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Military Factory

Secret Weapons of the Luftwaffe

Last Updated: 5/26/2015

With the German Air Force losing the advantage in World War 2, all manner of aircraft designs were in play by the end of the conflict.


With the initiative in the air war slipping away, German aviation engineers were allowed a certain level of freedom in coming up for some of the more fantastical solutions to growing wartime problems for the Luftwaffe. Some of the more memorable submissions included rocket-powered interceptors, jet-powered fighters, disposable fuselage bombs, and stealth-minded flying wings. In the end, many of these projects failed to see the light of day but have made for fascinating studies in the decades since the close of the war.


There are a total of (72) Secret Weapons of the Luftwaffe in the Military Factory. Entries are listed below by alphanumeric order descending. Flag images indicative of country of origin.




1944
Arado Ar 234 (Blitz)
The German Arado Ar 234 Blitz became the first purpose-built, jet-powered bomber anywhere in the world.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar 234 (Blitz)

1943
Arado Ar E.340
The cancelled, twin-boom Arado Ar E.340 was to replace the Junkers Ju 88 and Dornier Do 217s medium bombers in service with the German Luftwaffe during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.340

1944
Arado Ar E.381 (Kleinstjager)
The diminuitive Arado Ar E.381 was a parasite fighter prototype intended to be released into combat by an accompanying mothership.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.381 (Kleinstjager)

1936
Arado Ar E.500
A full-size mock-up of the E.500 was created before development stopped on the project altogether.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.500

1940
Arado Ar E.530
The Arado E.530 lost out to the Messerschmitt Zwilling series of similar design.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.530

1943
Arado Ar E.555
Development into the Arado Ar E.555 series was halted in December of 1944, no doubt due to the advance of the Allies.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.555

1945
Arado Ar E.560
The Arado E.560 would have been an impressive machine had it been completed and flown before the end of the war.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.560

1937
Arado Ar E.561
The Arado Ar E.561 was a complicated design best left to the imagination.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.561

1944
Arado Ar E.580
The Arado Ar E.580 single-seat jet-powered fighter unsuccessfully competed against the Heinkel He 162 Volksjager design.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.580

1944
Arado Ar E.581.4
The proposed E.581.4 featured a single turbojet engine with an split-intake mounted in the lower fuselage.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.581.4

1943
Arado Ar E.654 (Kampfzerstorer / Skorpion)
The E.654 received its Skorpion moniker from the distinctive design of its tail.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar E.654 (Kampfzerstorer / Skorpion)

1945
Arado Ar Projekt II
The proposed Projeckt II featured a crew of two in a pressurized cabin complete with ejection seats.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar Projekt II

1943
Arado Ar TEW 16/43-13
The TEW 13 series was to be powered by the volatile T-Stoff and C-Stoff rocket fuel combination.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar TEW 16/43-13

1943
Arado Ar TEW 16/43-15
The Arado Ar TEW 16/43-15 design was a combination jet- and rocket-powered fighter proposal for the German Luftwaffe.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar TEW 16/43-15

1943
Arado Ar TEW 16/43-19
The success of the Arado 234 and Messerschmitt 262 ended the pursuit of the Arado Ar TEW 16/43-19 multirole series.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar TEW 16/43-19

1943
Arado Ar TEW 16/43-23
The Arado TEW 16/43-23 saw its end when priority was given to the Ar 234 Blitz.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado Ar TEW 16/43-23

1945
Arado NJ-1 Nacht Jager (Night Hunter)
The Arado NJ-1 Nacht Jager was a proposed nightfighter design featuring a three-man crew in a pressurized cockpit as well as extensive cannon armament.
Thumbnail picture of the Arado NJ-1 Nacht Jager (Night Hunter)

1945
Bachem Ba 349 Natter (Adder / Viper)
The Bachem Ba 349 Natter was designed to quickly respond to incoming Allied bomber formations and attack with high-explosive rockets.
Thumbnail picture of the Bachem Ba 349 Natter (Adder / Viper)

1938
Blohm and Voss Bv 141
Despite its radical and unorthodox layout, the Blohm & Voss Bv 141 actually did fly and was produced in some 20 examples.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv 141

1944
Blohm and Voss Bv 155
Barely three of the Blohm and Voss Bv 155 day interceptors were realized at the time of the German surrender in May of 1945.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv 155

1943
Blohm and Voss Bv Ae 607
The Blohm and Voss Bv Ae 607 design study utilized a wholly radical design arrangement which included placement of the cockpit within the body of the aircraft and offset to portside.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv Ae 607

1942
Blohm and Voss Bv P.170
The Blohm and Voss P.170 bomber proposal utilized a very unique design configuration that included three engine nacelles along a single wing.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv P.170

1943
Blohm and Voss Bv P.192
The Blohm and Voss P.192 was a proposed replacement for the aging Junkers Ju 87 Stuka dive bomber series.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv P.192

