the aircraft were relegated to the defense of the Japanese homeland.
Thumbnail picture of the Nakajima Ki-44 Shoki (Tojo)

1941
Nakajima Ki-49 Donryu (Helen)
The Nakajima Ki-49 Donryu was destined to replace the ill-equipped Ki-21 though the Ki-49 itself was a general failure in design.
Thumbnail picture of the Nakajima Ki-49 Donryu (Helen)

1944
Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate (Frank)
The Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate was one of the more important Japanese fighters in the final year of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate (Frank)

1943
North American A-36 Apache (Invader)
The North American A-36 Apache was based on an early-form P-51, though modified for the dive bomber and ground attack roles.
Thumbnail picture of the North American A-36 Apache (Invader)

1940
North American B-25 Mitchell
The North American B-25 Mitchell proved a crucial medium bomber component to the Allied war effort during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the North American B-25 Mitchell

1942
North American P-51 / F-51 Mustang
The P-51 is arguably the most recognized and celebrated American fighter of the Second World War.
Thumbnail picture of the North American P-51 / F-51 Mustang

1936
North American T-6 Texan
The Texan series saw production numbers surpass nearly 16,000 by the end of its run.
Thumbnail picture of the North American T-6 Texan

1942
North American XB-28 (Dragon)
The North American XB-28 Dragon was initially developed for the USAAC for the high-altitude bombing role until the need was no longer apparent for the new USAAF.
Thumbnail picture of the North American XB-28 (Dragon)

1941
Northrop N-1M
The Northrop N-1M flying wing research vehicle was in development throughout World War 2 and proved several concepts sound.
Thumbnail picture of the Northrop N-1M

1941
Northrop N-3PB Nomad
The American-designed and produced Northrop N-3PB floatplane was only ever fielded by the Royal Norwegian Navy Air Service.
Thumbnail picture of the Northrop N-3PB Nomad

1942
Northrop N-9M
The Northrop N-9M flying wing prototype proved critical to the development of the XB-35 flying wing program that followed.
Thumbnail picture of the Northrop N-9M

1943
Northrop P-61 / F-61 Black Widow
The Northrop P-61 Black Widow was the first American combat aircraft designed specifically for the night-fighting role.
Thumbnail picture of the Northrop P-61 / F-61 Black Widow

1943
Northrop XP-56 Black Bullet
The Northrop XP-56 was another Army Air Corps proposal to research the benefits of pusher-propeller design.
Thumbnail picture of the Northrop XP-56 Black Bullet

1945
Northrop XP-79
The Northrop XP-79 jet-powered flying wing project was cancelled after the single prototype was lost to accident.
Thumbnail picture of the Northrop XP-79

1946
Northrop YB-35
The impressive-looking Northrop YB-35 flying wing first flew in 1946 and was canceled as soon as 1949.
Thumbnail picture of the Northrop YB-35

1941
Petlyakov Pe-2 (Pawn)
The Petlyakov Pe-2 went on to become the best Soviet light tactical bomber of World War 2 with production netting 11,427 units.
Thumbnail picture of the Petlyakov Pe-2 (Pawn)

1941
Petlyakov Pe-3
The Petlyakov Pe-3 heavy fighter / night fighter variant developed from the successful Petlyakov Pe 2 line.
Thumbnail picture of the Petlyakov Pe-3

1940
Petlyakov Pe-8 (TB-7)
The Petlyakov Pe-8 was the only Soviet-made, four-engined strategic bomber to serve in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Petlyakov Pe-8 (TB-7)

1942
Piaggio P.108
The Piaggio P.108 served as the only Italian four-engine heavy bomber in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Piaggio P.108

1941
Piper L-4 Grasshopper
The exemplary Piper-produced J-3 Cub series of light observation aircraft - which includes the L-4 Grasshopper - has been flying since the 1940s.
Thumbnail picture of the Piper L-4 Grasshopper

1934
Polikarpov I-15 (Chaika)
For her time, the Polikarpov I-15 proved an excellent fighter mount and served over Spain, Manchuria and the Eastern Front.
Thumbnail picture of the Polikarpov I-15 (Chaika)

1935
Polikarpov I-16
The I-16, though outclassed by its contemporaries, played many an important role throughout World War Two.
Thumbnail picture of the Polikarpov I-16

1929
Polikarpov Po-2 (Mule)
The Polikarpov Po-2 represents the most-produced biplane of all time.
Thumbnail picture of the Polikarpov Po-2 (Mule)

1938
Potez 630 (Series)
This Potez line of multirole aircraft took part in several of the major campaigns of World War 2 - including the failed defense of France in 1940.
Thumbnail picture of the Potez 630 (Series)

