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WW1 Aircraft

Last Updated: 5/26/2015

World War 1 evolved aircraft technology along all frontiers - graduating them from their original canvas-over-wood construction to increased incorporation of metal throughout.


The aircraft played a pivotal role for all sides of World War 1 when the conflict began in 1914. Early forms were typically unarmed and used in the reconnaissance role until personal weapons were added. From there, the machine gun was finally fixed to these aircraft to create the "fighter" aeroplane. As the situation on the ground slowed to become Trench Warfare, it would fall to the men in the skies to provide a breakthrough and ultimately force air superiority on the enemy. Many aircraft types emerged from the fighting - scouts, night bombers, night fighters, ground attack - and these served to pave the way for new, post-war aircraft that followed.


There are a total of (143) World War 1 Aircraft in the Military Factory. Entries are listed below by alphanumeric order descending. Flag images indicative of country of origin.




1916
AEG C.IV
The AEG-produced C-series of aircraft provided German frontline troops with a versatile offensive performer throughout the course of World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the AEG C.IV

1916
AEG G.IV
The AEG G.IV series of medium bombers were a German Air Service stalwart from 1916 through 1918.
Thumbnail picture of the AEG G.IV

1917
Aeromarine 39
The Aeromarine 39 became the first American aircraft to land on a moving carrier in 1922.
Thumbnail picture of the Aeromarine 39

1918
Aeromarine 40
The Aeromarine 40 floatplane series saw only 50 built from the original 200-strong production contract thanks to the end of World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Aeromarine 40

1915
AGO C.II
The AGO C.II only served the German air force for about one year before being replaced.
Thumbnail picture of the AGO C.II

1915
Airco DH.2
The Airco DH.2, a rugged and nimble design, helped to win back Allied air superiority by 1916.
Thumbnail picture of the Airco DH.2

1917
Airco DH.4
The Airco DH.4 was a highly-produced day bomber for Allied forces in the First World War.
Thumbnail picture of the Airco DH.4

1917
Airco DH.5
The Airco DH.5 tried - rather unsuccessfully - to mesh some very distinct design qualities of previous de Havilland designs.
Thumbnail picture of the Airco DH.5

1917
Airco DH.9
The planned successor to the Airco DH.4, the Airco DH.9 failed in most respects.
Thumbnail picture of the Airco DH.9

1914
Albatros B.II
Only seeing a short stint on the frontlines, the B.II stayed on through the entire war as a trainer aircraft.
Thumbnail picture of the Albatros B.II

1915
Albatros C.I
The German Albatros C.I was a widely-used reconnaissance aircraft in World War One.
Thumbnail picture of the Albatros C.I

1915
Albatros C.III
The effective Albatros C.III biplane became the most-produced of the C-type reconnaissance aircraft fielded by the Germans during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Albatros C.III

1916
Albatros C.V
The Albatros C.V was a step backwards in the evolution of the C-series aircraft systems.
Thumbnail picture of the Albatros C.V

1917
Albatros C.X
The Albatros C.X paved the way for the even more effective Albatros C.XII variant.
Thumbnail picture of the Albatros C.X

1916
Albatros D.I
The Albatros D.I helped Germany regain control of the skies from the Allies in early 1917.
Thumbnail picture of the Albatros D.I

1916
Albatros D.II
The Albatros D.II built upon the success of the D.I by improving it design and performance figures.
Thumbnail picture of the Albatros D.II

1917
Albatros D.III
Though an overall improvement of the D.I and D.II, the sesquiplane wing arrangement of the new D.III led to a noted structural deficiency.
Thumbnail picture of the Albatros D.III

1917
Albatros D.V
The Albatros D.V continued where the preceding D.III design left off, though it also brought along with it inherent structural issues that were never fully resolved.
Thumbnail picture of the Albatros D.V

1917
Albatros D.Va
The Albatros D.Va was a variant on the D.V series of German aircraft.
Thumbnail picture of the Albatros D.Va

1917
Albatros J.I
The Albatros J.I was specifically developed for infantry close-support and suffered from armor weight and a weak engine.
Thumbnail picture of the Albatros J.I

1918
Ansaldo A 1 Balilla (Hunter)
The Balilla was Italy's first true indigenous fighter design.
Thumbnail picture of the Ansaldo A 1 Balilla (Hunter)

1917
Armstrong Whitworth FK8
The Armstrong Whitworth FK.8 proved to be a highly versatile platform, taking on a variety of sortie types throughout its service life.
Thumbnail picture of the Armstrong Whitworth FK8

