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  • Rikugun Ki-202 Rocket-Powered Interceptor Proposal


    The Rikugun Ki-202 was a more evolved form of the earlier Mitsubishi Ki-200, itself a direct copy of the German Messerschmitt Me 163 rocket plane.

     Updated: 10/19/2015; Authored By Staff Writer; Content ¬©www.MilitaryFactory.com


    The alliance between Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan during World War 2 (1939-1945) allowed for the transfer of technology to occur between the two parties. Plans (for both aircraft and rocket engine), components and a complete example of the German Messerschmitt Me 163 "Komet" rocket-powered interceptor were loaded onto a pair of German U-boat submarines which set sail for the Japanese islands. When only one of these boats arrived in Japan, engineers were left with a technological puzzle to solve in getting their Me 163 into the air. With some ingenuity, the Me 163 was finally completed and taken aloft - only to crash on its maiden flight, this sole example becoming a total loss.

    Mitsubishi headed development, and was to manage license manufacturing, of the J8M "Sharp Sword" for the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN). It would also carry the designation of "Ki-200" for the Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) and both were based largely on the Me 163B production model. A first flight of the J8M was had on July 7th, 1945 and seven were completed before the end of the war which was to come that August. The product very closely mimicked the form and function of the original German design.

    During the waning months of the war - by which point American Boeing B-29 "Superfortresses" were bombing Japanese cities with near impunity - the Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) partnered with the concern of Rikugun for an off-shoot of the Ki-200 to help bolster Japanese air defenses but provide far better endurance than the 7.5 minutes of flying time witnessed in the German design. A dimensionally larger airframe to carry additional fuel stores was drawn up and power was to come from a Mitsubishi "Toku" Ro.3 liquid-fueled rocket motor offering 4,410lb of thrust. Estimated performance included a maximum speed of 560 miles per hour, an endurance of 10.5 minutes. a service ceiling of 39,470 feet and a rate-of-climb of 2,430 feet per minute. The aircraft could see 20,000 feet of altitude in as little as 2.5 minutes. Designated Ki-202 "Shusui-Kai" ( "Sharp Sword, Improved"), the name showcasing its direct evolution from the earlier Ki-200 design.


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    Rikugun Ki-202 Technical Specifications


    Service Year: 1945
    Type: Rocket-Powered Interceptor Proposal
    National Origin: Imperial Japan
    Manufacturer(s): Rikugun Kokugijitsu Kenkyujo - Imperial Japan
    Production Total: 0



    Structural (Crew Space, Dimensions and Weights)


    Operating Crew: 1
    Length: 25.20 feet (7.68 meters)
    Width: 31.89 feet (9.72 meters)
    Height: 9.02 feet (2.75 meters)

    Weight (Empty): 3,571 lb (1,620 kg)
    Weight (MTOW): 11,056 lb (5,015 kg)

    Installed Power and Standard Day Performance


    Engine(s): 1 x Mitsubishi Toku Ro.3 liquid-fueled rocket motor developing 4,410 lb of thrust.

    Maximum Speed: 559 mph (900 kph; 486 knots)
    Maximum Range: 25 miles (40 km)
    Service Ceiling: 39,370 feet (12,000 meters; 7.46 miles)
    Rate-of-Climb: 30,000 feet-per-minute (9,144 m/min)

    Armament / Mission Payload


    PROPOSED:
    2 x 30mm Ho 155-II cannons in wings

    Global Operators / Customers


    Imperial Japan

    Model Variants (Including Prototypes)


    Ki-202 - Base Series Designation