1932
PZL P.11
The PZL P.11 was part of the valiant - though ultimately failed - defense by the Polish Air Force during the German Blitzkrieg of 1939.
Thumbnail picture of the PZL P.11

1936
PZL.23 Karas
In 1939, Poland could field just under 100 of the outclassed PZL.23 systems against the German Luftwaffe.
Thumbnail picture of the PZL.23 Karas

1941
Radioplane OQ-2
The Radioplane OQ-2 aerial target drone was the first quantitative UAV purchase for the United States.
Thumbnail picture of the Radioplane OQ-2

1940
Reggiane Re.2000 Falco I (Falcon I)
The Italian Reggiane Re.2000 monoplane fighter was initially delivered via export to Hungary and Sweden.
Thumbnail picture of the Reggiane Re.2000 Falco I (Falcon I)

1941
Reggiane Re.2001 Falco II (Falcon II)
Development and production of the Reggiane Re.2001 series proved slow, yielding just 237 examples in all.
Thumbnail picture of the Reggiane Re.2001 Falco II (Falcon II)

1942
Reggiane Re.2002 Ariete (Ram)
Though developed as early as 1941, the first Italian air groups fielding the Re.2002 did not form until March of 1943.
Thumbnail picture of the Reggiane Re.2002 Ariete (Ram)

1943
Reggiane Re.2005 Sagittario (Archer)
The Italian Reggiane Re.2005 fighter of World War 2 certainly benefited from its German Diamler-Benz DB 605 inline engine - though limited in service by the 48 total production examples.
Thumbnail picture of the Reggiane Re.2005 Sagittario (Archer)

1941
Republic P-43 Lancer
Production of the early-war Republic P-43 Lancer spanned from 1940 to 1941 and yielded some 272 total aircraft.
Thumbnail picture of the Republic P-43 Lancer

1942
Republic P-47 / F-47 Thunderbolt
The Republic P-47 Thunderbolt was affectionately called the Jug and proved THE unsung hero of World War 2, fighting effectively in all major theaters of war as fighter or bomber.
Thumbnail picture of the Republic P-47 / F-47 Thunderbolt

1946
Republic XF-12 Rainbow
The Republic XF-12 Rainbow squared off against the Hughes XF-11 with both losing out thanks to the end of World War 2 and the shift to jets.
Thumbnail picture of the Republic XF-12 Rainbow

1944
Republic XP-72 Super Thunderbolt
The XP-72 Wasp Major-powered Super Thunderbolt would have been an exceptional fighter but favorable events for the Allies in WW2 stopped its promising development.
Thumbnail picture of the Republic XP-72 Super Thunderbolt

1940
Rogozarski IK-3
Production of the promising Rogozarski IK-3 series was cut short by the German invasion of Yugoslavia during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Rogozarski IK-3

1945
Ryan FR Fireball
The Ryan Fireball was a composite fighter design, making use of both a radial piston and a turbojet engine.
Thumbnail picture of the Ryan FR Fireball

1945
Saab J 21
The J 21 first appeared as a prop-driven aircraft only to later become a fully jet-powered platform.
Thumbnail picture of the Saab J 21

1936
Saunders-Roe A.27 London
SARO Londons were pressed into service at the beginning of World War 2 and some thirty examples were ultimately produced.
Thumbnail picture of the Saunders-Roe A.27 London

1939
Saunders-Roe A.36 Lerwick
Design flaws limited SARO Lerwick production to just 21 airframes - and ten of these were lost to accidents.
Thumbnail picture of the Saunders-Roe A.36 Lerwick

1936
Savoia-Marchetti SM.79 Sparviero (Sparrowhawk)
The Savoia-Marchetti SM.79 Sparrowhawk became the best Italian bomber of World War 2, particularly in the anti-shipping role.
Thumbnail picture of the Savoia-Marchetti SM.79 Sparviero (Sparrowhawk)

1935
Savoia-Marchetti SM.81 Pipistrello (Bat)
The Savoia-Marchetti SM.81 survived World War 2 and continued in service until 1950.
Thumbnail picture of the Savoia-Marchetti SM.81 Pipistrello (Bat)

1941
Savoia-Marchetti SM.84
The Savoia-Marchetti SM.84 three-engined bomber was developed to replace the SM.79 series in service with the Regia Aeronautica - it failed in its goal.
Thumbnail picture of the Savoia-Marchetti SM.84

1937
Seversky P-35
The Seversky P-35 became the USAACs first all-metal fighter and saw combat action against Japan in the early years of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Seversky P-35