1914
Aviatik B.I
The Aviatik B.I was a capable reconnaissance platform serving with Germany up until early 1916.
Thumbnail picture of the Aviatik B.I

1915
Aviatik C.I
The German Aviatik C.I was designed from the outset with military use in mind, sporting a single 7.92mm Parabellum machine gun for self-defense.
Thumbnail picture of the Aviatik C.I

1917
Aviatik D.I (Berg D.I)
The Aviatik D.I became the first indigenously-designed fighter to be built in Austria.
Thumbnail picture of the Aviatik D.I (Berg D.I)

1913
Avro 504
The Avro Type 504 design became of the most remarkable airplane designs to stem from World War One.
Thumbnail picture of the Avro 504

1916
Avro 523 Pike
Only two Avro Pike bombers were ever completed, these prototypes serving as testbeds for the duration of World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Avro 523 Pike

1917
Avro 529
Only two Avro 529 airframes were ever constructed and no production orders were forthcoming.
Thumbnail picture of the Avro 529

1917
Beardmore WB III / SB 3
William Beardmore and Co developed their W.B.III as a carrier version of the Sopwith Pup fighter.
Thumbnail picture of the Beardmore WB III / SB 3

1918
Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo
The Blackburn Kangaroo was a land-based variant of the Blackburn G.P. anti-submarine floatplane prototype design.
Thumbnail picture of the Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo

1909
Bleriot XI
The Bleriot provided many firsts for aspiring pilots of the early 1900s, seeing time as a trainer in the early stages of World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Bleriot XI

1915
Breguet Br.M5
The Breguet Br.M5 served as a principle night bomber from 1916 through 1917.
Thumbnail picture of the Breguet Br.M5

1917
Breguet Bre.14
The Breguet 14 represented the single-most important aircraft flying for French forces in World War One.
Thumbnail picture of the Breguet Bre.14

1917
Bristol F.2
It was not until pilots began flying their two-seat F.2's as single-seat fighters that the type saw success in The Great War.
Thumbnail picture of the Bristol F.2

1914
Bristol Scout
The Bristol Scout biplane might have had a better war time record if it had been armed properly at an earlier date.
Thumbnail picture of the Bristol Scout

1917
C.23 (Coastal Class)
First flying in 1916, C.23 was done in by its own Lewis machine gunner which forced her removal from service in May of 1917.
Thumbnail picture of the C.23 (Coastal Class)

1915
Caproni Ca.1
The Italians and Russians led the way in developing the first useful heavy bombers in the world - the Caproni Ca.1 was a testament to that.
Thumbnail picture of the Caproni Ca.1

1917
Caproni Ca.3
The Ca.36 was the definitive Italian bomber design by the end of World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Caproni Ca.3

1914
Caudron G.3
The French Caudron G.3 reconnaissance biplane was an evolved 1914 form of the earlier G.2 series
Thumbnail picture of the Caudron G.3

1915
Caudron G.4
The Cau 4B.2 faced many losses in the daylight bomber role and was relegated to the reconnaissance and fire spotting role with the Cau G.4A series.
Thumbnail picture of the Caudron G.4

1917
Caudron G.6
The Caudron G.6 brought along the design of the earlier G.4 with an all-new fuselage arrangement.
Thumbnail picture of the Caudron G.6

1918
Caudron R.11
The Cau R.11 appeared in the last year of the war and evolved from armed reconnaissance to bomber escort.
Thumbnail picture of the Caudron R.11

1917
Curtiss H-16
The H-16 Flying Boat was the final evolution of the Curtiss Model H design.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss H-16

1915
Curtiss JN-4 (Jenny)
The Curtiss JN-4 Jenny series of biplane trainers served in thousands of examples across multiple national air forces.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss JN-4 (Jenny)

1918
Curtiss NC (Navy Curtiss / Nancy Boat)
Only ten Curtiss NC aircraft were purchased during its production run and utilized primarily by the United States Navy over the Atlantic.
Thumbnail picture of the Curtiss NC (Navy Curtiss / Nancy Boat)

1916
DFW C.V
The DFV C.V proved its mettle from 1916 up until the early months of the last year of the war.
Thumbnail picture of the DFW C.V

1917
Dorand AR
The Dorand Ar series of observation biplanes served in some number during World War 1, with both the French and Americans.
Thumbnail picture of the Dorand AR

