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      Messerschmitt Me P.262 HG III Proposed Jet-Powered Fighter / Interceptor  

    Messerschmitt Me P.262 HG III Proposed Jet-Powered Fighter / Interceptor


    The Messerschmitt P.262 HG III was an evolved projected offshoot of the original Me 262 jet-powered fighter.





     Updated: 10/21/2016; Authored By Staff Writer; Content ¬©www.MilitaryFactory.com


    The Messerschmitt Me 262 HG III (also HG-3) was a short-lived evolution of the iconic Messerschmitt Me 262 jet fighter of World War 2 (1939-1945). The original aircraft, introduced into service during April of 1944, became the world's first operational jet-powered fighter and was posed to give the German Luftwaffe a considerable edge in the skies over Europe but the lack of capable pilots coupled with a deteriorating war situation for Germany led the fighter to have a limited impact in the war.

    Despite this outcome, Messerschmitt engineers continued to push the design along several routes and one path revealed a series of high-speed (Hochgeschwindigkeit) studies during what remained of the war years. The Me 262 HG II was something of a modernized, improved version of the original Me 262 - which was more or less becoming an obsolete product heading into 1945 -while HG III emerged as a drastic overhaul of the base design. The HG initiatives looked to incorporate additional aerodynamic qualities to help performance and fuel efficiency. Work on these aircraft was started in 1944 by Woldemar Voight, the man also responsible for the original Me262.

    The combat effectiveness of the Me 262 in service was somewhat mixed at this point in the war - it was certainly a fast airplane with inherently powerful armament but it utilized unreliable and fuel-thirsty jet engines that were prone to flaming out at altitudes nearing 30,000 feet and higher. As such it lacked the capability to meet Allied bomber formations flying at very-high-altitudes and this was proving to have a disastrous effect on German war-making capabilities. Like it or not, the Luftwaffe found itself squarely in a defensive-minded war and containing the Allied bombing effort became a primary goal for the service.


    Messerschmitt Me P.262 HG III Technical Specifications


    Service Year: 1945
    Type: Proposed Jet-Powered Fighter / Interceptor
    National Origin: Nazi Germany
    Manufacturer(s): Messerschmitt - Nazi Germany
    Production Total: 0



    Structural (Crew Space, Dimensions and Weights)


    Operating Crew: 1
    Length: 34.78 feet (10.6 meters)
    Width: 39.70 feet (12.10 meters)
    Height: 12.47 feet (3.80 meters)

    Weight (Empty): 8,818 lb (4,000 kg)
    Weight (MTOW): 14,330 lb (6,500 kg)

    Installed Power and Standard Day Performance


    Engine(s): 2 x Heinkel HeS 011 turbojet engines developing 2,866lb of thrust each.

    Maximum Speed: 621 mph (1,000 kph; 540 knots)
    Maximum Range: 699 miles (1,125 km)
    Service Ceiling: 39,370 feet (12,000 meters; 7.46 miles)
    Rate-of-Climb: 4,200 feet-per-minute (1,280 m/min)

    Armament / Mission Payload


    PROPOSED:
    4 x 30mm MK 108 cannons in nose.

    Global Operators / Customers


    Nazi Germany (cancelled)

    Model Variants (Including Prototypes)


    P.262 HG III - Project Designation

    HG III "Nacht Jager" - Proposed nightfighter with two-man cockpit and nose-mounted radar fit.

    HG III/3 - Proposed variant with rear-set cockpit

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