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    Blohm and Voss Bv P.213 (Miniatur-Jager) Lightweight Single-Seat Point Defense Interceptor Proposal (1945)

    Blohm and Voss Bv P.213 (Miniatur-Jager) Lightweight Single-Seat Point Defense Interceptor Proposal (1945)

    Continuation of the Blohm and Voss Bv P.213 (Miniatur-Jager) Lightweight Single-Seat Point Defense Interceptor Proposal development period and operational history.






    Blohm & Voss joined competitors Heinkel and Junkers in attempting to fulfill the requirement and developed their P.213 against it. The result was a compact design of 6.2 meter overall length with a wingspan measuring 6 meters. The crewman sat forward in the deep fuselage that featured a cut-off nose for aspiration of the of the pulse jet engine. The engine was partially buried in the lower section of the fuselage and its exposed jet pipe extended out under a slim tail stem. The tail stem held a pair of downward-turned planes (inverted butterfly) for control and the wing mainplanes themselves were shoulder-mounted and fitted immediately aft of the cockpit. The mainplanes exhibited straight leading edge lines and forward-swept trailing edge lines. The canopy was of a three-piece design and offered presumably excellent vision out over the nose and to the sides of the aircraft. A tricycle undercarriage (wholly retractable, compressed air-operated) was part of this futuristic-looking fighter design. The MK 108 cannon was buried in the nose near the feet of the pilot - whose position was protected by armor. Overall weight of the aircraft was judged to be around 3,435 pounds (Take-Off).

    To counter potentially lethal buffeting of the pulse jet engine within the fuselage (as experienced in the Messerschmitt Me 328 "parasite fighter" program), the engine was held in place by brackets offering the needed flexibility during high-speed flight. A section of flexible tubing was to be used for the intake section leading from the nose to the face of the pulse jet engine. The engine was expected to provide speeds of up to 435 miles per hour with a range out to 775 miles but, because pulse jets required assistance to reach a minimum operating speed, rocket boosters would most likely be added for take-off actions (and jettisoned post-launch).

    The P.213 joined the many other Luftwaffe-bound projects that were not selected for further development before the end of the war. Indeed, the Miniatur-Jager concept was all but abandoned even before the end of 1944 so no physical aircraft from anyone manufacturer were completed. The closest adoption became the Bachem Ba 349 "Viper" which first-flew in March of 1945 (and killed its test pilot) and was followed by 36 production-quality units. The rather optimistic Viper program was not a success. ¬©www.MilitaryFactory.com




      Global Operators  


    Nazi Germany (cancelled)

      Model Variants  


    P.213 - Base Project Designation

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    Picture of Blohm and Voss Bv P.213 (Miniatur-Jager)