1917
Fairey Campania
The Fairey Campania was the first purposely built carrier aircraft in the world.
Thumbnail picture of the Fairey Campania

1918
Fairey III
Nealry 1,000 examples of the Fairey III series aircraft were built for a dozen operators from World War 1 onwards.
Thumbnail picture of the Fairey III

1914
Farman MF.11 Shorthorn
Just about every major player on the Allies side of World War 1 stocked the French Farman MF.11 in their inventories.
Thumbnail picture of the Farman MF.11 Shorthorn

1917
Felixstowe F.2
The Felixstowe F.2 was a militarized British version of the American Curtiss H-12 flying boat.
Thumbnail picture of the Felixstowe F.2

1918
Felixstowe F.5
The Felixstowe F-series became the standard flying boat for the RAF and was adopted by the Americans in time.
Thumbnail picture of the Felixstowe F.5

1918
Fokker C.I
Developed during the last year of World War 1, the Fokker C.I went on to have a post-war career with a select few nations.
Thumbnail picture of the Fokker C.I

1918
Fokker D.VII
The finest of the German war time fighters of World War 1 became the Fokker D.VII biplane of 1918.
Thumbnail picture of the Fokker D.VII

1918
Fokker D.VIII (Fokker E.V)
The Fokker D.VIII monoplane fighter has the distinction of recording the last air kill in the First World War.
Thumbnail picture of the Fokker D.VIII (Fokker E.V)

1917
Fokker Dr.I (Dreidecker) Triplane
With the three wing setup inducing substantial drag, the Dr.I was slower than her contemporaries but made up for it in manueverability and rate of climb.
Thumbnail picture of the Fokker Dr.I (Dreidecker) Triplane

1915
Fokker E (Eindecker)
The Fokker Eindecker monoplane fighter with its synchronized machine gun introduced armed aerial combat during World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Fokker E (Eindecker)

1917
Friedrichshafen G.III
The Friedrichshafen G.III proved an excellent bomber for the German Empire during World War 1, seeing destructive action in night sorties.
Thumbnail picture of the Friedrichshafen G.III

1916
Gotha G.IV
The Gotha G.IV series appeared in several hundred examples and was produced from 1916 to 1917.
Thumbnail picture of the Gotha G.IV

1917
Gotha G.V
The German Air Service utilized the Gotha series of heavy bombers to good effect throughout World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Gotha G.V

1918
Halberstadt CL.IV
Though excelling in the ground attack role, the Halberstadt CL.IV lacked much protection against ground fire.
Thumbnail picture of the Halberstadt CL.IV

1918
Handley Page H.P. O/400
For a time, the HP O/400 was the largest aircraft ever produced for the United Kingdom.
Thumbnail picture of the Handley Page H.P. O/400

1916
Hanriot HD.1
The French Air Service rejected the Hanriot HD.1 but it did see service primarily with Belgian and Italian forces in World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Hanriot HD.1

1914
Hansa-Brandenburg B.I (Type D/FD)
The Hansa-Brandenburg B.I was designed by Ernst Heinkel and was an unarmed reconnaissance aircraft of World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Hansa-Brandenburg B.I (Type D/FD)

1916
Hansa-Brandenburg C.I (Type LDD)
The Hansa-Brandenburg C.I series was designed by Ernst Heinkel and produced in over 1,300 forms.
Thumbnail picture of the Hansa-Brandenburg C.I (Type LDD)

1916
Hansa-Brandenburg D.I (Type KD)
The Hansa-Brandenburg D.I was produced in limited numbers though it made several aces for Austria-Hungary during her tenure.
Thumbnail picture of the Hansa-Brandenburg D.I (Type KD)

1917
Hansa-Brandenburg W.12
The Hansa-Brandenburg W.12 was intended to repair the failings inherent in the previous KDW series with the addition of a rear gunner.
Thumbnail picture of the Hansa-Brandenburg W.12

1918
Junkers CL.I
The Junkers CL.I could have been so much more had it not been for production difficulties encountered in war time Germany.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers CL.I

1915
Lebed Type XII
The Lebed XII reconnaissance biplane was one of the few indigenous Russian aircraft designs to emerge during World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Lebed Type XII

1916
LFG Roland C.II (Whale)
The LFG Roland C.II was a dedicated two-seat reconnaissance platform of the German Empire during World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the LFG Roland C.II (Whale)