1944
Blohm and Voss Bv P.194
The Blohm and Voss P.194 aircraft proposal of World War 2 joined many other ultimately abandoned aircraft initiatives by the company.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv P.194

1944
Blohm and Voss Bv P.208
The unorthodox, and ultimately abandoned, Blohm and Voss P.208 fighter project influenced the upcoming P.212 jet fighter submission.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv P.208

1945
Blohm and Voss Bv P.209.02
The Blohm and Voss P.209 02 fighter project made use of forward-swept wing mainplanes and a conventional tail unit.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv P.209.02

1945
Blohm and Voss Bv P.212
Another aircraft conceived through the German Emergency Fighter Program of World War 2 was the Blohm and Voss P.212 project.
Thumbnail picture of the Blohm and Voss Bv P.212

1945
Dornier Do 335 Pfeil (Arrow)
The Dornier Do 335 would have made for one outstanding Luftwaffe fighter and interceptor had it been ready in time.
Thumbnail picture of the Dornier Do 335 Pfeil (Arrow)

1944
Fieseler Fi 103R (Reichenberg)
The Fi 103R was the piloted version of the devastating and effective V-1 terror rocket.
Thumbnail picture of the Fieseler Fi 103R (Reichenberg)

1939
Flettner Fl 265
The German Kriegsmarine was interested in this Anton Flettner design concept for use in spotting enemy warships.
Thumbnail picture of the Flettner Fl 265

1942
Flettner Fl 282 Kolibri (Hummingbird)
The Flettner Fl 282 became the first helictoper in history to be used in a military applicable role - this by the German Kriegsmarine in 1942.
Thumbnail picture of the Flettner Fl 282 Kolibri (Hummingbird)

1941
Focke-Achgelis Fa 223 Drache (Dragon)
The German Focke-Achgelis Fa 223 became the first true military transport helicopter when it saw active service in World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Achgelis Fa 223 Drache (Dragon)

1942
Focke-Wulf Fw 191
Three Focke-Wulf Fw 191 bomber prototypes were completed before the program was cancelled in full.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Fw 191

1944
Focke-Wulf Fw 3x1000C
Focke-Wulf designed a single-seat, all-wing, turbojet-powered bomber - the Fw 3x1000C - for a new 1943 RLM requirement that fell to naught.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Fw 3x1000C

1944
Focke-Wulf Fw P.VII (Flitzer)
The Focke-Wulf Fw P.7 jet-and-rocket-powered fighter only reached the mock-up stage before the end of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Fw P.VII (Flitzer)

1943
Focke-Wulf Projekt II
The Focke-Wulf Projekt II jet-powered fighter emerged from designer Kurt Tank during World War 2 as a design study and nothing more.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Projekt II

1944
Focke-Wulf Projekt Kamikaze Carrier
The Focke-Wulf Kamikaze Carrier project would have carried one or several suicide aircraft under her wings - in essence serving as a mothership of sorts.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Projekt Kamikaze Carrier

1945
Focke-Wulf Super Lorin
Like so many other German Luftwaffe paper airplane projects of World War 2, the rocket-and-ramjet-powered Super Lorin interceptor failed to materialize before the end.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Super Lorin

1945
Focke-Wulf Ta 183 (Huckebein)
The Focke-Wulf Ta 183 was only in the prototype phase at the end of the Second World War and thus never flew.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Ta 183 (Huckebein)

1945
Focke-Wulf Ta 283
The Focke-Wulf Ta 283 was a proposed German wartime fighter-interceptor utilizing a combination rocket-ramjet propulsion scheme.
Thumbnail picture of the Focke-Wulf Ta 283

1945
Gotha Go P.60A/B
The Gotha P.60 Day Fighter and Interceptor was an attempt to unseat the Horten Ho 229 flying wing production order.
Thumbnail picture of the Gotha Go P.60A/B

1945
Gotha Go P.60C
The Gotha Project 60C jet-powered nightfighter was conceived of in the final months of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Gotha Go P.60C

1942
Heinkel He 111Z (Zwilling)
The dual-fuselage, five-engine Heinkel He 111 Zwilling was specifically designed as a heavy transport powerful enough to tow the large Messerschmitt Me 321 cargo gliders.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 111Z (Zwilling)

1945
Heinkel He 162 Volksjager (Peoples Fighter)
The German Heinkel He 162 was of an advanced, single-seat, single jet engine design, appearing in limited active numbers towards the end of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 162 Volksjager (Peoples Fighter)

1939
Heinkel He 176
Lackluster performance doomed the all-liquid fueled Heinkel He 176 rocket plane.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 176

1939
Heinkel He 178
The Heinkel He 178 became the first practical turbojet-powered aircraft to fly on August 27th, 1939.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 178

1943
Heinkel He 277 (Amerika Bomber)
Like other multi-engine heavy bomber projects of the Germans during World War 2, little became of the Heinkel He 277 design.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 277 (Amerika Bomber)