1937
Short S25 Sunderland
The British Short Sunderland became one the finest flying boat aircraft to serve in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Short S25 Sunderland

1941
Short Stirling
The Short Stirling four-engined bomber made up a large contingent of RAF heavy bombing capability at one point during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Short Stirling

1942
Sikorsky R-4
The Sikorsky R-4 became the first widely-produced helicopter in aviation history, seeing 131 units in all.
Thumbnail picture of the Sikorsky R-4

1935
Sikorsky S-43
Sikorsky introduced their S-43 model in 1935 and built some 53 of the type.
Thumbnail picture of the Sikorsky S-43

1941
Thumbnail picture of the Stinson L-1 Vigilant (Model 74)

1942
Stinson L-5 Sentinel
The Stinson L-5 Sentinel series was specifically developed for service in World War 2 as a liaison platform.
Thumbnail picture of the Stinson L-5 Sentinel

1933
Stinson Reliant
The high-wing monplane Stinson Reliant series soldiered on before, through and after World War 2 in service with several notable operators.
Thumbnail picture of the Stinson Reliant

1940
Sukhoi Su-1 / Su-3
The Sukhoi Su-1 and Su-3 were a pair of one-off prototypes being developed during the early stages of World War 2, neither type seeing adoption by the Soviet Air Force.
Thumbnail picture of the Sukhoi Su-1 / Su-3

1941
Sukhoi Su-2
The Sukhoi Su-2 was used in spotter, reconnaissance, and bomber squadrons for the USSR during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Sukhoi Su-2

1946
Supermarine Seafang
The Supermarine Seafang was intended as a future Royal Navy carrier-based fighter int he mold of the classic Spitfire series.
Thumbnail picture of the Supermarine Seafang

1942
Supermarine Seafire
The carrierborne Supermarine Seafire was a derivative of the highly successful Supermarine land-based Spitfire.
Thumbnail picture of the Supermarine Seafire

1944
Supermarine Spiteful
The Supermarine Spiteful was developed during World War 2 as a possible successor to the storied Spitfire fighter series.
Thumbnail picture of the Supermarine Spiteful

1938
Supermarine Spitfire
The Supermarine Spitfire became the undisputed champion of the British cause during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Supermarine Spitfire

1937
Supermarine Stranraer
The Supermarine Stranraer was the last of the line of biplane flying boats to be accepted into service with the RAF.
Thumbnail picture of the Supermarine Stranraer

1936
Supermarine Walrus
The Supermarine Walrus served with a myriad of British and Commonwealth squadrons and saw approximately 740 examples delivered.
Thumbnail picture of the Supermarine Walrus

1943
Tachikawa Ki-70 (Clara)
Tachikawa of Japan completed only three of its Ki-70 high-speed photographic reconnaissance prototypes during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Tachikawa Ki-70 (Clara)

1944
Tachikawa Ki-74 (Pat / Patsy)
The end of World War 2 in 1945 signaled the end of the Tachikawa Ki-74 long-range reconnaissance bomber project for Japan.
Thumbnail picture of the Tachikawa Ki-74 (Pat / Patsy)

1942
Tachikawa Ki-77
Despite setting what were unofficial world records during World War 2, the Tachikawa Ki-77 was limited by the Japanese war situation of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Tachikawa Ki-77

1935
Tachikawa Ki-9
The Tachikawa Ki-9 military trainer survived World War 2 through 2,618 examples.
Thumbnail picture of the Tachikawa Ki-9

1940
Tucker XP-57 (Peashooter)
Preston Tucker attempted to nab a U.S. Army contract by pushing this ultimately-abandoned XP-57 Peashooter bomber interceptor.
Thumbnail picture of the Tucker XP-57 (Peashooter)

1936
Tupolev SB-2
The Tupolev SB-2 was a solid performer when it came onto the scene in 1936 though vastly outclassed by 1938.
Thumbnail picture of the Tupolev SB-2

1942
Tupolev Tu-2 (Bat)
The Tupolev Tu-2 Bat served a variety of critical frontline roles for the Soviet Air Force in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Tupolev Tu-2 (Bat)

1942
Vickers Type 432
The single-seat, twin-engined Type 432 heavy fighter of World War 2 marked the last notable foray for the Vickers company into military fighter development.
Thumbnail picture of the Vickers Type 432

1937
Vickers Wellesley
Introduced in 1937, only 177 of the serviceable Vickers Wellesley bombers were produced - the line was given up as soon as 1944.
Thumbnail picture of the Vickers Wellesley