1918
LFG Roland D.VI
The LFG Roland D.VI biplane fighter series arrived in small numbers by the end of World War 1 - making a minimal impact on the air war.
Thumbnail picture of the LFG Roland D.VI

1915
Lloyd C.II
The Lloyd C-series of biplanes was produced in three major reconnaissance versions - the C.II, C.III and C.IV.
Thumbnail picture of the Lloyd C.II

1915
Lohner B.VII
The Lohner B.VII was the unarmed version of the Lohner reconnaissance planes that included the armed C.I.
Thumbnail picture of the Lohner B.VII

1916
Lohner C.I
The Lohner was produced in two major versions - an armed and unarmed reconnaissance platforms.
Thumbnail picture of the Lohner C.I

1915
LVG B (Series)
The LVG B-series of twin-seat biplane aircraft was produced in three distinct variants.
Thumbnail picture of the LVG B (Series)

1915
LVG C.II
The LVG C.II became the first fixed-wing aircraft to bomb London, this coming in a strike on Victoria Railway Station.
Thumbnail picture of the LVG C.II

1917
LVG C.V
The LVG C.V was widely distributed across the West Front beginning in 1917.
Thumbnail picture of the LVG C.V

1918
LVG C.VI
The C.VI was an LVG attempt at producing an improved form of their C.V two-seat reconnaissance platform.
Thumbnail picture of the LVG C.VI

1917
Macchi M.5
Despite its clunky boat-like appearance, the Macchi M.5 held excellent agility in combat as a fighter.
Thumbnail picture of the Macchi M.5

1918
Macchi M.7
A specially-modified form of the Macchi M.7 flying boat fighter claimed the Schneider Trophy of 1921.
Thumbnail picture of the Macchi M.7

1918
Martin MB-1 / Glenn Martin Bomber
Only nine Martin MB-1 series bombers were completed before the end of hostilities in World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Martin MB-1 / Glenn Martin Bomber

1918
Martinsyde F.4 Buzzard
The fast Martinsyde Buzzard biplane fighter arrived to late to see operational action in World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Martinsyde F.4 Buzzard

1915
Morane-Saulnier Type N
The Morane-Saulnier Type N was of an advanced aerodynamic design for the time.
Thumbnail picture of the Morane-Saulnier Type N

1915
Nieuport 11 (Bebe)
The Nieuport 11 Bebe had its roots in a racing aircraft and proved a major component in ending the dreaded Fokker Scourge.
Thumbnail picture of the Nieuport 11 (Bebe)

1915
Nieuport 12
The twin-seat Nieuport 12 was a larger and faster version of the preceding single-seat Nieuport 10 biplane fighter model.
Thumbnail picture of the Nieuport 12

1916
Nieuport 17
The Nieuport 17 of 1916 was a continuation of fighting excellence first revealed in the Nieuport 11 of 1915.
Thumbnail picture of the Nieuport 17

1917
Nieuport 27
The Nieuport 27 was a continuation of the Nieuport 17 fighter line of 1916.
Thumbnail picture of the Nieuport 27

1918
Nieuport 28
The Nieuport 28 was the first operational fighter to be fielded by incoming American forces during World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Nieuport 28

1918
NS7
NS7 became one of the more famous North Sea-class airships of World War 1 alongside sister-ship NS6.
Thumbnail picture of the NS7

1917
Pfalz D.III
The Pfalz D.III excelled in dive attacks on Allied observation balloons.
Thumbnail picture of the Pfalz D.III

1917
Phonix C.I
The reconnaissance C.I was one of over two dozen airplane types produced by Phonix during World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Phonix C.I

1917
Phonix D (Series)
The Phonix D-series proved a dependable aircraft once her handling kinks were worked out.
Thumbnail picture of the Phonix D (Series)

1912
Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2
Though introduced as early as 1912, the RAF B.E.2 still saw operational use throughout all of World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2

1915
Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.2
The F.E.2 series was a pivotal Allied performer during the Fokker Scourge and later went on to become a capable night bomber.
Thumbnail picture of the Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.2

1916
Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8
The RAF F.E.8 was no match for German aircraft as the pilot was charged with flying his aircraft, scanning for enemy, aiming and shooting the machine gun all on his own.
Thumbnail picture of the Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8

1916
Royal Aircraft Factory R.E.8
Over 4,000 of the Royal Aircraft Factory R.E.8 reconnaissance light bombers were produced during World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Royal Aircraft Factory R.E.8