1941
Heinkel He 280
The Heinkel He 280 became the first ever turbojet aircraft designed from the outset as a military fighter.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 280

1944
Heinkel He 343 (Strahlbomber / Strabo 16)
The Heinkel He 343 was a proposed four engine jet bomber being developed towards the end of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He 343 (Strahlbomber / Strabo 16)

1945
Heinkel He P.1077 (Julia)
The Heinkel He P.1077 rocket-powered interceptor was approved but evolved too slowly and never saw a single prototype completed by the end of the war.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He P.1077 (Julia)

1945
Heinkel He P.1078B
The Heinkel P.1078B project made up the second of three P.1078 jet-powered fighter projects for the Heinkel concern during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He P.1078B

1945
Heinkel He P.1078C
The Heinkel He P.1078C proposal was delivered for consideration in the Luftwaffe Emergency Fighter Program at the end of 1944.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel He P.1078C

1944
Heinkel Lerche (Lark)
The Heinkel Lerche VTOL interceptor was one of several VTOL design studies undertaken by the Germans during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Heinkel Lerche (Lark)

1945
Henschel Hs 132
The Henschel Hs 132 was intended as a jet-powered dive bomber but only one complete prototype was available by the end of the war.
Thumbnail picture of the Henschel Hs 132

1941
Henschel Hs P.75
The Henschel Hs P.75 heavy fighter and its distinct canard configuration was not furthered beyond the wind tunnel model stage.
Thumbnail picture of the Henschel Hs P.75

1945
Horten Ho IX / Horten Ho 229
The Ho 229 brought about many firsts - advanced swept-back wings, a jet-powered flying wing design and radar absorbing stealth technology.
Thumbnail picture of the Horten Ho IX / Horten Ho 229

1945
Horten Ho XVIII (Amerika Bomber)
Luftwaffe leader Hermann Goring accepted the Horten Ho XVIII Amerika Bomber flying wing proposal for immediate construction.
Thumbnail picture of the Horten Ho XVIII (Amerika Bomber)

1944
Horton Ho X
The Horten X continued the Horten Brothers love affair with the flying wing concept, though the fighter was never completed.
Thumbnail picture of the Horton Ho X

1943
Junkers Ju 187
The abandoned Junkers Ju 187 was intended to replace the much-feared - though outclassed - Ju 87 Stuka in the dive bombing role for the German Luftwaffe.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 187

1944
Junkers Ju 287
The Junkers Ju 287 was one of the more unique green-lighted German jet-powered aircraft projects to appear during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 287

1943
Junkers Ju 390 (New York Bomber)
The Junkers Ju 390 multi-engine long-range heavy bomber was to strike at the heart of major American cities - changing German wartime fortunes ultimately revised this need.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju 390 (New York Bomber)

1945
Junkers Ju EF 140 (Amerika Bomber)
The Junkers contribution to the German wartime Amerika Bomber program was its Ju EF 140 design.
Thumbnail picture of the Junkers Ju EF 140 (Amerika Bomber)

1944
Lippisch P.13A
One of the most fascinating and unorthodox of all the viable German jet-powered designs was the coal-burning Lippisch P.13A delta-winged interceptor.
Thumbnail picture of the Lippisch P.13A

1943
Luftwaffe Mistel (Mistletoe)
Luftwaffe Mistel programs were trialed as early as 1942 and evolved considerably throughout the rest of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Luftwaffe Mistel (Mistletoe)

1944
Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet (Comet)
The explosive - literally and figuratively - Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet was the first operational combat aircraft design to incorporate swept wings.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet (Comet)

1944
Messerschmitt Me 262 (Schwalbe / Sturmvogel)
The German Messerschmitt Me 262 Schwalbe of World War 2 became the first operational-level jet-powered military fighter in the world.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me 262 (Schwalbe / Sturmvogel)

1944
Messerschmitt Me P.1101
The variable-wing Messerschmitt P.1101 never flew but its incomplete airframe was captured by the Allies and put under review in the United States, producing the Bell X-5.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me P.1101

1944
Messerschmitt Me P.1101/92
The impressive-looking Messeschmitt P.1101/92 did not proceed beyond the design stages during World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me P.1101/92

1944
Messerschmitt Me P.1106
The Messerschmitt Me P.1106 fighter-interceptor was a major rewrite of the originally-proposed P.1101 variable-wing jet fighter.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me P.1106

1945
Messerschmitt Me P.1110
The Messerschmitt Me P.1110 jet-powered fighter-interceptor was developed in the late stages of World War 2 under the German Emergency Fighter Program initiative.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me P.1110

1945
Messerschmitt Me P.1111
A tailless design approach was used in finalizing the impressive-looking Messerschmitt P.1111 jet fighter of World War 2.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me P.1111

1945
Messerschmitt Me P.1112
The Messerschmitt Me P.1112 proposal was a further evolution of the earlier P.1111 model.
Thumbnail picture of the Messerschmitt Me P.1112

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