1938
Vickers Wellington
The Vickers Wellington was the primary medium bomber of the Royal Air Force at the start of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Vickers Wellington

1943
VL Myrsky (Storm)
The indigenous Finnish VL Myrsky fighter series led a relatively short operational life and saw limited production numbers.
Thumbnail picture of the VL Myrsky (Storm)

1942
Vought F4U Corsair
The fast and powerful Vought F4U Corsair fighter was the first Allied aircraft capable of going toe-to-toe with the fabled Japanese Zero.
Thumbnail picture of the Vought F4U Corsair

1940
Vought OS2U Kingfisher
Though an American product, the Vought OS2U Kingfisher series served in quantity with the ranks of the British Fleet Air Arm.
Thumbnail picture of the Vought OS2U Kingfisher

1937
Vought SB2U Vindicator
The Vought SB2U Vindicator was obsolete by the time of America's involvement in World War 2 and relegated to training elements by 1943.
Thumbnail picture of the Vought SB2U Vindicator

1942
Vought V-173 (Flying Pancake)
The Vought V-173 was certainly one of the more unique fighter forms to come out of testing during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Vought V-173 (Flying Pancake)

1943
Vought XF5U (Flying Flapjack)
Of the two XF5U airframes built by Vought for the US Navy, only one was ever completed - ending her days as a museum showpiece.
Thumbnail picture of the Vought XF5U (Flying Flapjack)

1941
Vultee A-35 Vengeance
The Vultee A-35 Vengeance was delivered for the defense of France but the results there forced future orders to British hands via Lend-Lease.
Thumbnail picture of the Vultee A-35 Vengeance

1939
Vultee BT-13 Valiant
The Vultee BT-13 Valiant was one of the more outstanding trainer aircraft of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Vultee BT-13 Valiant

1941
Vultee P-66 Vanguard
The Vultee P-66 Vanguard was originally ordered by Sweden, held back by the United States, and eventually featured over China.
Thumbnail picture of the Vultee P-66 Vanguard

1944
Vultee XA-41
Originating as a dive bomber, the Vultee XA-41 was evolved into an attack platform until passed on by the United States Army.
Thumbnail picture of the Vultee XA-41

1943
Vultee XP-54 Swoose Goose
The ill-fated Vultee XP-54 Swoose Goose tried to break out-of-the-box on too many fronts at once.
Thumbnail picture of the Vultee XP-54 Swoose Goose

1945
Vultee XP-81
The Vultee XP-81 was a combination fighter powered by both turboprop and turbojet powerplant technology.
Thumbnail picture of the Vultee XP-81

1942
Waco CG-4 (Hadrian)
The Waco CG-4 Hadrian towed glider proved one of the more important glider types for the Allies during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Waco CG-4 (Hadrian)

1944
Westland Welkin
The Westland Welkin was a promising twin-engine, high-altitude interceptor designed in anticipation of another Luftwaffe bombing campaign over Britain.
Thumbnail picture of the Westland Welkin

1940
Westland Whirlwind
Impressive when it appeared in the late 1930s, the Westland Whirlwind was all but outmoded by 1943 and primarily doomed by its choice of engine.
Thumbnail picture of the Westland Whirlwind

1940
Yakovlev Yak-1 (Krasavyets)
The Yakovlev Yak-1 - and its related Yak-3, Yak-7 and Yak-9 brethren - are an oft-forgotten breed when comparing the best piston-engined fighters of World War 2, surpassing some 36,000 aircraft built in all.
Thumbnail picture of the Yakovlev Yak-1 (Krasavyets)

1944
Yakovlev Yak-3
The capabilities of the new Yak-3 came as a nasty shock to the German Luftwaffe over Soviet skies in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Yakovlev Yak-3

1942
Yakovlev Yak-7
The Yakovlev Yak-7 formed a valuable portion of the capable Yakovlev stable of fighter aircraft for the Soviet Air Force during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Yakovlev Yak-7

1943
Yakovlev Yak-9 (Frank)
The Yak-9 was developed from an experimental version of the Yak-7 fighter series.
Thumbnail picture of the Yakovlev Yak-9 (Frank)

1942
Yokosuka D4Y Suisei (Judy)
Though hitting some speed bumps early on in its development evolution, the D4Y proved to be a capable carrier-based performer.
Thumbnail picture of the Yokosuka D4Y Suisei (Judy)

1945
Yokosuka MXY7-K1 Ohka (Cherry Blossom)
The macabre Yokosuka MXY7 Ohka system never materialized as a serious threat to Allied warships in the Pacific.
Thumbnail picture of the Yokosuka MXY7-K1 Ohka (Cherry Blossom)

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