1917
Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5
As the required training time for new pilots was short, the Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5 was specifically designed to be easy to fly.
Thumbnail picture of the Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5

1916
Rumpler 6B
The Rumpler 6B line was nothing more than modified versions of existing Rumpler two-seat fighting scouts.
Thumbnail picture of the Rumpler 6B

1914
Rumpler B.I
At least 224 Rumpler B.I reconnaissance aircraft were produced during World War 1 including some 26 floatplane types for the German Navy.
Thumbnail picture of the Rumpler B.I

1915
Rumpler C.I
The Rumpler C-series of biplane aircraft were introduced in 1915 and, amazingly, managed an existence throughout World War 1 into 1918.
Thumbnail picture of the Rumpler C.I

1916
Rumpler C.III
The Rumpler C.III series served the German Empire well and set up the stage for the much improved C.IV to follow.
Thumbnail picture of the Rumpler C.III

1917
Rumpler C.IV
The Rumpler C.IV found value wiht several world air forces for its time, even being produced by Pfalz during World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Rumpler C.IV

1917
Rumpler C.VII
The Rumpler C.VII was produced in two notable versions - a long-range reconnassiance type and a high-altitude reconnaissance model, both proving very capable.
Thumbnail picture of the Rumpler C.VII

1917
Rumpler C.VIII
The Rumpler C.VIII advanced trainer survived the through to the end of World War 1 and continued limited service into the 1920s.
Thumbnail picture of the Rumpler C.VIII

1917
Rumpler D.I
The Rumpler D.I biplane fighter saw serial production late into the war and, threfore, none saw any combat service of note.
Thumbnail picture of the Rumpler D.I

1915
Rumpler G.I
The Rumpler G.I began service with the German Air Force in 1915 with some 220 examples ultimately built.
Thumbnail picture of the Rumpler G.I

1910
Rumpler Taube (Etrich Taube)
Despite its weak appearance, the Rumpler Taube was used in a variety of battlefield roles during its service tenure.
Thumbnail picture of the Rumpler Taube (Etrich Taube)

1918
Salmson 2
The Salmson 2 made up a large portion of French reconnaissance air power by the end of World War 1 in 1918.
Thumbnail picture of the Salmson 2

1915
Short Type 184
The Short Type 184 seaplane served in great numbers with the British Royal Air Force.
Thumbnail picture of the Short Type 184

1916
Siemens-Schuckert D.I
The Siemens-Schuckert D.I was a German reverse-engineered copy of the French Nieuport 17 biplane fighter.
Thumbnail picture of the Siemens-Schuckert D.I

1917
Siemens-Schuckert D.III
The Siemens-Schuckert D.III was plagued by engine troubles early on, delaying its use along the Front for a time.
Thumbnail picture of the Siemens-Schuckert D.III

1918
Siemens-Schuckert D.IV
The Siemens-Schuckert D.IV was still in production after the armistice was signed and is oft-regarded as the best fighter design of the Great War.
Thumbnail picture of the Siemens-Schuckert D.IV

1919
Siemens-Schuckert R.VIII
The Siemens-Schuckert R.VIII was the largest completed aircraft in the world by 1919 standards.
Thumbnail picture of the Siemens-Schuckert R.VIII

1915
Sikorsky Ilya Mourometz (Series)
The Mourometz featured an internal bomb bay and bomb sighting device, forming the worlds first bomber group under the flag of the Imperial Russian Air Force.
Thumbnail picture of the Sikorsky Ilya Mourometz (Series)

1916
Sikorsky S-16 (RBVZ S-XVI)
The Sikorsky S-16 served solely with the Russian Empire air service during World War 1 and was taken on by the Soviet Union until their retirement in 1923.
Thumbnail picture of the Sikorsky S-16 (RBVZ S-XVI)

1916
Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter (One-and-One-Half Strutter)
The Sopwith Strutter was the first British aircraft to feature synchronized firing machine guns.
Thumbnail picture of the Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter (One-and-One-Half Strutter)

1915
Sopwith Baby
The Sopwith Baby was born of the Sopwith Schneider design and saw service in the early years of World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Sopwith Baby

1917
Sopwith Camel
The Sopwith Camel was arguably one of the most successful biplane fighter designs of World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Sopwith Camel

1917
Sopwith Dolphin
The Sopwith Dolphin proved to be an outstanding fighter design, providing impressive armament and an attention to pilot needs.
Thumbnail picture of the Sopwith Dolphin

1916
Sopwith Pup
The Sopwith Pup design was an immediate contributor and partly responsible for turning the tide of the air war in 1916.
Thumbnail picture of the Sopwith Pup

1918
Sopwith Rhino
Developmental problems aside, the Sopwith Rhino Triplane Bomber did not impress UK officials enough to warrant serial production by the end of World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Sopwith Rhino

1918
Sopwith Snipe
The Sopwith Snipe was an evolved form of the successful war-winning Sopwith Camel design - though not appearing until the final weeks of World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Sopwith Snipe

1914
Sopwith Tabloid
The Sopwith Tabloid began the Sopwith branding of aircraft that found huge success in World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the Sopwith Tabloid

1916
Sopwith Triplane
The success of the Sopwith Triplane fighter forced the Germans into designing their own version - embodied in the Fokker Dr.I Triplane.
Thumbnail picture of the Sopwith Triplane

1915
SPAD A.2
Just under 100 of the SPAD A.2 biplane fighters were produced for action in World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the SPAD A.2

1916
SPAD S.VII
The French SPAD S.VII proved a most capable fighter thanks to sound design and strong inherent qualities.
Thumbnail picture of the SPAD S.VII

1917
SPAD S.XI
The two-seat SPAD S.XI was dogged by issues which led to limited production during World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the SPAD S.XI

1917
SPAD S.XII
The cannon-armed SPAD S.XII was produced in only 300 examples with many of these reserved for experienced pilots.
Thumbnail picture of the SPAD S.XII

1917
SPAD S.XIII
The SPAD S.XIII proved an excellent development of the successful SPAD S.VII design.
Thumbnail picture of the SPAD S.XIII

1918
SPAD S.XIV
Only 40 examples of the SPAD S.XIV floatplane fighter were built during World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the SPAD S.XIV

1920
SPAD S.XX (S.20)
The SPAD S.XX arrived too late to see combat action in World War 1.
Thumbnail picture of the SPAD S.XX (S.20)

1918
SSZ.65
SSZ 65 represented one of the 77 SSZ-class airships constructed by Britain for World War 1 service.
Thumbnail picture of the SSZ.65

1917
Standard J-1
The Standard J-1 tried to replace the much-loved JN-4 Jenny but fell way short of ever achieving the goal.
Thumbnail picture of the Standard J-1

1918
Ufag C.I
The Ufag C.I entered operational service in April of 1918 and featured a 230 horsepower Hiero engine.
Thumbnail picture of the Ufag C.I

1915
Vickers FB.5 (Gunbus)
The Vickers type FB.5 armed biplane scount originally was unveiled through the Type 18 Destroyer at the London Aero Show in 1913.
Thumbnail picture of the Vickers FB.5 (Gunbus)

1919
Vickers Vimy
The Vickers Vimy arrived just in time for the Armistice to end World War 1 but went on to become a record-breaker in the years following.
Thumbnail picture of the Vickers Vimy

1915
Voisin Type 5
The Voisin 5 could mount a single 7.7mm machine gun or a 37mm cannon in the bow gun position.
Thumbnail picture of the Voisin Type 5

1918
Vought VE-7 Bluebird
The VE-7 made up the United States Navys first two fighter squadrons in the VF-1 and VF-2.
Thumbnail picture of the Vought VE-7 Bluebird

1915
Zeppelin L.10 (LZ-40)
German airship LZ-40 managed several raids against Britain in World War 1 but was lost to a lightning strike in early September of 1915.
Thumbnail picture of the Zeppelin L.10 (LZ-40)

1916
Zeppelin L.32 (LZ-74)
German Zeppelin L.32 managed only 11 flights before being downed by the Allies.
Thumbnail picture of the Zeppelin L.32 (LZ-74)

1917
Zeppelin L.52 (LZ-98)
Surviving World War 1, Zeppelin L.52 was destroyed by her crew in 1919.
Thumbnail picture of the Zeppelin L.52 (LZ-98)

1914
Zeppelin Z.XII (LZ-26)
LZ-26 became one of the more successful of the World War 1 German airships with some 44,000lbs of ordnance dropped.
Thumbnail picture of the Zeppelin Z.XII (LZ-26)

1917
Zeppelin-Staaken R-series
The Zeppelin-Staaken Z-series of heavy bombers were the largest such aircraft to serve in World War 1, these with the German Air Service.
Thumbnail picture of the Zeppelin-Staaken R-series

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